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Brad_T
31st of January 2006 (Tue), 02:35
I am fairly new to the photography world (about a year now) and I mainly focus on live music photography. These are shots of two West Aussie acts from last year, Carus and Saritah. I have a lot more photos up at www.livemphotography.com (http://www.livemphotography.com) if anyone has some spare time to check them out - I would love to get some feedback, and some constructive criticism would be great as there are some absolutely fantastic photographers on this site.

Peace,

Brad.

http://www.livemphotography.com/photos/carus/2005-11-12/009.jpg

http://www.livemphotography.com/photos/carus/2005-11-12/010.jpg

http://www.livemphotography.com/photos/carus/2005-11-12/011.jpg

http://www.livemphotography.com/photos/carus/2005-11-12/012.jpg

http://www.livemphotography.com/photos/carus/2005-11-12/014.jpg

http://www.livemphotography.com/photos/saritah/2005-10-28/001.jpg

http://www.livemphotography.com/photos/saritah/2005-10-28/009.jpg

http://www.livemphotography.com/photos/saritah/2005-10-28/008.jpg

http://www.livemphotography.com/photos/saritah/2005-10-28/013.jpg

scotgasch
31st of January 2006 (Tue), 02:42
very nice...i like them

DwightMcCann
31st of January 2006 (Tue), 18:31
Welcome to POTN! I think your pictures are pretty nice ... the people are certainly interesting to look at. One of the things we try to avoid in this genre is clipping off the heads of the guitars whenever possible. Also, with almost all "people" photography, whether performing arts or sports (or weddings I suppose) you need to think FACES, Faces, faces: not only should they be in the image, but they should be the sharpest thing. When I shoot faces I always try to focus on the nearest eye.

Brad_T
31st of January 2006 (Tue), 19:38
Cheers for the advice! I will keep those pointers in mind when I take my next shots. The photos are all as is - there is no cropping or photoshopping on any of them. I guess the hardest thing with live music is the venues are generally dark and the people are moving around a lot so you are trying to wait for them to be remotely still and the lights to flash to something useable so you can take the shot (I avoid flash like the plague), so that leaves not much time to frame your shot.

With the focus on the face, is the best thing to do to set the camera to focus in the middle focus point, then focus on the face, and then reframe the shot? The only problem I have with that is trying to reframe the camera quickly when image stabilisation is on (which it generally always is).

DwightMcCann
31st of January 2006 (Tue), 19:53
OK, you asked for it! :-) We need to know what equipment you are using, including body and lens (if not a P&S), as well as technicals (ISO, Aperture, shutterspeed, focal length) and the like. You can also go read an ongoing thread over in Talk About Photography at http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=81761 and spend a lot of time looking at the better and more prolific authors in Performing Arts: off the top of my head I would suggest Rockslut (really very nice), Steve Parr, Eric Konieczny, Mike Goat, jfrancho, earplugsrequired (a lady) and René Damkot ... all of them will answer any questions about how they perform their digital magic. And yes, that IS does have its own little quirks ... first time I ran into that I couldn't figure out what the heck was going on! :-) I would suggest using one of the off-center focus points.

Curtis N
31st of January 2006 (Tue), 20:04
I guess it's true that you can loose your shirt in the music business. ;)

Nice shots!

Brad_T
31st of January 2006 (Tue), 20:32
I am using canon 350D, EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM (I have another travel lens EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM but I don't often use it for live photography).

My standard shooting procedure for a dark venue (which is most of them) is to leave the aperture wide open, image stabilisation on, quite often zoomed towards the long end, 1600 ISO (strangley enough the photos actually end up quite noise free - well a lot less than when I started at the beginning of last year shooting with film).

Cheers for the heads up on who to look out for. I have already started the arduous task of trawling through all the old threads to try and find tips and examples of good photos. :)

Steve Parr
31st of January 2006 (Tue), 21:00
I am using canon 350D, EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM (I have another travel lens EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM but I don't often use it for live photography).

My standard shooting procedure for a dark venue (which is most of them) is to leave the aperture wide open, image stabilisation on, quite often zoomed towards the long end, 1600 ISO (strangley enough the photos actually end up quite noise free - well a lot less than when I started at the beginning of last year shooting with film).

Cheers for the heads up on who to look out for. I have already started the arduous task of trawling through all the old threads to try and find tips and examples of good photos. :)

Speed is good.

You'll find that you'll want to eventually get some faster lenses; f/2.8 or, better yet, some f/1.8's. Even with the relatively noise-free performance of the 350D at ISO1600, you'll find that, with faster lenses, an ISO of 800 will more than get the job done.

The composition in your photos, for the most part, remains constant. Mix it up a little. Try for some full-body shots, wide shots, shots of the whole band, stuff like that...

Steve