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DesertDweller
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 16:33
When using fully automatic on our Canon XTi, the exposure doesn't seem right. Suggestions? I've had some people give recommendations to correct the exposure setting, and I guess I'll have to get out the user's manual to figure out how to do that in auto mode. I didn't expect to have to adjust anything in auto, was I expecting too much?

http://img90.imageshack.us/img90/7480/img8488wj9.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By DesertDweller (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/DesertDweller), shot with Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi (http://profile.imageshack.us/camerabuy.php?model=Canon+EOS+DIGITAL+REBEL+XTi&make=Canon) at 2007-08-11


http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/7967/img8489ln2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
Shot with Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi (http://profile.imageshack.us/camerabuy.php?model=Canon+EOS+DIGITAL+REBEL+XTi&make=Canon) at 2007-08-11

JC4
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:36
They are a bit dark, but that's normal for the XTi. It errors on the side of dark, so you don't blow out the highlights. A little post and these photos can look better.

I adjusted the white balance a bit, increased the exposure(+ 1), and bumped the contrast a bit. Of course if I was working with the original, there would be more detail and this would look better.

JC4
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:39
Here's I gave your 1st shot the same treatment. Your pictures are actually quite nice. They would be better if you used a more manual mode, and/or learn how to make adjustments. I used lightroom, but there are plenty of tools to choose from.

DesertDweller
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:40
It actually looks pretty good to me after your fiddling! I don't mind if I have to do some, but I want to just keep it looking as much like what I saw with my own eyes as possible. What software did you use? All I have is iphoto, and unless I'm missing something, it doesn't let me do as much as I'd like.

Oops, entered before your second post. Obviously lightroom! Our first outing with this camera didn't go well at all - we had a linear polarizer that we were told was circular. Now we aren't using a polarizer at all, it certainly doesn't seem necessary for these shots. Here is an example from our first try with the wrong polarizer:

http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/2866/img8463ed4.jpg
By desertdweller (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/desertdweller), shot with Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi (http://profile.imageshack.us/camerabuy.php?model=Canon+EOS+DIGITAL+REBEL+XTi&make=Canon) at 2007-08-03

dekalbSTEEL
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:41
Agreed, and it looks like you've got some sensor dust as well...

http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/2061/img8488wj9ie0.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

JC4
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:42
Our posts probably overlapped. But, I used LightRoom. iPhoto is pretty limited. You might want to look at PhotoShop Elements. It has a plenty of tools to punch up your photos, and doesn't break the bank.

JohnC

JC4
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:43
Agreed, and it looks like you've got some sensor dust as well...


Maybe it's an OOF bird? :) Shhhhhhh, he's new, don't scare him :)

JohnC

dekalbSTEEL
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:43
Did you load all the software that came with the camera(assuming you bought it new)?

Canon's Digital Photo Professional (DPP) is a very capable program and fairly easy to learn

See the link in my sig

dekalbSTEEL
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:47
from your exif data, I see these were taken at 2 in the afternoon, full sun, that's why Auto stopped your lens all the way down to f16, as the reflected light off the bright rocks was very intense.

DesertDweller
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:47
Did you load all the software that came with the camera(assuming you bought it new)?

Canon's Digital Photo Professional (DPP) is a very capable program and fairly easy to learn

See the link in my sig

My wife is out shopping, and apparently she hid the box! We did buy it new, and I'm sure the software is in there, so I'll give it a try. What can I do about the sensor dust? I thought it was supposed to take care of that with the automatic sensor cleaning?

dekalbSTEEL
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:51
Shoot f8 or faster!

I only use a rocket blower to clean mine, others will give you more detail advice, I'm sure.

DesertDweller
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 17:55
She actually has the camera with her as well. I'll have to get out the manual when I can find it, since I don't even know where the sensor is, let alone what rocket blower is!

dekalbSTEEL
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 18:02
Looks like time to hit the search box, my friend:D

DesertDweller
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 18:04
Yep, a lot of learnin' to do! I think I have a pretty good eye, now I have to work on my fingers! The images I posted here were just some shots I took to test the camera, not really what I'd call my best compositions.

Of course, I'm sure everybody thinks they have a good eye...

Foggy
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 18:07
Hi Desert Dweller,

I read your post from the equipment section on your xti exposure.

Anytime you are taking a picture with a whole lot of sky in it, the exposure meter of your camera would be approximately 2/3 stops underexposed.

You wish to shoot everything in auto as I understand it and don't want to fiddle with images (not yet anyhow).
If in the future you wish to shoot bright skies or compositions with alot of sky I recommend you set the exposure compensation +2/3 to 1 full stop, otherwise everything will look darker - this is normal with Evaluative metering.

If you wish to understand how to make the most of your camera metering, I highly highly recommend Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson. Possibly one of the best starter photography book out there.

DesertDweller
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 18:13
Thanks, I may just have to pick up a copy!

Super-Nicko
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 20:17
hey there, i use adobe cs2 for my image editing but that is more to learn than shooting the camera. just a suggestion for quick and easy editing and an intro to levels/crop/contrast... download google picasa - its free and have a play. if you hit save image, it keeps an original too so you cant bugger it up and lose a good shot.

DesertDweller
11th of August 2007 (Sat), 22:21
They are a bit dark, but that's normal for the XTi. It errors on the side of dark, so you don't blow out the highlights. A little post and these photos can look better.

I adjusted the white balance a bit, increased the exposure(+ 1), and bumped the contrast a bit. Of course if I was working with the original, there would be more detail and this would look better.

After a little looking around, I'd probably take that photo in AV mode, with +1 exposure. Is there a way to adjust the white balance and contrast within the camera, or does that have to be done on the computer?

Medic85
12th of August 2007 (Sun), 09:05
Shoot a grey card before taking your shots and then just adjust the white balance from the grey card when you go to PP the shots.

I would definitely shoot in one of the creative zones instead of full auto. You have much more control of the exposure that way. AV mode is a good one for this shot.

JC4
12th of August 2007 (Sun), 11:00
After a little looking around, I'd probably take that photo in AV mode, with +1 exposure. Is there a way to adjust the white balance and contrast within the camera, or does that have to be done on the computer?

Av mode would be good for that shot. Somewhere between f/7 and f/11. AWB (auto white balance) is pretty close when outside. I only warmed your pictures up a small amount, to my taste. Like above, you can use a grey card, and then use the custom-white-balance setting. But, for me that's a lot of bother. Its easier to do it after. If you shoot raw there is no loss doing it before or after. Even shooting jpg, there isn't much penalty for setting white-balance in post.

I had totally forgotten about DPP, as noted above, it's a very good post tool, and its free.

What I'd do. Keep using iPhoto. Import your photos from the camera directly into iPhoto. It's great for sorting and viewing. Then pick your favorites and adjust them in DPP. Then print, post on the web or share your adjusted photos. Start building a work-flow that works for you.

If you start taking LOTS of pictures, I highly recommend Lightroom or Aperture. Both are excellent at organizing your photos, and making quick adjustments(even batch adjust an entire shoot). I rarely go into more advance software like PhotoShop, lightroom does 98% of what I need to do to my photos.

Edit: I forgot one thing. I always save my original files, and edit/adjust copies. That way you can always get all the detail back if you decide you don't like your adjustments. Lightroom and Aperture do this(preserve the original) for you, so I forgot this step.