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View Full Version : Would this be an acceptable lens/diopters for budget Macro?


alann
14th of June 2008 (Sat), 19:18
I am on a limited budget so cannot afford a "real" macro lens. I currently have and XTI with 18-55 ef-s IS, and 55-250 ef-s IS lenses and a set of Hoya diopters (+1,+2 and +4). Have been using the 18-55 and all diopters combined for close up. Just got a 100.00 gift card to B&H and was thinking of getting the EF 50mm f/1.8 II Autofocus Lens and using the diopters on it for close up. Was hoping to get input from those more knowledgeble before I possibly buy the wrong thing. Thanks for any input.

Alan

striving
14th of June 2008 (Sat), 19:41
I am in the same boat as you. Not enough $ to get a true macro.
In fact I am using the Canon 50mm 2.5 compact macro (1:2) with the Hoya Close-ups. I just got them about 2 weeks ago. I read somewhere that your should really only use 2 at a time, with the highest strength closest to the lens.

I started using the +4 and +2 together. I eventually took off the +2 as it wasn't getting that much closer, and I felt I was loosing a touch of sharpness/quality.

Here is one thread with some photo's using this set-up:
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=518694

If you look up my profile, you can see some of my other posts of pics where I used this set up too. I have to say over all, I am very happy with the 25$ I spent on the filters. They got me that much closer to make taking pics of things I have before new again with new details (Like common flies).

Just know though, your shooting range is VERY close to the subjects. Like a 2-3" inches. None-the-less, I am digging it.

-Bruce
Here is one shot...

http://i263.photobucket.com/albums/ii148/striving67/Photog/Macro/jumping_black2.jpg

alann
14th of June 2008 (Sat), 20:27
Thanks for the info. I can not afford the 50mm Macro so guess I will try the 50 1.8 and see what happens.

dpastern
14th of June 2008 (Sat), 22:40
I'd be more inclined to go with a set of tubes - they can be used on the 18-55, and also in cojunction with the current filters.

Dave

LordV
15th of June 2008 (Sun), 00:48
I agree with Dave- I'd save up a bit more and go with a set of extension tubes and the 50mm F 1.8, the pro-optic ext tube set from Adorama is pretty good with a nice price.
A very cheap alternative would be to get a 58mm reverse body adapter and reverse the kit lens on to the camera body.This will enable you to shoot at up to 3:1 with the disadvantage of losing aperture control. You have to preset the aperture with the lens mounted normally and then reverse it which results in a slightly dim viewfinder.

Brian V.

alann
15th of June 2008 (Sun), 12:43
Thanks for the info. Decided to go with the 58mm 1.8 and the Tubes as LordV suggested. Ordered the lens from B&H. Will get tubes beginning of July. Does anyone konw if the Adorama tubes will work with the EF-S lenses also?

Alan

lonelyjew
15th of June 2008 (Sun), 13:35
You could also look into a reversal ring for the 50mm 1.8.

Wilt
15th of June 2008 (Sun), 13:59
A reversal ring on an electronically controlled lens is pointless, as it fails to provide any aperture control of the lens!

A diopter lens is really meant to be used on a camera with a permanently mounted lens, and is only as good as the piece of glass (which isn't really great!)

Best macro with today's electronic lens camera dSLR is the electronically coupled extension tube, as you retain aperture control and you do not add a performance-limiting optic to the path.

lonelyjew
15th of June 2008 (Sun), 15:29
A reversal ring on an electronically controlled lens is pointless, as it fails to provide any aperture control of the lens!


You can't get aperture control while it's not mounted but you can control the aperture. You make the aperture whatever you'd like it to be while the lens is normally mounted, hit the dof preview button, and pull the lens off while holding it down. The viewfinder is dimmer because the aperture is locked(only temporarily of course) but what do you expect with a homemade macro.

Wilt
15th of June 2008 (Sun), 16:26
You can't get aperture control while it's not mounted but you can control the aperture. You make the aperture whatever you'd like it to be while the lens is normally mounted, hit the dof preview button, and pull the lens off while holding it down. The viewfinder is dimmer because the aperture is locked(only temporarily of course) but what do you expect with a homemade macro.

No dispute from me that this can permit aperture control. But in real life shooting, unless you are doing inanimate objects this is quite unworkable.