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kwclay
13th of June 2003 (Fri), 08:23
Good Morning

Just started shooting with Canon gear (recently divorced from Ms. Minolta).

Got a standard double battery charger for the bp-511 batteries. But would like to be able to charge in the car.

What pieces do I need to be able to do this.

Thanks
Ken

Moose Dawg
13th of June 2003 (Fri), 08:42
Hello there. You can buy what's called an inverter at your local Radio Shack or other store like that. It plugs into your lighter and you can run stuff like as big as a tv. The inverters come in different watts from 60 all the way up to 300. I have an ad in front of me from Radio Shack. A 300 watt inverter is on sale for $80 and a 140 watt for $50.

I am planning on buying one for that same purpose of charging while on the road.

Hope this helps,
Dave

kwclay
13th of June 2003 (Fri), 09:01
Thanks Dave,

Any idea how many watts you would need for this job.

Ken

Moose Dawg
13th of June 2003 (Fri), 09:14
I am sure that you would not need a 300 watt one, but I would buy that one so I could use it for other things as well. Plus, the 300 watt has 2 outlets, so you could use maybe a laptop or charge a video camera at the same time. If you have kids, you could use it for their stuff, too. I plan on buying a 300 watt just so I would not have to upgrade later on.

Just an idea,
Dave

RichardSimon
13th of June 2003 (Fri), 11:59
I purchased a pair of high capacity BP-511 equivalent batteries (1300maH instead of 1100maH) and a charger for ~$50 on eBay. This particular charger has the cords to work from both AC (transformer to the charger) and with 12v (car adaptor included) . I have trouble draining even one of these things before I fill my 1GB compactflash card! I leave the charger in my car, and the one that came with the 10D stays at home. No more charger or battery worries for me!

My experience with this particular transaction of eBay was very smooth. The same seller is offering the same thing (e.g., see http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2933548572 )
and there may be others selling similar things as well. I have no affiliation with that vendor.

If you also need a laptop to store the pics, then an inverter might be the way to go. I have one of those as well, couldn't tell you its rating!

ineke
16th of June 2003 (Mon), 20:38
Hi Dave,

Is 140watt enough to run the normal Canon charger?

Dans_D60
16th of June 2003 (Mon), 21:13
ineke wrote:
Hi Dave,

Is 140watt enough to run the normal Canon charger?

Maximum power required for the dual Canon battery charger is 46VA or about 40 WATTS and that’s for the camera connect. Under normal charging conditions I would guess no more than 15 WATTS of input power @100-240 V are needed.
Dan
http://www.pettusphoto.com

gudac
16th of June 2003 (Mon), 22:42
Wal-Mart sells a charger for about $28 that you can use with either the included AC adapter or the Auto adapter.

Makes a great backup and or travel a charger.

It also works with many different types of batteries. Kind of a universal charger!

Steve Barnhart
17th of June 2003 (Tue), 21:05
The single charger that Canon ships uses 26.4 Watts at 120 Volts. I've never seen an inverter that would be too small for this one!

If you already have the charger, find the Amps used on the back of the unit. Multiply by # Volts to find your measurement in Watts.

Example: .22 Amps at 100 Volts = 22 Watts

Dans_D60
17th of June 2003 (Tue), 22:35
Steve Barnhart wrote:
The single charger that Canon ships uses 26.4 Watts at 120 Volts. I've never seen an inverter that would be too small for this one!

If you already have the charger, find the Amps used on the back of the unit. Multiply by # Volts to find your measurement in Watts.

Example: .22 Amps at 100 Volts = 22 Watts
Unfortunately Canon is really trying to be accurate on their battery charger ratings. The 22VA @ 100Volts you see on the charger label is actually 22 VoltAmps or Apparent Power which is the accurate way to describe power requirements in an AC circuit (the power input side). The actual DC heating power – or WATTS – can be a very complex formula. But VA to WATTS for the purpose of this thread is good enough! Therefore 22VA is close enough to 22WATTS!

The following diagram is typical AC resistive/reactive circuit where; Voltage (e), current (i), and power (p).
http://www.pettusphoto.com/power2.jpg

Calculations for different power models:
http://www.pettusphoto.com/power1.jpg

OK .. enough is enough! Just be careful in calculating the required power needed in an AC circuit by the old I=E/R routine ….
Dan
http://www.pettusphoto.com

CyberDyneSystems
17th of June 2003 (Tue), 22:59
Dan the Battery Man!

Thanks for the info Dans_D60 :)