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ShutterFever
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 08:12
I am little confused :rolleyes: with different software like digital photo professional, photoshop CS2,iView MediaPro, lightzone, etc.. I already tried all of them.

Which do you recommend one of them for download images to my computer from camera then post processing?

Use DPP then transfer edited RAW photos to photoshop for more accurate before you print photos or save all images in CD / DVD?

Also, which do you recommend me to buy one of good books for how to use PP before final prints and save images in CD / DVD?
What is name of writer if you can recommend me to buy a good book? I plan to check books at Noble and Barnes today. Thanks.

René Damkot
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 08:19
I use a card reader and 'drag and drop' to transfer images, or Image ingester. (http://www.imageingester.com/ImageIngester/index.php) Alternative, with more options, but not free, is PhotoMechanic (http://www.camerabits.com/).
Then I import the folder into iView Media Pro.
I make a selection, which I process in DDP.
The Processed files get opened in Photoshop for further editing (local corrections etc.)
For books: There is one book that gets recommended here over and over, but I don't know by whom it is. IIRC it's called 'real world photoshop'.

ShutterFever
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 08:42
Honestly, I tried iView Media Pro and I am really impressed with it for improved sharper and color correction.

It seem easier and faster processing than use DPP.

However, thank you for your information. I will try to do your trick soon.

René Damkot
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 09:43
I only use iView for catalogueing and sorting...

elTwitcho
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 09:46
I use Adobe Bridge to select the files I want to open in Camera Raw, then I open Camera RAW, and move to Photoshop from there. I'm happy with my workflow

darktiger
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 09:49
I shoot raw, so I use C1 to separate my good/bad shots. Then use CS2 to sharpen.

nicksan
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 10:16
Guys, OK, so after you copy the RAW files to the HDD, and you "edit them in PS" I assume the RAW file is first converted to 16bit TIFF file? Then I guess to share your photos, you would convert to JPEG. (Whatever size/quality is required)

I have a few questions then:


Backing up the RAW file is assumed. I understand that part. But what about TIFF files? They can get very big right? Do you guys typically convert ALL your RAW files to TIFF files? (Or PSD?)
When working in PS using TIFF files, when you work with layers do you always flatten them at the end, or do you leave them? I noticed if I don't flatten, then the file size gets really big!
Do you guys print from TIFF?
OK, so we have RAW, TIFF (or PSD), and JPEG (in various sizes/qualities) generated from the workflow. Do you save all of them to a DVD? I have a 5D and my RAW files are 12MB+. TIFF files come out 75MB+. If I save everything, it looks like I would only be able to store like 50 or 60 images on 1 DVD. Does that sound like the right workflow?
OK, this is where I get confused. After you back it up. If for some reason you need to go back to the image and retouch it, how do you save the changes? Do you create another backup DVD to replace the original one?
Thanks
Nick

CyberDyneSystems
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 10:24
1. A:I always back up the tiff/.psd, otherwise I'm throwing away the work I've done, and time is money.
1. B: I only convert those files that I am going to use to tiff or .psd. the rest remain as RAW or are deleted if there tossers.

2: Flattening depends. If the file is "done" or "Cooked" and I can't see any reason why I'd tweek further I flatten. Sometimes however I leave all layers for future editing, or I save a separate layer for a different look, like a B&W layer rather than a separate file.
Layers add file size, no question. A single Dup layer can double file size.

3. Yes, print from 16 bit tiff or .psd

4. Jpegs I do save, but I keep them totally separate. I never make jpegs any larger than what I am uploading to a gallery (approx 800 pixels wide) and these all go into the "upload" folder.. makes management of a site much easier than digging for them in the rest of my image storage.

5. Interesting question. Usually by the time something is on DVD it's allready "done"
I guess I'd make a new copy of the back up.

René Damkot
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 11:16
Guys, OK, so after you copy the RAW files to the HDD, and you "edit them in PS" I assume the RAW file is first converted to 16bit TIFF file? Then I guess to share your photos, you would convert to JPEG. (Whatever size/quality is required)

I have a few questions then:


Backing up the RAW file is assumed. I understand that part. But what about TIFF files? They can get very big right? Do you guys typically convert ALL your RAW files to TIFF files? (Or PSD?)
When working in PS using TIFF files, when you work with layers do you always flatten them at the end, or do you leave them? I noticed if I don't flatten, then the file size gets really big!
Do you guys print from TIFF?
OK, so we have RAW, TIFF (or PSD), and JPEG (in various sizes/qualities) generated from the workflow. Do you save all of them to a DVD? I have a 5D and my RAW files are 12MB+. TIFF files come out 75MB+. If I save everything, it looks like I would only be able to store like 50 or 60 images on 1 DVD. Does that sound like the right workflow?
OK, this is where I get confused. After you back it up. If for some reason you need to go back to the image and retouch it, how do you save the changes? Do you create another backup DVD to replace the original one?
Thanks
Nick

I hardly ever use 16 bit tiff...
When having a raw to work with, I rather make a few different conversions, and merge them in PS. That way I don't have to make big adjustments in PS, so IMO 16 bit is hardly ever needed.
If the main goal is web output or a smallish print size (mostly) I use 8 bit jpg.
I always backup the RAW, and the layered .psd file. I keep the final output file (smaller jpg or flattened tiff) as well.
If i need an image larger and/or maximum quality, I can just go beck to the RAW, process again as 16 bit tiff, and use the resulting files with the masks / adjustment layers from the original layered psd.

This way, the majority of my work can be done in 8 bit, which speeds up the work a lot, and makes file sizes a lot smaller...
For the occasion I do need 16 bit, I allready gained enough time in the past, to allow a bit of 'double work'.

On point 5: Yes.
If I redo a file, the new version gets backed up pas well.

nicksan
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 11:55
More on Point 5: Yes it makes sense that the new version gets backed up. But where? If you backed up the original before, then you must have a DVD containing that image somewhere. Do you take that DVD, copy the contents to your HDD, replace the file in question with the newest one (Raw, Tiff, Psd, whatever) and then re-burn and then ditch the original and substiture the new DVD as the master backup?

Also can you elaborate on "When having a raw to work with, I rather make a few different conversions, and merge them in PS." What do you exactly mean by this. You also mentioned that if you need to re-do the image from the RAW file you convert to 16bit TIFF, then "apply from ps conversion/layers"??? Can you also explain.

I am sorry about the Q's...pretty new at PP stuff!

René Damkot
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 12:36
Do you take that DVD, copy the contents to your HDD, replace the file in question with the newest one (Raw, Tiff, Psd, whatever) and then re-burn and then ditch the original and substiture the new DVD as the master backup?


No. I just back up the rredone image. Mostly it will be redone for a specific purpose (say for print) so I alter the name to [old name]pr.psd or so...

Also can you elaborate on "When having a raw to work with, I rather make a few different conversions, and merge them in PS." What do you exactly mean by this. You also mentioned that if you need to re-do the image from the RAW file you convert to 16bit TIFF, then "apply from ps conversion/layers"??? Can you also explain.

I am sorry about the Q's...pretty new at PP stuff!

The advantage of 16 bit is that you have more 'steps' in the tonal range of an image. This is a big benefit when doing big curves or color corrections.
If I need to do a big curves or color corection (for a part of the image), I do a seperate raw conversion for that part of the image.

I then 'sandwhich' the two different conversions, and use a layer mask to blend them together.

For instance, when having to open up shadows, I use a method like this (http://www.thelightsrightstudio.com/videos/BlendedExposures.mov)(quicktime movie), rather then use curves or shadow // highlight in a 16 bit file.

Some alternatives: About the same method as in the movie. Described differently. (http://www.astropix.com/HTML/J_DIGIT/LAYMASK.HTM) and another Nice (but long) read. (http://www.naturescapes.net/072006/rh0706_1.htm)

On the second part of the question:
I end up with a layered psd.
I do as much as possible using layer masks and adjustment layers.
Say I have an image of a band on stage.
I use a 'base' conversion for the total image. The singer is in a red spot, so gets a second, less red conversion. I use a mask to reveal the singer in the total image. The drummer is in the dark, so gets a lighter conversion. I use a mask to reveal the drummer. (probabely using the method of the above quicktime movie)

If I have to redo an image, starting from the raw file (for whatever reason, say they want to print a *big* poster), I can still use the layer masks and adjustment layers from the original .psd file. All I have to do is (let the Mac) do the conversions again, and drag and drop the adjustment layers and layer masks from the old file to the new. All I have to do then, is scale the masks to fit the new (larger) image. No problem, since they are blurred anyway.

ShutterFever
23rd of January 2007 (Tue), 16:42
WOW. You guys do your different ways for PP. This is Interesting.