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View Full Version : How can I tell how old my camera is?


mikegrasso
1st of November 2007 (Thu), 16:54
So I have some used bodies, and want to know how old they are. Is there a way to tell??

b1gdaddy
1st of November 2007 (Thu), 17:01
Cut them in half & count the rings ;)

I should imagine the serial numbers will hold the age, ask Canon? :confused:

imageswest
1st of November 2007 (Thu), 17:05
A lot of the camera bodies have a date code (just like the lenses have) stamped somewhere - try looking inside the battery compartment for starters.

Dan-o
1st of November 2007 (Thu), 17:10
Cut them in half & count the rings


Wow that was going to me sarcastic comment.

mikegrasso
1st of November 2007 (Thu), 17:16
Are the serial numbers coded some how?

Hermeto
1st of November 2007 (Thu), 20:07
Are the serial numbers coded some how?

It is written on the plate thatís attached to the bottom of the camera.
Just turn it upside down and youíll see it.

20droger
2nd of November 2007 (Fri), 12:52
Cut them in half & count the rings ;)
That only works with round things, like lenses. "L" lenses have very pronounced rings.

Bodies, being built like a rock, require carbon dating.

Crossfire
2nd of November 2007 (Fri), 13:53
I know that inside the battery compartment of the MkIII there is a date code.

mikegrasso
2nd of November 2007 (Fri), 14:32
I looked and ther is no date stamp, I guess I just have to call Canon.

PaulB
2nd of November 2007 (Fri), 15:58
That only works with round things, like lenses. "L" lenses have very pronounced rings.

Bodies, being built like a rock, require carbon dating.

Sorry you can't carbon date the rock used to make Canon DSLR camera bodies, you have to use potassium/argon dating for igneous rock - are not Canon DSLRs (1 series anyway) forged in the fires at the centre of the Earth!. Carbon dating can be used however on 'young' (50,000 years or less) sedimentary rock but this is only likely to be found in non-digital SLRs and P&S cameras - it's a cost thing I suppose.

As for dating the rings in L lenses, a less destructive way would be to drill a core out from one side to the centre - this leaves the lens in one piece and only affects half the image.

20droger
2nd of November 2007 (Fri), 18:12
Sorry you can't carbon date the rock used to make Canon DSLR camera bodies, you have to use potassium/argon dating for igneous rock - are not Canon DSLRs (1 series anyway) forged in the fires at the centre of the Earth!. Carbon dating can be used however on 'young' (50,000 years or less) sedimentary rock but this is only likely to be found in non-digital SLRs and P&S cameras - it's a cost thing I suppose.

As for dating the rings in L lenses, a less destructive way would be to drill a core out from one side to the centre - this leaves the lens in one piece and only affects half the image.
No. They're forged in the fires of Mount Doom, which in Japan is called Fujiyama.

flareak
3rd of November 2007 (Sat), 05:09
Fujiyama = Fujisan?

I Simonius
3rd of November 2007 (Sat), 05:46
No. They're forged in the fires of Mount Doom,

If they're forged shouldn't someone report it?:p

RichSoansPhotos
3rd of November 2007 (Sat), 09:05
So I have some used bodies, and want to know how old they are. Is there a way to tell??


look on your receipts

Tyreman
3rd of November 2007 (Sat), 09:11
So I have some used bodies, and want to know how old they are. Is there a way to tell??

There are sites that can give you the dates the bodies were made betwen aka say 1990 to 1993.
additionally some model bodies may be marketed to different countries using differing model numbers. one such site with more canon info:
http://www.eosdoc.com/manuals/?q=Bodies

there are other sites too.
I just showed one example not the best not the worst.

20droger
3rd of November 2007 (Sat), 14:30
One simple approximation can be found by going to the Canon Museum (http://www.canon.com/camera-museum/index.html). There you can find the dates cameras and lenses were released, along with lots of other interesting info.

vic6string
3rd of November 2007 (Sat), 17:31
So I have some used bodies, and want to know how old they are. Is there a way to tell??

That's easy.... at it's next birthday party, just count the candles on the cake.