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View Full Version : what is this coffee filter white balance trick


Conor
30th of April 2004 (Fri), 19:28
can someone explain this in detail?

does this always work great? is it something i can done once and forget about?

how do i do this exactly thanks!

PhotosGuy
30th of April 2004 (Fri), 20:08
You can use anything white - preferably a pure white (no tint).
Fill the frame with it & take a pic. Read your manual to set 'custom WB'.
After setting it, you can delete the pic. I keep it because it's a low-res jpg &...
If the lighting changes (like shooting in shadow; or later in the day, etc.) you'll need to do it again. If you return to the original conditions you can just access the 1st WB pic & reset it.

does this always work great?
Yes. I recently read something saying that you should also set WB when shooting RAW.

White balance - good article
http://www.webphotoschool.com/newschool/freelessons/lessons/d560wbIn/index.html

billfranklin
30th of April 2004 (Fri), 20:13
It works like a charm! Set your camera to aperture priority. Place "two" round white coffee filters over your lens and snap a picture. Set camera to custom white balance as described in your manual. This is a lot easier and a lot less expensive that other methods you may have read about. It really does work.

Bill F.

Conor
30th of April 2004 (Fri), 21:07
It works like a charm! Set your camera to aperture priority. Place "two" round white coffee filters over your lens and snap a picture. Set camera to custom white balance as described in your manual. This is a lot easier and a lot less expensive that other methods you may have read about. It really does work.

Bill F.

when u say place 2 filters over hte lens, am i totally blocking the lens with it?

or just shoot a photo of it filling the frame?

thanks!

PhotosGuy
30th of April 2004 (Fri), 21:20
I think, using that method, you block the lens with it. I feel that there may be some 'tinting' as the light passes through the filter - haven't tried it as I only have a percolater!
Still, you can get white paper anywhere, so I use it. Fill the frame with it & take a pic of the light reflected off the paper.

drisley
30th of April 2004 (Fri), 21:38
Ok, so I found 2 used coffee filters in my garbage from this week, placed them over my 70-200 f4L, and followed your directions.
But now, my pictures are all murky and muddy looking....
:oops:

Belmondo
30th of April 2004 (Fri), 21:39
Ok, so I found 2 used coffee filters in my garbage from this week, placed them over my 70-200 f4L, and followed your directions.
But now, my pictures are all murky and muddy looking....
:oops:

Try filters that were used to make decaffeinated coffee. :wink:

billfranklin
1st of May 2004 (Sat), 08:09
OK, I'll try again. Take two of the large white drip coffee filters and place them directly in front of the lens hood. Set the camer lens to manual focus (otherwise the lens will not focus); set camera to apeture priority at wide open; trip the shutter in the room with the light source you will be using. Press the preview buttom to bring up the image of the coffee filter. Next press menu and scroll down to "Custom WB". Press the set button to lock in the custom white balance. Finally go to the lcd screen on top of the camera and set the white balance to custom white balance. This is the bottom icon in the white balance list. When you use this set up, your pictures should not be off color or muddy. Here is a link to my set up with the 24=70 lens and a few pictures I took yesterday using this technique. http://www.photodex.com/sharing/viewalbum.html?alb=77534

Good Luck.

Bill F.

ron chappel
1st of May 2004 (Sat), 15:41
Be real carefull using normal paper,it's extremely inconsistant with it's subtle colout tints!!
I've tried a variety of white objects and while the all kinda work ,none of them were acurate.
The kodack greay card i borrowed from my brother was excellent.

By the way-you can use anything without colour.That means any shade of pure white through grey to black.Just set the camera manually to expose in the middle (so no matter what you are taking it comes out grey)
It's explained in the owners manual

drisley
1st of May 2004 (Sat), 16:02
OK, I'll try again. Take two of the large white drip coffee filters and place them directly in front of the lens hood. Set the camer lens to manual focus (otherwise the lens will not focus); set camera to apeture priority at wide open; trip the shutter in the room with the light source you will be using. Press the preview buttom to bring up the image of the coffee filter. Next press menu and scroll down to "Custom WB". Press the set button to lock in the custom white balance. Finally go to the lcd screen on top of the camera and set the white balance to custom white balance. This is the bottom icon in the white balance list. When you use this set up, your pictures should not be off color or muddy. Here is a link to my set up with the 24=70 lens and a few pictures I took yesterday using this technique. http://www.photodex.com/sharing/viewalbum.html?alb=77534

Good Luck.

Bill F.

If you look carefully, I said I pulled "used" filters out of the garbage hence the muddy appearance.
:lol:

Andy_T
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 03:18
Ok, so I found 2 used coffee filters in my garbage from this week, placed them over my 70-200 f4L, and followed your directions.
But now, my pictures are all murky and muddy looking....
:oops:

Most likely, not just your pictures, but your lens and camera, too :lol:

Best regards,
Andy

Andy_T
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 03:20
kodack greay card

Now, that spelling mistake/letter count ratio marks a new high for this forum ... good thing Bob Gross doesn't seem to be around :lol:

Best regards,
Andy

Belmondo
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 03:58
kodack greay card

Now, that spelling mistake/letter count ratio marks a new high for this forum ... good thing Bob Gross doesn't seem to be around :lol:

Best regards,
Andy

Lighten up, Any. He spelled 'card' right. :)

ron chappel
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 04:45
The thing is i can spell pretty well-i just type faster than i think
...er,hang on-that's not good :oops: :oops: :oops: :lol:


I just tried several houshold items to calibrate CWB for some cheap halogen worklights i want to use as studio lighting
For each try i took a snap of various coloured items to get a rough idea how good each one was.It worked very well! :) :) One of the pics looked very natural and 'clear'

ilya
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 06:44
http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/viewtopic_archives.php?TopicID=64826&page=0

frog5
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 07:32
My main photography work is interiors so white balance has always been a real issue. I used to use a grey card to set WB manually. However I now shoot everything in RAW and process in C1 Rebel software.

WB is now not an issue at all I just set it when processing so it's perfect whatever the lighting. In fact exposure is almost not an issue as this can also be set (within limits) too.

SHOOT RAW and don't ever worry about WB again. Also the comment about having to set WB when shooting RAW is incorrect.

msvadi
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 08:13
One can use anything neutral (red=green=blue) to set WB. I shoot raw, but quite often I use the expo/disc for WB. I shoot a grey frame with it. Sometimes I use it to set custom WB in camera or during conversion or in PS to set grey point. The expo/disc can be used also to set exposure, but I find that in majority of situations in camera meter and the expo/disc are agree (and I want something else ;) )

PhotosGuy
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 12:02
Also the comment about having to set WB when shooting RAW is incorrect.

True, you don't HAVE to. As I recall, the issue concerned color crossover issues which could be eliminated by setting WB before shooting RAW. Maybe someone was measurebating. Maybe not. I set it because I have the time to do it, then I just forget the whole issue when I get to RAW processing.

Andy_T
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 13:39
I think it might be easier to just use the grey card before shooting than trying to remember afterwards what kind of lighting that was and how the colours 'really' looked when you are converting the image.

But that's just my impression.

Best regards,
Andy

frog5
2nd of May 2004 (Sun), 14:12
not sure what you mean about having to remember the colours and lighting afterwards?

When processing the RAW file in software such as C1 Rebel - all you do is set the colour temperature WB to what you like the look of - often the default WB is spot on but i prefer to warm up the pic or cool it down by changing the WB.

If it's absolute colour corectness that you're after then you need to shoot with a colour control patch in the piccie.