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View Full Version : Sensor cleaning for 350D takes too long?


350D_Noob
9th of February 2006 (Thu), 18:56
Well, I tried cleaning the sensor using the cleaning thing that's built in and it was taking a while! Well, it seemed to be about 5 minutes before i turned it off. How long is it suppose to last? I havn't cleaned it before and I was jsut curious how long it's suppose to take. Thanks in advance!

cdifoto
9th of February 2006 (Thu), 18:58
Sensor cleaning doesn't mean it cleans itself. You use that so the mirror and shutter curtains move out of the way so you can clean the sensor with a swab or pec-pad or just blow it off with a blower bulb.

RandyMN
9th of February 2006 (Thu), 19:01
That's pretty funny! I wish mine would clean itself. I can't remember what camera it is but the sensor actually does blow a burst of air to clean itself each time a shot is taken.

JesseJames
9th of February 2006 (Thu), 19:49
Now I dont feel so daft.....not too long ago, I too sat and watched my XT as it "cleaned itself", wondering when it would be completed. I reread the manual twice and still thought I was right..lol..........but now I own a blower and a brush set

SwitchStance
9th of February 2006 (Thu), 20:52
I could see how someone would be easily confused by this. It did make me smile though. :D

JDrex05
9th of February 2006 (Thu), 20:56
That's pretty funny! I wish mine would clean itself. I can't remember what camera it is but the sensor actually does blow a burst of air to clean itself each time a shot is taken.
I cant remember either, but its not a puff of air, but the sensor actually vibrates for a brief period at a high frequency to dislodge anything on it.

cdifoto
9th of February 2006 (Thu), 21:02
You're talking about the Olympus Evolt series. The E-300 and E-500 have sensor vibration technology to *shake* off the dust.

L Kyle
9th of February 2006 (Thu), 22:22
Self cleaning would be great, but I would settle for clean. I attempted to clean my rebel xt today. I am not sure any of the dust is gone :( , but some of it moved :lol: . I may end up letting Canon clean the camera for me (I'm still under warranty with the XT) and I have a trip coming up in late March.

350D_Noob
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 01:39
OHH ok I get it now! hahah

R Hardman
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 02:01
We all start somewhere...

Spencerj
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 03:13
Yep, its the sign of a good forum when you make a mistake and you dont get roasted... just goes to prove how friendly this place is.

JennF
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 12:04
Yep, its the sign of a good forum when you make a mistake and you dont get roasted... just goes to prove how friendly this place is.

I was going to say the same thing! This is my first post here, and on the *other* Canon forum I'm on you'd get eaten alive for a question like that!

So glad I found this place!

Jon
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 12:30
I was going to say the same thing! This is my first post here, and on the *other* Canon forum I'm on you'd get eaten alive for a question like that!

So glad I found this place!
What "other" Canon forum? This is the only Canon forum! Anything else is a pale shadow.
:{)#

Hellashot
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 12:31
Wow.

JennF
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 13:35
This is the only Canon forum! Anything else is a pale shadow.
:{)#

I'm finding that out!! ;)

duncanidaho332
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 14:29
Has anyone got any tips on sensor cleaning?

I find it a complete nightmare :( I'm using a 1Ds Mark II and my sensor needs cleaning every couple of days of serious shooting. Yet when I tell this to other digital camera users, they look at me like I'm crazy.

Someone told me the way to find out if your sensor is grubby is photograph the sky and examine the results on a large monitor - not the camera LCD (its just too small). What they didn't say, and what makes a *HUGE* difference is the f stop you use. Have the lens wide open and you'll see nothing. Stop down to f/22 and the dust stands out like... well... like only dust on a sensor can stand out.

Yes, before you ask, I change lenses a lot AND I like to stop down when I can. I read (on luminous landscape, I think) that its best to switch the camera off before changing lenses. I do this religiously, but it doesn't make a difference - that dratted sensor still gets filthy.

I've bought Eclipse cleaning fluid and some EXTREMELY expensive cotton swabs (about 2 GBP a time!). I usually use one of those - well soaked - first. Then I follow up with a Visible Dust brush blown with a tin of air. Then when the results of that are so awful I try another swab, with more cleaning fluid. After a good half to three quarters of an hour I usually give up and make do with whatever dust is left by then.

One whole flaw in the equation is you can't take Eclipse cleaning fluid on a plane - either in hand luggage or in hold luggage. Yes, its inflammable.
What do other people do about this?

Any comments welcome.


Tony.

joayne
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 14:48
Has anyone got any tips on sensor cleaning?
Tony.

http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning

:cool:
joayne

BIGTUFFGUY
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 14:55
when i saw this thread i was so happy. i thought the 350 did have a self cleaning option!!!

i guess its back to the blower for me!

ddelallata
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 14:56
:lol: enough said. Welcome to the board.

creighton
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 15:13
Self cleaning would be great, but I would settle for clean. I attempted to clean my rebel xt today. I am not sure any of the dust is gone :( , but some of it moved :lol: . I may end up letting Canon clean the camera for me (I'm still under warranty with the XT) and I have a trip coming up in late March.

Don't expect too much if you send it to Canon for cleaning. It may come back cleaner than when it left your possession, then it again it may not. I recently received my camera back from Canon after having the LCD repaired and the service receipt indicated they had also cleaned the CMOS. Suffice it to say there was more dust on the sensor when I received it back than before I sent it in. I say the only sure method is to do it yourself.

Jon
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 16:12
Has anyone got any tips on sensor cleaning?

I find it a complete nightmare :( I'm using a 1Ds Mark II and my sensor needs cleaning every couple of days of serious shooting. Yet when I tell this to other digital camera users, they look at me like I'm crazy.

Someone told me the way to find out if your sensor is grubby is photograph the sky and examine the results on a large monitor - not the camera LCD (its just too small). What they didn't say, and what makes a *HUGE* difference is the f stop you use. Have the lens wide open and you'll see nothing. Stop down to f/22 and the dust stands out like... well... like only dust on a sensor can stand out.

Yes, before you ask, I change lenses a lot AND I like to stop down when I can. I read (on luminous landscape, I think) that its best to switch the camera off before changing lenses. I do this religiously, but it doesn't make a difference - that dratted sensor still gets filthy.

I've bought Eclipse cleaning fluid and some EXTREMELY expensive cotton swabs (about 2 GBP a time!). I usually use one of those - well soaked - first. Then I follow up with a Visible Dust brush blown with a tin of air. Then when the results of that are so awful I try another swab, with more cleaning fluid. After a good half to three quarters of an hour I usually give up and make do with whatever dust is left by then.

One whole flaw in the equation is you can't take Eclipse cleaning fluid on a plane - either in hand luggage or in hold luggage. Yes, its inflammable.
What do other people do about this?

Any comments welcome.


Tony.
I think if I were you, I'd reverse the sequence. Use a blower (Giottos Rocket, say) first to get rid of the loose stuff, then see what the brush can do with whatever's left. Only then move to the liquid, since when you do the liquid first it's possible that it'll help loose bits stick to the sensor cover glass better by acting as a solvent.

Personally, I consider the "shut your camera off when changing lenses so the sensor doesn't attract dust" to be one of digital photography's old wives tales, since the shutter is protecting the sensor during the lens change. The only time the charged sensor is exposed to the mirror box is when you're taking a picture, and I don't know too many people who change lenses then.

I infer from your name that you're in Idaho. That's a moderately arid area, and this is especially a problem in the winter, so the dry conditions you're working under are custom-made for getting lots of dust in the air. No guarantees, but an old-fashioned changing bag used only to change lenses might reduce airborne dust getting into the system, although it'll be a real nuisance to work with.

Hellashot
10th of February 2006 (Fri), 23:22
What "other" Canon forum? This is the only Canon forum! Anything else is a pale shadow.
:{)#

www.dpreview.com has great forums for all of your needs. I spend more time there than here since I basically see the same questions over and over on here.

L Kyle
11th of February 2006 (Sat), 01:51
Don't expect too much if you send it to Canon for cleaning. It may come back cleaner than when it left your possession, then it again it may not. I recently received my camera back from Canon after having the LCD repaired and the service receipt indicated they had also cleaned the CMOS. Suffice it to say there was more dust on the sensor when I received it back than before I sent it in. I say the only sure method is to do it yourself.

Thanks for the warning. I thought I might have had another issue for them to resolve, but more and more it appears not. :D At this point I am 99.5% sure I wait until at least after my upcoming multiple birthday party March and my end of March trip.

bachscuttler
11th of February 2006 (Sat), 02:12
I have the Giotto rocket blower which is great for redistributing the dust around the internals of the camera :D

My preferred method is a high quality nylon artists' brush kept sealed when not in use. Make sure you thoroughly wash all the 'sizing' off from new and let it thoroughly dry.

Get yourself a can of compressed air and blow the air through the bristles.
This 'charges' the bristles so when you sweep the sensor, the dust particles are attracted to them without risk of electrically damaging the sensor.

If there are stubborn specks on the sensor due to heat/condensation making them adhere, you may have to use one of the 'wet' cleaning methods.

I've had my XT for a year now and have never had to wet clean the sensor.


A good range walkabout lens means your'e not forever swopping lenses in the street and if you do need to swop, point the camera body downwards and work swiftly as you change the lens.

I'm no expert...just passing on what I've picked up on my travels and the above methods have worked well for me.
I haven't had to clean my sensor for over 6 months :)

dicky109
11th of February 2006 (Sat), 02:25
i thought the 350 did have a self cleaning option!!!
That'll be the new Italian version called a Canoly:)

SkipD
11th of February 2006 (Sat), 06:54
Here's how it should be done.... (I can't take credit for the photo, so my apologies to the person who first posted it).

56062

Spencerj
11th of February 2006 (Sat), 08:11
except he is doing one thing wrong... he needs to wash that mop first!;)

FotOz
11th of February 2006 (Sat), 08:36
Sensor cleaning? Have a look here - especially you Aussies!
http://www.cameracheckpoint.com.au/html/digitalservices.html
Sorry - edit time . . .
Try this one as well - - -
http://www.cameracheckpoint.com.au/html/webshop.html

duncanidaho332
13th of February 2006 (Mon), 12:27
bachscuttler My preferred method is a high quality nylon artists' brush kept sealed when not in use. Make sure you thoroughly wash all the 'sizing' off from new and let it thoroughly dry.

Get yourself a can of compressed air and blow the air through the bristles.
This 'charges' the bristles so when you sweep the sensor, the dust particles are attracted to them without risk of electrically damaging the sensor.


This is the way the Visible Dust brush is supposed to work, except I'm beginning to believe mine was a Friday afternoon job and actually disintegrates into a shower of dust every time it gets near my sensor :)

Jon I infer from your name that you're in Idaho.

Ah... actually, no. Duncan Idaho is a character in a book.. well, ok, several books. And a film. And a TV series (which I've never seen on TV, presumably because it was so awful). I'm actually based in London, England.

Thanks for the feedback.


Tony.

pokertable
22nd of August 2006 (Tue), 19:26
how often does the sensor need to be cleaned?

Hermeto
22nd of August 2006 (Tue), 20:00
As often as needed.
When you get sick and tired of cloning out dust bunnies on your photos, itís time to clean it.

TenaCJed
23rd of August 2006 (Wed), 13:01
I use SensorKlean from LensPen, worked good for me the one time i've needed it.

http://www.lenspen.com/?cPath=1&products_id=SK-1&tpid=146

nadtz
23rd of August 2006 (Wed), 21:48
Everyone doesnt know Duncan Idaho from dune?

Jim G
23rd of August 2006 (Wed), 23:07
Everyone doesnt know Duncan Idaho from dune?

Maybe we just don't have enough science fiction buffs here :p

koekeloer
24th of August 2006 (Thu), 09:05
Canon claims that the 400D has a self cleaning sensor....

350D_Noob
26th of August 2006 (Sat), 20:20
From what i've heard, when you turn on the camera, the sensor shakes in order to loosen dust.

Chris1le
26th of August 2006 (Sat), 22:07
I've bought Eclipse cleaning fluid and some EXTREMELY expensive cotton swabs (about 2 GBP a time!). I usually use one of those - well soaked - first. Then I follow up with a Visible Dust brush blown with a tin of air. Then when the results of that are so awful I try another swab, with more cleaning fluid. After a good half to three quarters of an hour I usually give up and make do with whatever dust is left by then

Tony.

The swab should not be "well soaked" Two drops of Eclipse on the swab is all you should need. ;)