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JaySteel
26th of May 2011 (Thu), 10:12
Hi everyone. Today I received my first ever request from a company wishing to buy the use of one of my adder photographs from my website. They want to print it in 5000 health and safety leaflets. As this is a complete first for me and has taken me by surprise I'm hoping that someone will be kind enough to recommend an appropriate fee to charge this company.
They need an answer asap so any help would be very much appreciated. I'll have to work out a price list for any future inquiries just in case I get lucky again!
Thanks very much.

Jason

Aperture1.4
26th of May 2011 (Thu), 10:15
5.00 usd per print and limited to 5000 prints. Also concave a lawyer to help you draw up a contract. Never use the companies.

JaySteel
26th of May 2011 (Thu), 10:43
Hi Aperture1.4.
Thanks for your swift reply. $25,000 sounds like an incredible amount of money to charge a company with only 5000 staff. My image will be featured on just one page of their 5000 health and safety leaflets and it'll only be used once. I'm worried that I'm going to blow this opportunity to get my first sale with a quote that they are likely to consider excessive.
I'm not a pro photographer and I'm not dependant on this income so for me any fee would be gratefully received. At the same time I appreciate that if my fee is too low then my work will never be really valued and I'm also under-cutting pro photographers that are dependant on these sales for their livelihood. I very much appreciate your response though.

Best regards,
Jason

JerryA
26th of May 2011 (Thu), 11:17
This might help http://photographersindex.com/stockprice.htm

JaySteel
26th of May 2011 (Thu), 11:50
Thanks very much for that link. Very useful. The average fee is coming out at $300.00 (184) from that link and the low fee is $200 (122).
I'm thinking that I should ask for 150 then as no one else is banging at my door for these images! lol

Thanks very much for your help.
Best regards,
Jason

TheBrick
26th of May 2011 (Thu), 21:38
I'm sorry, but that is an incredibly stupid response and you are one of the people constantly lowering the value of work.

Hawk's Feather
26th of May 2011 (Thu), 22:45
Jason,

I think you are taking the correct approach to your pricing. You have looked at the high and the low and chosen to split the difference. It could be a good starting point for bringing attention to the images that you have and possibly more sales. I looked at your site and the images are excellent and I am glad that it was you shooting most of them and not me. I am not afraid of snakes, but don't want to be quite as close as you were to most of them.

JaySteel
27th of May 2011 (Fri), 11:23
I'm sorry, but that is an incredibly stupid response and you are one of the people constantly lowering the value of work.

Please explain and justify those insulting comments. I used the link given to me and worked out my price in the middle of the price scale given. Why is that "incredibly stupid"?

Hawk's Feather - Thanks for your response. I too thought my decision was a perfectly rational one. Thanks for checking out my site too.

Best regards,
Jason

sigma pi
27th of May 2011 (Fri), 12:14
I'm sorry, but that is an incredibly stupid response and you are one of the people constantly lowering the value of work.
Yes for an internal memo at a company. You should be charging $2K :rolleyes:

Congrats Jason

ByBrock
27th of May 2011 (Fri), 15:09
Great work! Best of luck!

You want to provide a License for use...

Look for this book:

Richard Weisgrau, Victor Perlman, "Licensing Photography"
Allworth Press NY - 2006 - ISBN: 1581154364 - 208 pages

Charge what you want, but read the book first...

JaySteel
27th of May 2011 (Fri), 15:27
Thanks Sigma Pi & ByBrock for your kind comments. I'll look into that book it's available on Amazon for a reasonable price. Thanks for the recommendation.

Best regards,
Jason

Chris
28th of May 2011 (Sat), 07:16
I really like the 1st shot of the Adder with its tongue out in "Adders 3" . The lighting is nice and its placement on the log is very interesting. How in the world can you take those shots with a 100 macro and not be concerned about them striking at you?

JaySteel
28th of May 2011 (Sat), 13:20
Hi Chris thanks for your reply and thanks for checking out my website. Sometimes the Adders do strike at me but I'm always just out of range. I know exactly how close I can get and the Adders normally know it too. I just make sure that my concentration is at 100% all of the time when I'm photographing these subjects and never get complacent.

Best regards,
Jason

Box Brownie
28th of May 2011 (Sat), 16:01
Hi Jason

Lovely images of our only poisonous native snake :D I have only seen/been close to them on a wet & miserable day when out on a George McCarthy "day" ~ amazing creatures!

However I have a question the settings seem common i.e. as if they were collected and placed, if so I am puzzled because I thought they were a protected species and you had to be licensed to handle them???

JaySteel
28th of May 2011 (Sat), 16:42
Hi Box Brownie, Thanks for your comments.
Many of my adder shots have involved lifting them out into the open to get a clean shot. All the adder photos on my site came from 3 different adder sites and they all have areas of short grass next to the basking spots of the adders. I also tidy up the backgrounds on Photoshop.
I have never 'collected' adders and I have never moved an adder from one site to a more photogenic location either even though it is not illegal I would have serious moral issues with doing so. Handling adders is not an offence in the UK. They are afforded partial protection under the 'Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981'. This means that it is a criminal offence to kill or intentionally harm an adder. It is also an offence to buy or trade them in any way. It is not an offence to handle an adder. Neither is it an offence to keep an adder as long as you have a DWA permit from the local authorities. This level of protection is the same for our grass snakes, viviparous lizards and slow worms.
The smooth snake is our only native snake to be given full protection by the UK law. This means as well as the previous level of protection it is also an offence to handle or in fact disturb smooth snakes in any way without a licence. Sand lizards are also covered by this full protection in the UK.

All this information is on my website to accompany the photographs.

I would not however recommend or condone others handling adders. Not only are they are venomous but they are also easily stressed and too much disturbance may cause them to abandon a site altogether. I consider my actions very carefully before I disturb these beautiful creatures. I keep my photography sessions very short and I've never disturbed any one adder more than once in a year.
I monitor my local sites and the information and data is submitted to my local amphibian & reptile group.

Best regards,
Jason

Box Brownie
28th of May 2011 (Sat), 17:15
Hi Jason

Thanks for the detailed insight :D Sadly reptiles have had a much maligned reputation with AFAIK over the decades all too many Smooth Snakes & Slow worms being mistaken for something dangerous and killed out of hand by uneducated gardeners and walkers who come across them.

Many moons ago I enjoyed visiting a library near Elephant & Castle (at that time the reference sections were allocated by subject to various libraries around London) to read their reference section books on Herpetology ~ many off those tomes were very musty ones but fascinating to learn amongst other things about the different types of venoms and their effects. Would not want to meet a Green Mamba or a Boomslang on a dark night :(

JaySteel
28th of May 2011 (Sat), 17:32
It's the black mambas that scare me simply because of their size & speed combined with the highly potent venom.
My brother-in-law comes from South Africa and he is used to killing ALL snakes on sight. He showed me photos of a supposed green mamba that he killed in his parent's garden when he was back home last summer. When I studied the photo carefully the snake he killed was actually quite harmless.
I finally got him to hold my pet corn snake last time he visited. He was terrified but hopefully he won't automatically see all snakes as an enemy when he comes across them now.

I used to see dead grass snakes regularly near my local alotments. They would usually have their heads chopped off by gardeners who thought they were adders. Threatening these people with prosecution is a waste of time unless you personally catch them in the act. Instead I made up a laminated poster informing them about the presence of harmless grass snakes on their alotments and the protection that they were afforded by the law. I haven't seen any dead ones since thankfully!

Best regards,
Jason

Box Brownie
28th of May 2011 (Sat), 17:44
Ah! SA, we had a lovely safari visit ~ special treat at Shamwari a few years back and there was a Puff Adder alert as we were in a fixed tented type accomodation I made sure to fully turn the bed back before getting in it and made sure not to tell SWMBO about any extra vigilence on my part. We both kept our eyes peeled when moving around the site.

AFAIK there are not many snakes that will actively attack people, most are more concerned to stay out of harms way?

As for the allotmenteers, good for you with educating them properly :D

JaySteel
28th of May 2011 (Sat), 17:55
Thanks. I love snakes but I'd have serious reservations about laying down anywhere that was likely to be visited by venomous snakes during the night! I think it's the Krait in India that kills many people during the night when it enters the house and curls up next to warm humans asleep. When people roll over in their sleep the snake gets squashed and bites its victim with a painless but deadly venom and the victim simply never wakes up!