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toddb
21st of December 2004 (Tue), 20:22
My favorite model, my almost three year old. She's getting use to the camera now.

http://www.toddburke.net/gallery/web/CRW_5389.jpg

cmM
21st of December 2004 (Tue), 23:40
Beautiful model, beautiful picture!
Love the post processing!

tim
22nd of December 2004 (Wed), 01:50
Cute girl, the photo looks a little overexposed tho? Was a flash used at close range?

Ikinaa
22nd of December 2004 (Wed), 01:55
Cute girl, the photo looks a little overexposed tho? Was a flash used at close range?
I guess that it was wished to be overexposed.
that's why toddb titled it high-key portrait.

@toddb : I like it, I tried it also some time back, but my results were never satisfactory to me.
What lighting did you use? flash? window?

toddb
22nd of December 2004 (Wed), 04:37
@toddb : I like it, I tried it also some time back, but my results were never satisfactory to me.
What lighting did you use? flash? window?

I was standing in a narrow hallway. I had a 550EX flash that I pointed to the wall facing her (so flash was away from her) and I was standing at an angle (see how the background looks like it goes from light to lighter). I just wish it didn't have the dark shadow behind her but I can't get away from that very easily with what I am using though. The images isn't really overexposed, it's just a high-key touchup in Photoshop. I found that you can't really create a high key from an over exposed image very well because you have to keep the important detail. I'm not really good at them but I keep trying. You need a light solid background for it to work well I've found.

Here is the original:
http://www.toddburke.net/forumpost/CRW_5389_org.jpg

In photoshop I roughly did this:
1) Converted to to B&W using the lab color technique
a) convert to Lab Color
b) Select lightness channel
c) Convert mode to greyscale
d) Convert mode back to RGB
e) duplicate the layer and change that layer to multiply
f) Set opacity to about 50% and then adjust to where you want it

2) Then once you got you B&W image, I add an adjustment layer with the "Channel Mixer" and check the "monochrome" box and adjust to desired effect.

Ikinaa
22nd of December 2004 (Wed), 05:01
To remove the shadow from behind, I use the following method :
I bought at a second hand-photo-shop a used flash for about 10 Euro, a slave adapter with light cell (I don't know exactly what they are called : they are fixed on the contact of the flash and trigger the flash when the primary flash is fired). This flash, I point at the wall behind the subject, of course the subject has to be at a certain distance from the wall. With this method I have nearly no shadows on the wall, it works well with not too dark walls.

Agaric
24th of December 2004 (Fri), 21:27
In photoshop I roughly did this:
1) Converted to to B&W using the lab color technique
a) convert to Lab Color
b) Select lightness channel
c) Convert mode to greyscale
d) Convert mode back to RGB
e) duplicate the layer and change that layer to multiply
f) Set opacity to about 50% and then adjust to where you want it

2) Then once you got you B&W image, I add an adjustment layer with the "Channel Mixer" and check the "monochrome" box and adjust to desired effect. I would like to personally thank you for posting this simple yet very effective B&W conversion.
It has given me new hope with my attempts at digital B&W.


Thank you, Thank you, Thank you, Thank you!!!!:)

Let me add that we could really use a forum just for people to post their photoshop techniques.

BTW Very nice picture, she is a cutie!