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jfrancho
13th of January 2006 (Fri), 21:59
This is an old friend of mine. He is a one man band. He plays a 7-string guitar, sings, and plays drums with homemade foot triggers. It is quite something to see and hear. Normally I'd say Led Zeppelin covers are taboo, but he did an incredible rendition of "Kashmir."

http://plan-b.smugmug.com/photos/52259055-L.jpg

http://plan-b.smugmug.com/photos/52260876-L.jpg

http://plan-b.smugmug.com/photos/52260696-L.jpg

http://plan-b.smugmug.com/photos/52258677-L.jpg

http://plan-b.smugmug.com/photos/52257566-L.jpg

Carzee
13th of January 2006 (Fri), 22:06
He does Kashmir on his own? I'd like to hear that.

jfrancho
13th of January 2006 (Fri), 22:11
I'm trying to find his MySpace site. I'll have to call him up. It was rediculous. He must have sampled Bonzo's drums right from the vinyl, because the tone was dead on. It wasn't that it was a *perfect* rendition, but he was able to transmit the driving power, authority, and polyrhythmic feel. I'll update you if I can find some music online.

Carzee
13th of January 2006 (Fri), 22:13
I was thinking I might try shooting a garage band at practice, for experience, How do you start in on bands and stage shooting?

jfrancho
13th of January 2006 (Fri), 22:18
I've been playing clubs in various bands since I was 16, and I realized I had all these memories, and nothing to show for it. So I decided to photograph the bands I went out to see. Like anything else, experience slowly leads to success. I still have a lot to learn, but I'm starting to pick up some paying customers. There still bands that I'd never charge for, like Gaylord - I used to be in that band, and they are my test subjects for trying out new things.

Carzee
13th of January 2006 (Fri), 22:21
For the right look -for the stage light cxolours etc - you can't use flash I presume, so you use a low light prime and a monopod? What are the basics?

jfrancho
13th of January 2006 (Fri), 22:33
I'm actually looking to add a flash to my bag of tricks - mostly for monochrome stuff. Generally, though it isn't recommended as it kills the 'mood' or is forbidden in the venue. I don't have any such restrictions. Fast primes are a must. I shoot wide open, and usually at about 1/40 (soft) - 1/80 (not that sharp) and iso 800-3200. Sometimes you can squeak by with ISO 400, if the lights are really bright. I don't use a monopod. I tried once, but it was too cumbersome. I shoot a lot of extreme angles, and find myself in weird positions, but almost always have three points braced against something solid. Foot up on the edge of the stage, another on the floor, and an elbow resting on a monitor or wall. If you can eliminate camera shake, then you just have to catch the performer in the right spot. Burst mode helps with this. Many times the first in a burst series is soft, but the next two are solid. Check out the Dwight McCann Stick in the Talk category, and do a search for "live music" with the quotes, for more info and examples.

DwightMcCann
22nd of January 2006 (Sun), 18:53
Ah, thank goodness for Performing Arts! I missed this. Not one of your better technical threads but very interesting.

Carzee, you might want to go over to Talking About Photography and skim over my Q&A there for some sense of shooting bands.

jfrancho
22nd of January 2006 (Sun), 18:58
No, I agree, shots from this club never come out real sharp when I use available light. This is the place that has cheesy track lighting with colored lightbulbs. I keep forgetting to take a picture of them, as a contrast to stadium or casino lighting that we see here!

DwightMcCann
22nd of January 2006 (Sun), 19:04
Ah, yes, I remember you remarking on it before. What's the story on seven string guitars?

jfrancho
22nd of January 2006 (Sun), 19:10
I'm not sure who started the 7-string madness, but some of the numetal bands have popularized them with alternate tunings and really low range. Bernie makes use of it filling out the bottom end, lacking a bass player.

Steve Parr
25th of January 2006 (Wed), 07:47
He does Kashmir on his own? I'd like to hear that.

"Kashmir" is the finest Zeppelin song goin', in my book.

Looks like the lighting was a bit of a challenge. Would've been nice to get some full body shots. The third picture, considering that he's a one-man band, I think would be great without the stuff in the back ground, or at least blurred a bit...

Steve

jfrancho
25th of January 2006 (Wed), 08:26
I have never understood when performers leave all their 'crap' laying around the stage when they are performing. I realize this isn't Carnegie Hall, but professionalism needs to start here. My boy Bernie here even left the hand truck in front of the stage! I moved that as it really annoying. I shot these wide open at 1.4, so any blurring would have to be artificially added, not something I like to do. As for full body shot, have two for you:

http://plan-b.smugmug.com/photos/52258165-L.jpg

http://plan-b.smugmug.com/photos/52258012-L.jpg

Steve Parr
25th of January 2006 (Wed), 08:28
I always like shots where the guitarists other guitars can be seen. The only thing I'd do in those last two would be to clone out the dimmer switch...

Steve

jfrancho
25th of January 2006 (Wed), 09:07
That's interesting. I don't usually clone anything out of my live images. I did once, here (http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showpost.php?p=453243&postcount=6), to satisfy a request. I guess it isn't a big deal, it kind of looks like it's growing out of his back in the second picture. I'm curious what others think: is it acceptable to do this?

René Damkot
25th of January 2006 (Wed), 09:40
I think I wouldn't clone it out, just darken it. I find extensive photoshopping not exceptable for these 'reportage' kind shots.
I like the first shots of both series.

jfrancho
25th of January 2006 (Wed), 09:51
René, I'm of the same opinion, though most aren't actually used for reportage purposes. I'm open to anything, so I'll see what I can do later. Thanks.

Steve Parr
25th of January 2006 (Wed), 10:06
That's interesting. I don't usually clone anything out of my live images. I did once, here (http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showpost.php?p=453243&postcount=6), to satisfy a request. I guess it isn't a big deal, it kind of looks like it's growing out of his back in the second picture. I'm curious what others think: is it acceptable to do this?

In my opinion, the picture with the cloned out Exit sign is light years better than the one with it...

Steve

René Damkot
25th of January 2006 (Wed), 10:15
I don't think it's that distracting....

jfrancho
1st of February 2006 (Wed), 20:11
I've come to embrace the ubiquitous exit sign, some of my recent shots use it as part of the composition.

DwightMcCann
1st of February 2006 (Wed), 20:44
I hate those white towels that they hang all over their equipment ... they must really sweat like pigs to need two or three bath towels! They are particularly bad because they are washed with fluorescing agents to make the "whiter", which is terrible when a spotlight hits them. I have cloned out a few of them. The world class talent generally has them, but several laid flat on some surface ... they use them once and throw them to someone off stage. Of course, some of them make up for this neatness by having half a dozen water bottles each stacked in plain view. A few even have water bottle holders attached to their music/microphone stands! I guess I also dislike the current vogue of dressing in their gardening worn jeans and untucked shirts and all members dressed to clash as much as possible or look like street urchins! I like the classier acts who dress as a group and demonstrate respect for their audiences by looking professional. I am an old fogey!

jfrancho
1st of February 2006 (Wed), 21:46
Yeah, you are. J/K!
Personally, I have to agree with you. I'm not a big fan of coordinated costumes, or bloody makeup, but I feel most comfortable wearing a pressed white shirt, tie, and khakis when I play. I think it's a little funny that I look like just like another guy from the office showing up to see the band...but wait, I'm in the band. I figure, it's the way I dress anyway, so I might as well be comfortable.

blackshadow
7th of February 2006 (Tue), 15:38
Ah, yes, I remember you remarking on it before. What's the story on seven string guitars?I think Steve Vai was one of the guitarists who started using a 7 string in the 80s.