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Dork Knight
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 02:54
Hello All,

I'm considering a Macro Lens purchase next week, although this may not happen as there's a possibility I will lose my job, but if not (hopefully not) I would like to purchase something like the Canon EF 100mm Macro or the Sigma 150mm Macro.

The lens will be used with my 400D/XTi and they are both around the same sort of price at the moment (40 difference), however, Canon are also offering 40 Cashback on the lens so this would bring the difference to around the 80 area.

As I see it:

Canon is lighter by nearly 300g,
Canon has a shorter focusing distance of nearly eight centimetres

Sigma is 150mm over Canons 100mm,
Sigma comes with a hood and tripod ring

I've only had a brief attempt at macro, which I enjoyed, using my fathers EF-S 60mm - So I have very little knowledge about this stuff.

A couple of questions if people have the time;

1. If people have owned both which do you prefer and why?
2. Hand held macro work, how successful would this be with the heavier Sigma (or even if this would be possible/successful with the Canon)?
3. Would the Canon Macro Lites fit the Sigma?
4. Any thoughts, whatever they may be on these two lenses?

Thank You,

Jason

SurplusCorn
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 06:51
I have the Canon, and I absolutely love it. Hand-holding is difficult as it is with macro shots, so having a heavier lens would make it that much more difficult. The quality on the Canon is nearly 'L' quality as well, though I don't have any experience with the Sigma. Not getting the hood and ring is unfortunate, but not a deal breaker IMO. The hood was only €30 for me, and I just use my tripod as normal when I have it mounted; I don't worry too much about the ring.

steved110
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 07:36
I've just bought myself a 100mm macro, i chose the Canon one, and I am delighted with it. I rented one recently to test it out, and was pleased so decided to spring for it.

I bought from Kerso on ebay - his store is called Flash Camera. 299 delivered by Special Delivery, into my sweaty little paws within 36 hours of paypalling. If you email him and deal off ebay and pay with a bank transfer he drops the price accordingly. And I believe it's still eligible for the 40 cashback from Canon - I'll certainly give it a go.

There is also an ebay store called emilyandlily which are cheaper still but use CityLink tto deliver and I have had bad experiences with them - at least with Sd you know they deliver before 1pm so you have half the day left to plan stuff!

anyway good luck with your job. May be it's time to start looking for another one before the redundancy arrives?

Dork Knight
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 09:01
Thanks for the info both.

I've purchased from Kerso previously and I've been happy with his service (although I didn't know you could deal with him outside of eBay, so that's good to know), I've also been keeping an eye on Camera Price Buster to see how the prices are.

I may be swinging towards the Canon at the moment with the saving and Cashback being used on a Protector for the lens and a Flash Bracket - Of course depending on circumstances next week.

ben_r_
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 09:09
Go with the Canon, you will not be disappointed!

Tony-S
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 09:12
I'm considering a Macro Lens purchase next week, although this may not happen as there's a possibility I will lose my job,

Jason, I sure hope this doesn't happen!

but if not (hopefully not) I would like to purchase something like the Canon EF 100mm Macro or the Sigma 150mm Macro.

I think the most important thing we need to know is what are your intended subjects? There are advantages to either focal length, depending on whether subjects are static.

Dork Knight
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 09:29
Thanks Tony - I really hope I'm safe, I've worked thirteen years to get to where I am and it would be terrible to lose everything now; Anyway..

I've only briefly played about with Macro using an EF-S 60mm, the results of the attempt can be seen in the following thread;
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=464601

I would like to attempt similar, I think this is just at the playing around stage for me, followed by photographing flowers and possibly moving to insects. I have to admit I really don't like bugs and I really -REALLY- don't like spiders, however, I'm truly enjoying the pictures of insects and whatnot posted in the Macro Photo Sharing section (perhaps this could push me to overcome my issue of creepy crawlies).

Thank You,

Jason

mikeb540
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 09:46
i was looking at the canon lense the other night, im trying to decide if i want to go with a macro or a big zoom for birds and other wildlife. i only have the pop up flash on my xti aswell, so that may have to change first before a new lense. cant wait to see pics from which ever you choose.
mike

Tony-S
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 11:19
I've only briefly played about with Macro using an EF-S 60mm, the results of the attempt can be seen in the following thread;
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=464601

I would like to attempt similar, I think this is just at the playing around stage for me, followed by photographing flowers and possibly moving to insects. I have to admit I really don't like bugs and I really -REALLY- don't like spiders, however, I'm truly enjoying the pictures of insects and whatnot posted in the Macro Photo Sharing section (perhaps this could push me to overcome my issue of creepy crawlies).

The shorter ones (EF-S 60mm and Sigma 70mm) have the advantage of greater dof at a given aperture and better shutter speeds relative to the longer lenses. The longer FLs give you that working distance to keep you safely away from those Brown Recluses and Black Widows. :)

gasrocks
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 11:30
For blurring the background, for perspective, for more comfortable working distance - the longer the lens, the better. Get the SIgma 150. I sold my Canon 100 macro after getting the 150 since I just didn't use the Canon anymore.

Dork Knight
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 11:31
The longer FLs give you that working distance to keep you safely away from those Brown Recluses and Black Widows. :)

*shudder*

So I need a super dooper long lens to keep them at arms length then ;)

For blurring the background, for perspective, for more comfortable working distance - the longer the lens, the better.

Hmm, so the Sigma 150mm would definitely be the one to perhaps better the Canon 100mm in these areas (and in similar price range).

medic-on-fire
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 11:38
I love my Canon 100 macro! It's probably the sharpest glass I have. It has quickly become one of my favorites to use. I've had great luck using the lens in portrait photography as well...I don't think you would be disappointed one bit!

Jman13
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 11:42
The shorter ones (EF-S 60mm and Sigma 70mm) have the advantage of greater dof at a given aperture

No, they don't. At the same magnification, any macro lens will have the same depth of field for the same aperture. That's because the distance to the subject will be further for a longer lens by the same amount that the focal length increases. Thus, the DOF is identical. The longer focal length will give a more diffuse background because less of the BG is included in the photo, but the amount that is sharp is identical between them.

Dork Knight
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 11:45
but the amount that is sharp is identical between them.

Would that be the Canon 100mm and Sigma 150mm?

If so I think the sensible option would be the Sigma 150mm - Would others agree?

Jman13
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 11:51
I was referring to the depth of field.

As far as image quality goes, I highly doubt you'll find that one is superior to the other...they are both spectacularly sharp macro lenses. I love my Sigma 150, but the Canon 100 is also a wonderful optic...I'd say it boils down to the focal length you want.

Kuma
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 11:57
*shudder*

So I need a super dooper long lens to keep them at arms length

...with a built-in safety shield.

gasrocks
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 12:24
Best "macro" lens for butterflies, dragonflies and most flowers is the EF 300/4 L IS lens.

Lester Wareham
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 12:42
Hello All,

I'm considering a Macro Lens purchase next week, although this may not happen as there's a possibility I will lose my job, but if not (hopefully not) I would like to purchase something like the Canon EF 100mm Macro or the Sigma 150mm Macro.

The lens will be used with my 400D/XTi and they are both around the same sort of price at the moment (40 difference), however, Canon are also offering 40 Cashback on the lens so this would bring the difference to around the 80 area.

As I see it:

Canon is lighter by nearly 300g,
Canon has a shorter focusing distance of nearly eight centimetres

Sigma is 150mm over Canons 100mm,
Sigma comes with a hood and tripod ring

I've only had a brief attempt at macro, which I enjoyed, using my fathers EF-S 60mm - So I have very little knowledge about this stuff.

A couple of questions if people have the time;

1. If people have owned both which do you prefer and why?
2. Hand held macro work, how successful would this be with the heavier Sigma (or even if this would be possible/successful with the Canon)?
3. Would the Canon Macro Lites fit the Sigma?
4. Any thoughts, whatever they may be on these two lenses?

Thank You,

Jason

Try reading this for background http://www.zen20934.zen.co.uk/photography/Macro_Equipment.htm

In answer to your questions as far as I can.

1. Have not owned both (I use the 100mm MP-E 65mm and may get the 180mm at some point). My slant is the 150mm is neither of the standard lengths of 100mm (great for handheld) or 180mm (great for tripod). So an oversimplification, but you can either consider it as none optimum for either or the best of both worlds depending on how you feel.

2. Yes handheld is very successful with the Canon 100mm, with ambient light if good enough, else with flash. The 150mm is heavier and this is significant because you will be trying to hold the lens still to fractions of a mm in possibly quite awkward positions (for insect photography). In addition to the camera and lens you may well have flash, weight is a big issue. (I use the MT-24EX twin flash)

3. The Canon macro flashes fit on via a little lip on the lens, but there are microlight adaptors you can use to adapt non-macro/non-Canon lenses. These screw in the filter thread and come in 52, 58 and 72mm threads.

4. Both lenses have a good reputation. I would say generally the 100mm gives plenty of room for most insects. For those that are really sensitive like dragonflies 150mm will not make much difference. Although you can photograph these sort of subject using the 100mm it is often more productive to use a 200 or 300mm lens on tubes, specially as they are often on marshland where you can't get close to them anyway without getting wet!

Don't let the lack of a tripod ring and hood be a factor in your decision. A tripod ring is useful if doing a lot of tripod work on the 100mm but it is light enough to just use the camera L-bracket to the ring is just a convenience. Most of the time I don't fit it. But do get a hood and use it.

Dork Knight
6th of March 2008 (Thu), 13:07
Excellent - Thank You,

Jason