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kentakirk
25th of August 2006 (Fri), 14:17
I am looking for a telephoto/zoom lens for taking indoor photos at a swim meet. I cannot use a flash and these girls swim quite fast. I think a 70-200 lens would work. What things should I look for in a lens? I have an EOS Rebel camera.
Thanks.

Tommy
25th of August 2006 (Fri), 14:22
If you can't use a flash, you need as fast a lens as possible. A 70-200 f/2.8 would be good. Both the Canon L and Sigma EX are great lenses.

And welcome to POTN!! :D

Patrick S
25th of August 2006 (Fri), 15:42
Unfortunately, all the lens that are going to do what you want them to do are (relatively) expensive. Examples would include the Sigma APO 70-200mm f2.8 EX DG HSM Lens, which is around $840, and the Canon equivalent will be about $1100.

convergent
25th of August 2006 (Fri), 15:53
You have several things working against you. First off, I believe the Rebel has a crippled AI-Servo mode which can only be enabled in Sports mode. Sports mode assumes you are outside shooting, so you will not be able to bump up the ISO and open up the lens as you'd need to. I don't know if there is a hack or anything to fix this, but I know the original Digital Rebel had this limitation (not the case with the Rebel XT).

Now to the lens choice. If you are fortunate enough to be able to shoot at f/2.8 and get a fast enough shutter speed to stop the action, then the 70-200 f/2.8 would be your only choice. The sigma is pretty decent if you are on a budget, and there is also an older 80-200 f/2.8 that can be had for the $600 price range. New, Canon makes an IS and non-IS version. You don't really need IS for this, but given it will be lens you keep for a long time, the IS is nice to have for other stuff.

I shoot a lot of indoor youth and high school sports, and I almost never find enough light to shoot with a zoom lens. You may want to give some of the primes a shot, depending on how close you can get to the action. The 85mm f/1.8 is pretty reasonably priced and an excellent sports lens. The 135mm f/2 is outstanding and very sharp at f/2. It also works very well with the Canon's 1.4x teleconverter so you could get a 189mm f/3.5 lens with the converter when you needed reach and had more light. Before I got the 200 f/1.8, I used the 135 f/2 a lot for indoor sports. If you can get into the venues now and see what kind of light you have (meter it), that will let you know what would work before you spend money.

fortinaa
25th of August 2006 (Fri), 16:22
I think for a telephoto, your only choice is the 70-200 in the 2.8 variety. Even that is going to be tough around a pool. You'll be at ISO 800 or 1600. The other tough thing is that you'll tend to misfocus on the ropes or the light glares off the water quite a bit unless you shoot tight enough that they don't enter the frame a whole lot. If I can get close enough, I like shooting with the 135F2L.

kentakirk
31st of August 2006 (Thu), 11:44
Thanks to your input I have decided to purchase a canon 70-200mm f/2.8 USM telephoto/zoom lens. To protect my investment I was going to buy a protective lens filter. What do I look for and how much should I need to spend on it?

Jon
31st of August 2006 (Thu), 11:48
Get a good multicoated filter. I use B+W MRC or Hoya HMC/S-HMC filters. Heliopan are also good. Expect to pay around $75-$90 for UV; around double that for a polarizer.

Anders Östberg
31st of August 2006 (Thu), 13:02
The 70-200 should work, though it's slightly short from the side of the pool, you'll just reach the near lanes. I've only tried photographing swimming at one event, I went with all primes because the very low light in this venue. Some of this event was in the daytime which gave me more light through some large windows but later in the day and early night the ISO crept up towards 1600 and the aperture down to wide open. My best shots of individual swimmers were taken with a 300/2.8, and I also used an 85/1.8, a 135/2, as well as a 35/1.4 for a few shots of the start.

Check out this album (http://www.andersostberg.com/fotogalleri/thumbnails.php?album=186) if you want to see some pictures.

Patrick S
31st of August 2006 (Thu), 13:41
Won't a lens filter slow down your shutter speed a little bit? Or is that not true of all filters?

subtle_spectre
31st of August 2006 (Thu), 13:45
The answer to your specific question will be found with the EF135L/2.0...everything else aside.

Tommy
31st of August 2006 (Thu), 13:46
Won't a lens filter slow down your shutter speed a little bit? Or is that not true of all filters?

Not true for ALL filters... ;)

Patrick S
31st of August 2006 (Thu), 13:49
Not true for ALL filters... ;)

I see. Thanks for clarifying that!

twalker294
31st of August 2006 (Thu), 13:53
Thanks to your input I have decided to purchase a canon 70-200mm f/2.8 USM telephoto/zoom lens. To protect my investment I was going to buy a protective lens filter. What do I look for and how much should I need to spend on it?

The lens hood is all the protection you need. Why put a sub-$100 piece of glass on the front of your $1600 lens? Use the hood all the time (which you should anyway to reduce the chances of flare,) and you'll be fine.

Todd

EOS_JD
31st of August 2006 (Thu), 13:55
I have the 70-200 2.8L IS but I'd prefer a 135 f2L for indoor sports work.