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LBaldwin
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 05:08
I was wondering do you birders use any kind of bait to get the smaller birds?
My wife bought me some suet and a holder and I don't want to "cheat" as it were. But getting them into one small area proves difficult.

Your thoughts or techniques in this area would be appreciated.

Duane N
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 05:14
I'm no expert in bird photography but when I used my 70-200 f/4 lens I had to bait them. Not really baiting them...I had feeders set up anyway and placed select branches around the feeder for the smaller birds to land on before hitting the feeder. That's when I took my shots.

Now that I purchased the 400 f/5.6 I don't do this very often because I don't need them closer....I actually have to move back which is nice. :D

*If there was only a way to bait the Red Tailed Hawks to come to my yard without killing anything or upsetting my neighbors I'd do it in a heartbeat. ;):lol:

oldtimingman
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 05:57
Does 14 feeders and 8 nesting boxes count as bait? :D


...............old

wlaramie
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 06:15
I have feeders on my deck and have had good luck placing a tree branch between two of the feeders to give the birds something to land on. This has produced some good results for me.
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=339412&highlight=wlaramie

S.Horton
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 06:25
Do you mean for birds of prey making a kill?

sugarzebra
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 08:35
Hi Les,
We have a couple of feeders at our home and and quite a few more at the cottage. The trick is to also put perching sticks near the feeders so that you can get good shots of the birds without including the feeders in the photo. Position the perching sticks so that you can create nice BG's & optimal lighting conditions in the morning & evening from where you will be positioned to work from.

Its interesting that most people reserve the word baiting for reference to using live bait to attract birds of prey, however I'm pretty sure the Coopers hawk that frequents our back yard does so because of the feeder :) Its all a matter of degree!

Richtherookie
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 08:52
I'm no expert in bird photography but when I used my 70-200 f/4 lens I had to bait them. Not really baiting them...I had feeders set up anyway and placed select branches around the feeder for the smaller birds to land on before hitting the feeder. That's when I took my shots.

Now that I purchased the 400 f/5.6 I don't do this very often because I don't need them closer....I actually have to move back which is nice. :D

*If there was only a way to bait the Red Tailed Hawks to come to my yard without killing anything or upsetting my neighbors I'd do it in a heartbeat. ;):lol:


Why bait the hawks? Go to the local outdoor sporting good store. Buy yer self a good rabbit distress call. (WWW.cabelas.com (http://www.cabelas.com) item #2UG-227070) I have had owls and hawks come in to the call. Also to help out, you can get electronic things that flip things around to give the scene some action. and takes the attention away from you! (www.cabelas.com (http://www.cabelas.com) item XH-228308)

S.Horton
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 09:36
^^ Whoa! Very cool!

I know a set of RR tracks where there are a pair of owls and a hawk!

canonloader
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 09:40
As a kid, in the 50's, I was one of the gofers for a falconry club in my area. We used live mice in a home made 1/4 inch carpenters cloth cage to attract and catch red tails and other hawks. Our cages had monofiliment loops on top to catch their toes, and a 5 pound weight wired to the bottom so they couldn't fly away. This caught the hak for banding purposes. The cage would still work without the loops though, to attract a hawk. And he isn't about to give up before you get some pics. ;)

BooneDawg
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 10:31
No bait, but decoys!\
http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o87/BooneDawg1/CIMG2672.jpg

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o87/BooneDawg1/CIMG2676.jpg

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o87/BooneDawg1/1718514dzB.jpg

gymell
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 10:52
Attracting songbirds using feeders is not generally considered cheating. Of course, there are responsible ways to go about this - making sure the food is suitable, keeping the food fresh and feeders clean to avoid spreading disease, placing the feeders in an area that allows the birds a fair chance to avoid predators (especially house cats), avoiding attracting invasive species which have a detrimental affect on native populations, and so on. Examples of irresponsible feeding would be leaving dirty sugar water out for hummingbirds, putting out food like bread or salted peanuts which are bad for birds, observing conjunctivitis and leaving the feeders up, etc.

Feeding and baiting are not really the same thing. Feeding is basically putting food out and attracting birds as they come by on their own schedule. For the most part, there aren't ethical issues with that as long as it's done responsibly. It's encouraged by many groups such as the Audubon Society and other bird organizations.

Baiting is a term more often used with raptors because it usually involves attracting a single bird at a given moment. Raptors will get tunnel vision on a prey item and swoop in. This can be dangerous for raptors if it's over done as they might start to associate people with food, or if it's done in a location such as by the side of a road. A lot of people have ethical issues with it.

An example of the difference is this. When I first moved into my neighborhood I heard pileated woodpeckers drumming, so I wanted to attract them to my yard. If I happened to see one and go outside with a piece of suet on a string, there is no way it would swoop down on that piece of suet. Instead I had to set up a feeder with suet and the woodpecker would come by on its regular tour of its territory, whenever it felt like it.

If I were to bait a snowy owl for example, I'd find a snowy owl somewhere, take a live mouse and throw it out where the owl could see it, and wait for the owl to swoop down on it. So it's a planned moment to have a raptor take a live prey item at that moment. Different from the Cooper's hawk that hangs out in the yard, taking the occasional goldfinch from the thistle feeder.

S.Horton
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 14:36
No bait, but decoys!\
http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o87/BooneDawg1/CIMG2672.jpg

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o87/BooneDawg1/CIMG2676.jpg

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o87/BooneDawg1/1718514dzB.jpg

I assume these are decoy people, as the birds look real here.

So, did any people show up?

Did they swoop upon each other?

Oh, wait, that was the club.......

eccles
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 17:47
I regularly drop a few seeds and raw peanuts on a couple of fence posts as I walk round the local nature reserve. Other walkers do so as well so it's a stop-off point that the flocks check as they do their rounds. If they aren't there when I get there, a half hour wait will usually see them arrive. There are plenty of natural perches nearby where I can grab shots before they dive down for the treats.
What I don't do is drop huge amounts as this is a wild place and not a garden. If I miss a day, the birds have plenty of other areas to forage and won't go hungry.

owlboy
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 21:32
Buy yer self a good rabbit distress call. (WWW.cabelas.com (http://www.cabelas.com/) item #2UG-227070) I have had owls and hawks come in to the call.This method of luring birds of prey is fairly common. Some people are talented enough to use their own voice for chick or owl calls. Before tape recorders and mp3 players, this was the primary method used. But, you need to be aware of the danger of doing this. Over the years a number of people have had owls fly in and sink their talons into the callers face. I do know of one person who was permanently blinded in one eye. Owls learn at an early age to take food whenever possible. Sometimes this means taking food out of a siblings mouth. And, if the sibling allows it enough, they can die of starvation. It is survival of the fittest. When mature owls are full, but an opportunity presents itself, they will take additional prey. They will then hang onto it until they are hungry again. If another owl is hunger, they will steal the food from the other owl, or take the owl and the prey. So, if an owl thinks you have live prey in your mouth, and you are not going to eat it, they will steal it out of your mouth. When it comes to food, owls can be quite bold and aggressive.

This can be dangerous for raptors if it's over done as they might start to associate people with food I have heard this statement many times, but it is a myth. I believe this myth comes from people picking up and caring for branching owlets. This easily leads to imprinting of owlets. Imprinted owls then become associated with people and food, and cannot be released. They know a free meal when they see one. Biologist have used baiting for years to find nesting females. When biologist bait male Great Grays, they just consume the prey and go back to their perch. Great Grays will almost starve themselves to death to make sure that their offspring gets ever bit of food possible. Male Barred Owls will take the prey and lead you AWAY from the nest. They are much smarter then people think. They are very aware that you are trying to trick them, and if they can trick you, that is just fine with them.

For those who want to bait owls, there are a number of methods. (1) Buy mice at a pet store; (2) Capture mice or voles with a live mouse trap. Make sure that you capture them near the location of the owl; (3) Use a fishing pole and a fake mouse to lure the owl to come in. This method is common for bird banders. They then use a fishing net to capture the owl (license required); (4) Use a mouse or vole in a closed cage. The owl never gets the prey. This can be dangerous to the owl.; (5) Use a remote activated tape recorder of a chick or mouse. Everyone has their own opinion on the moral implications of baiting. And, those who do use baiting, everyone has an opinion of which method is best. If you do use baiting, do so responsibly to prevent impacting the birds of prey.

In the past some have stated that baiting is illegal in North America. This is not true. In 1998 the Migratory Bird Treaty Reform Act made it illegal to bait birds with the intent of physically capturing or actually physically capturing the bird. If you do capture a bird, you better have a license to do so. The fines are exceedingly large.

mikeb540
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 21:44
does using a rc plane that looks like a rival hawk count? it draws in the hawks., and other thermal seekers that are out soaring. lots of vultures.. but sometimes a redtail would fly by.. im typically trying to fly this glider so no time to photograph them.. perhaps a team effort would be a good way to do this. this is my alula (the bait) and yep there are battle marks on it... mostly from feeder birds chasen it away. as you can see it resembles a bird very well.
mike

canonloader
3rd of April 2008 (Thu), 21:52
Hey Mike, that's neat. Never seen a glider attacked before. It must be the pattern on it. :)

LBaldwin
4th of April 2008 (Fri), 00:29
Boy did I open a a big bag o' bird kibble with this one!! I was actually pondering the idea of mice as bait for Raptors but was and am hesitant to do so. I am woefully ignorant in this subject, both the care and feeding of and the photography of birds in general.

I DO NOT want to;

A. Hurt any birds
B. Cause any harm to the habitat
C. Force a conflict between birds where there wasn't one to start with.
D. Cause a bird to become food for another species (ie housecats).

I have no tarry with those that hunt birds, or any other critters (legally and humanely). It is afterall generally healthy for most populations. So I do not want anyone to view my actions as predatory.

If I were forced to hunt to subsist I would do it. But for now my actions and needs are photographic only.

So other than following birds from tree to tree, I am in the research mode to start with.

I thank all of you for your continued input in this matter. I am learning quickly, if you have or know of any online reources I would be very appreciative

snowyowl13
4th of April 2008 (Fri), 06:22
I take a lot of pictures of birds at or near my feeders. I have ten feeders up at present with a wide range of food. Just as someone else said i have branches and stumps set up among my feeders to act as perches for the birds.

canonloader
4th of April 2008 (Fri), 07:04
Do some forum searches on the Bird forum for Snowy Owls. Many of those were taken using pet store mice. Doesn't seem to have hurt the owls any.

GyRob
4th of April 2008 (Fri), 07:18
anything that helps bring the birds in has got to be worth it.
Rob.

gymell
4th of April 2008 (Fri), 09:54
Boy did I open a a big bag o' bird kibble with this one!! I was actually pondering the idea of mice as bait for Raptors but was and am hesitant to do so. I am woefully ignorant in this subject, both the care and feeding of and the photography of birds in general.

I DO NOT want to;

A. Hurt any birds
B. Cause any harm to the habitat
C. Force a conflict between birds where there wasn't one to start with.
D. Cause a bird to become food for another species (ie housecats).

I have no tarry with those that hunt birds, or any other critters (legally and humanely). It is afterall generally healthy for most populations. So I do not want anyone to view my actions as predatory.

If I were forced to hunt to subsist I would do it. But for now my actions and needs are photographic only.

So other than following birds from tree to tree, I am in the research mode to start with.

I thank all of you for your continued input in this matter. I am learning quickly, if you have or know of any online reources I would be very appreciative

Personally I wouldn't bait raptors on my own because I don't have any experience doing that. I think if you teamed up with someone like a falconer or a rehabber that knows how to do it properly, it could be done in a way that wouldn't harm the birds. There are people who have ethical issues with it regardless of circumstance, but I think there are ethical ways to do it by those who know what they are doing. I do think it would be irresponsible for someone with no experience (like myself) to go buy some pet store mice (which you don't know what they've been fed or exposed to that might harm the raptor that winds up eating them) and then just start baiting.

Nighthound
4th of April 2008 (Fri), 11:01
I don't bait aside from feeders near my backyard blind set up.

Introducing artificial feedings can have consequence. Attracting raptors to an area they would not normally hunt could seem harmless at the surface. If the area is flanked with high traffic roads those birds are at higher risk of becoming road kill. Google "Barn Owls and road deaths". Barn Owl's hunting habits near roads put them at an estimated 50% risk of death by motor vehicle. If they nest near a major road they are almost certain to be hit.

If baiting alters a raptor's natural hunting behavior it can put them in places that could put them in unecessary danger.

NH

S.Horton
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 06:57
The mice are, in the main, going to snake owners anyway.

I do wonder how to do it properly, so that the raptor gets a meal in exchange for shot.

baileydog
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 07:57
Hey MikeB-hubby wants to know where you got that plane? He's into RC planes too and thinks that one is too cool!

And now back to our topic.......................

ohiofalcon
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 08:38
Needed to use seeds to get this shot. The only thing that might be considered cheating is using a mouse to get Great Grey Owl or Snowy Owl action pics. But those shots are still awesome!!!
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c9/peri8x42/chickadee01.jpg

S.Horton
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 08:39
Great shot!

neil_r
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 08:44
HERE (http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=58849) is an interesting thread from 2005, it seems that the view has changed considerably since then.

http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=58849

LBaldwin
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 09:17
To all of you on both sides of the discussion:
I have waited my entire life to be able to afford the gear to persue birds with. I have shot all other kinds of subjects and mastered them pretty quickly (sorry if that sound arrogant it is not my intention). But to me it seems that using live bait for raptors is cheating. The stock and the hunt are part of the history of man, we no longer are required to hunt for food with weapons, but to me using bait to bring an animal to you serves only you and the animal is only helped with that one meal. Sure you may get some great images but at what cost.

Using food like suet for small birds is fractional but really just a lesser version of the same issue. If you are going to maintain the feeder all winter that is one issue but a one time thing or inconsistancy only serves the purpose of the photographer.

I think I have decided not to use food for now, and certainly not live bait for the raptors. I will call the local fish and game wardens to get the legal side of it as well.

Ethically I do not see it as correct, and photographically why take short cuts now?

canonloader
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 09:28
I think people aren't giving the birds enough credit. How long do you think it took owls to train humans to bring them free food? I mean, people are not known for smarts or compassion, patience, restraint, forethought or any of the things we should be good at. It's taken owls thousands of years to train humans to hunt them with cameras instead of guns and bows and arrows, so let's give them a little credit for knowing what they are doing, heh? ;)

MisterM
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 09:36
Do you mean for birds of prey making a kill?

:shock::twisted::lol:

Edit: Thought your were kidding. I recant my previous.

Blue Deuce
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 10:02
I think people aren't giving the birds enough credit. How long do you think it took owls to train humans to bring them free food? I mean, people are not known for smarts or compassion, patience, restraint, forethought or any of the things we should be good at. It's taken owls thousands of years to train humans to hunt them with cameras instead of guns and bows and arrows, so let's give them a little credit for knowing what they are doing, heh? ;)


I am with Mitch on this one. We give ourselves way too much credit for smarts when in fact it's usually the animals who have trained us.

canonloader
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 10:17
We give ourselves way too much credit for smarts when in fact it's usually the animals who have trained us.
Intelligence isn't everything. In fact, it has and is proving itself to be self cancelling. Name one species responsible for global warming, for eradication of hundreds if not thousands of other species, the destruction of it's own habitat. It shouldn't take long to come up with the answer, just look in the mirror. ;)

dispatchermike21
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 10:51
The last group of Eagle pic's I got was from baiting........ it was crab bait exposed at low tide there was a half dozen sometimes more Eagle fighting over the lighting sucked though.

Blue Deuce
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 12:28
just look in the mirror. ;)

Not a pretty sight.

Calbar
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 13:49
Might the use of pet store bought mice as bait introduce possible disease into the wild mouse population, decimating the natural food source and endangering the very wildlife we are enjoying observing and photographing?

owlboy
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 19:24
If the area is flanked with high traffic roads those birds are at higher risk of becoming road kill. Google "Barn Owls and road deaths". Barn Owl's hunting habits near roads put them at an estimated 50% risk of death by motor vehicle. If they nest near a major road they are almost certain to be hit.Some owls are prone to car impacts. Three in particular are very prone to car impacts. Those are Barn Owls, Barred Owls, and Short-Eared Owls. Several years ago 50 Barred Owls were released in a small town in North Carolina. All 50 died of car impacts. Highways in Idaho are littered with dead Barn Owls from car impacts. Short-Eared Owls were the most popular owl in the United States 100 years ago. Today they are rare. This is due to the introductions of cars, and the loss of farm land. On the other hand, Screech Owls, Great-Horned Owls, and Long-Eared Owls fair very well in cities. New York City has about a 1/2 dozen Screeches inside the 69th street entrance to Central Park. There is a Great Horned Owl nesting right now (5th year in a row) at the California University at Bakersfield (http://www.cs.csubak.edu/owlcam/camera.php web cam). Long-Eared Owls winter roost in Serbia cities in parliaments that can be as large as several hundred. The risk of car impacts really depends upon the type of owl. Right now Northern Saw-Whets are migrating back north. Some of our viewers will have up to a hundred Saw-Whets fly past their house tonight.

I will call the local fish and game wardens to get the legal side of it as well.It is not illegal to feed bird, owls, or hawks. It only become illegal if you intend to capture them. You can check this out by reading the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the 1998 the Migratory Bird Treaty Reform Act. You can find both of these on the US Fish & Game gov site. Canada also follows the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but their fines are much higher. The US Fish & Game usually doesn't act unless the violation is significant. This usually happens when someone intentionally kills them without remorse. The typical fine in the USA is around $5,000, and the fines can go up to $500k. If OhioFalcon was to capture and kill the Black-capped Chickadee, then the fines start at 100k under the new 1998 the Migratory Bird Treaty Reform Act. Only a few people in North American get arrest for this violation each year. This issue of bating is really a moral issue, not a legal one.

Might the use of pet store bought mice as bait introduce possible disease into the wild mouse population, decimating the natural food source and endangering the very wildlife we are enjoying observing and photographing?This very topic has been debated and researched by rehabbers for years. It has been determined that lab bred prey is significantly safer then wild prey. The ratio is quite significant. Some pet stores buy farm breed mice, which have a slightly higher disease rate then lab breed, but still much lower then wild prey. Wild prey carries a slew of diseases which often get passed on to hawks, owls, and crows. Diseases, such as West Nile Virus, show up in these birds first. Whenever an injured owl is picked up by a rehabber, they almost always find a number of health problems with them. They are the "barometers" of health for the animal kingdom. When a problem crops up, they are the first to get it. Then you have problems of wild mice and voles eating rat poison and passing them along to these birds.

tkoutdoor
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 22:35
Intelligence isn't everything. In fact, it has and is proving itself to be self cancelling. Name one species responsible for global warming, for eradication of hundreds if not thousands of other species, the destruction of it's own habitat. It shouldn't take long to come up with the answer, just look in the mirror. ;)I wasn't expecting to find political opinions here. That sounds like something a "round earther" would say. :p I'd have to counter that by saying, "Name one species that believed the earth was flat, the sun revolved around the earth, and that preached we were heading into the next "ice age" only 30 years ago." Seems like an awfully short period of time for "intelligent" man to suddenly have recovered from his arrogant stupidity. When we think we finally know it all, one things for sure... we're wrong. The scientists were just as sure in the 70's as those today and offered the same "we've learned a lot since then" excuses as well. This is just the latest round of "the sky is falling". I enjoy the "on topic" conversation here, but surely one must realize that "man-made" global warming is a charged topic.

dispatchermike21
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 01:27
I wasn't expecting to find political opinions here. That sounds like something a "round earther" would say. :p I'd have to counter that by saying, "Name one species that believed the earth was flat, the sun revolved around the earth, and that preached we were heading into the next "ice age" only 30 years ago." Seems like an awfully short period of time for "intelligent" man to suddenly have recovered from his arrogant stupidity. When we think we finally know it all, one things for sure... we're wrong. The scientists were just as sure in the 70's as those today and offered the same "we've learned a lot since then" excuses as well. This is just the latest round of "the sky is falling". I enjoy the "on topic" conversation here, but surely one must realize that "man-made" global warming is a charged topic.

Not so much a charged topic as it is a HEATED topic:p.........and it seems we bait each other as much as we bait birds.:)

canonloader
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 08:50
tkoutdoor, where did I say anything about ice ages or global warming? I distinctly said, "the destruction of it's own habitat". Don't you watch Nature or History or any news programs? In just my 60 some odd years, the poulation of humans has doubled and the population of every other species has halved, quartered or gone to zero because of it. I say no more.

tkoutdoor
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 08:59
tkoutdoor, where did I say anything about ice ages or global warming? I distinctly said, "the destruction of it's own habitat". Don't you watch Nature or History or any news programs? In just my 60 some odd years, the poulation of humans has doubled and the population of every other species has halved, quartered or gone to zero because of it. I say no more.

Intelligence isn't everything. In fact, it has and is proving itself to be self cancelling. Name one species responsible for global warming, for eradication of hundreds if not thousands of other species, the destruction of it's own habitat. It shouldn't take long to come up with the answer, just look in the mirror. ;)

You're not ignorant of the fact that you're stirring the pot here. I've mentioned it already. "Man-made" global warming is a charged topic, let's not pretend otherwise at the expense of those who don't agree with the premise.

canonloader
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 09:06
Aren't you the one who is stirring the pot? By ignoring everything else I said to take exception to one thing you don't agree with? Do you then agree with "for eradication of hundreds if not thousands of other species, the destruction of it's own habitat and intelligence is proving itself to be self cancelling"? And as for global warming, sure looks like it to me, prove me wrong. And, even if you attack me again, I say no more. :p

tkoutdoor
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 09:17
Aren't you the one who is stirring the pot? By ignoring everything else I said to take exception to one thing you don't agree with? Do you then agree with "for eradication of hundreds if not thousands of other species, the destruction of it's own habitat and intelligence is proving itself to be self cancelling"? And as for global warming, sure looks like it to me, prove me wrong. And, even if you attack me again, I say no more. :p
LOL, let it alone. This is not the place to debate "man made" global warming. I'm not going to debate it. My point is very clearly to identify that it's a charged topic. By promoting this view you're inviting (baiting has already been suggested) those who disagree to stand up to it or abandon this thread. It's a worthy thread, let's just keep it neutral on the "man made" global warming topic so the thread can have full participation. What do you say?

canonloader
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 09:45
What do you say?
I said it was a non issue from the start, until you made something of it. Now your trying to lay it on me. Pffffttttt.

S.Horton
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 09:52
I think this discussion is actually about stupid human behavior, not baiting per se.

LBaldwin
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 21:09
Actually I started the thread about baiting. Any other discussion should be done without hijacking the thread. I would love to hear any other information regarding that topic, it is very important for me to learn in this area.

tkoutdoor
7th of April 2008 (Mon), 00:46
Actually I started the thread about baiting. Any other discussion should be done without hijacking the thread. I would love to hear any other information regarding that topic, it is very important for me to learn in this area.
Yeah, me too. It's an interesting topic. Canonloader had some good information up there about how they used to attract birds to band them. I've been thinking about setting up feeding stations to attract local birds as well. Small birds... that is, to help them winter over and get some enjoyable pics out of it. Maybe hummingbirds too. All this weighs in to that either directly or indirectly. I hope this thread gets some more good input.

I am finding that part of the audience for photography are voyeurs in a sense. They find enjoyment in living vicariously through our pictures. People would like to be able to see animals close up or beautiful countryside, remote cabins, or macro'd items, but they don't have the wherewithall to do it themselves. So their imagination finds a life in our photos. What we can do through photography of these birds or other subjects helps others to live a little more fully in a manner of speaking.

LBaldwin
7th of April 2008 (Mon), 02:11
So far the only person brought to tears with my bird photography...... was me - cause I missed the freakin shot. The RTH that I was shooting, decided to drop from the tree and sail directly over my bean while I was changing CF cards. Less than 3ft over my head.

I still have yet to decide on feeding or baiting. I have some ethical issues with both. But I understand why it is done. If I decide to I would probably want to ensure that it is fully disclosed in some way to the viewer.

S.Horton
7th of April 2008 (Mon), 05:36
Small birds are just tough, because even when they're at my feeder and I'm at 560MM, they're small in the frame.