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HuskiesD1
2nd of August 2008 (Sat), 15:04
Note before reading this that I already have a year's experience in shooting sports and connections that athletic directors and parents are likely to know - I just have to decide how to use them...

I would like to sell prints to parents this fall, on my own. I'm aware of the two most commonly used choices, at least around here in Minnesota:

The first one is to have some sort of deal with a particular school or two by contacting the Athletic Director, then shooting ALL sports at ALL levels. Get to know the home team, then market to their opposition too.

The other method, which is used by a couple photographers I know, is to show up at events at a variety of schools and try to sell from there. I think this requires more marketing than the above suggestion, but I am OK with that.

Has anyone used either of the above methods? How well do they work and how have you modified them?

And yes, I do have a portfolio to show to an AD if I need ;)

Dennis_Hammer
2nd of August 2008 (Sat), 15:43
School sports are tough. I am contracted with a few schools in my area I supply them 'senior presents' that they give to out going athletes, these can either be posters or whole books depends on their budgets. I use a web site and just direct everyone to that. I occassionally drop a few pictures off to a high school and tell them they may display them with my copyright intact, which I use my website address. And I hand out cards during the events I photograph. Hope this helps.

Mike R
2nd of August 2008 (Sat), 23:43
In my area you don't have to deal with the AD but it helps to be friendly to him. At one school, my agreement is with the Booster Club and I offered them a percentage of the sales by choice. Another school I shoot at is different, each team has a parent club and each team that wants me to cover them, contacts me. I do not offer any kind of kickback and sales are much better there. I also sell the teams slide shows for their annual banquets. They're very profitable.

HuskiesD1
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 01:14
Mike, that is the way I want to go.

I plan on scheduling games and emailing team boosters a week or two in advance.

But like you said, I could gauge interest first.

CatchingUp
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 05:16
Remember the line from that baseball movie- "Build it, and they will come" ?

Here's what I've done- I show up and shoot most of the games 'for the fun of it'. I get lots of great shots, and then post them on my web site. The kids know all about it and LOVE going there after each game to see the shots.

Since I only do this for a 'hobby', it's not about selling for me. I crop my shots in such a way that I encourage the kids/families to just download the image and it will make a decent 4x6 print. A lot of the kids like to use the image to post on their myspace/facebook accounts.

But, you'd be surprised how many will contact you about ordering prints which eventually leads to other paying gigs. :-)

Case and point- our AD finally approached me about doing all the team sports pictures for the entire school which they use for yearbooks and such. But in the process, I offer the assorted packages to the players which can be profitable.

Reminds me of an 'old saying'...'give, and it shall be given back to you'.

Cheers

MMD
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 10:06
As Dennis said, HS can be tough. It will also depend on your area. More populated areas may already have a HS photographer that will turn into a big "wah" session if you are within 200' of the sideline. If this is the case,
chances are parents may not be happy with either his/her shots or prices or both. Tread lighlty at first, find out what you can and cannot do and exhaust you avenues. If they have no one, go all guns.

I have seen guys on site, print within ten minutes of the shot. It's expensive to set up, but can be profitable. They will carry 5 or 6 2MB cards, set up as close as possible to the refreshments stand under a tent, have a background guy/girl upload the card and PS (if required), 20-30 of the best of that card. Then run them through a viewer onto a 30" LCD TV. Parents crusie by and before you know it, they are handing over fistfuls of cash for an 8x10 of their kid, printed off a high quality printer located in the back of the SUV.

You can also pre-arrange with a online printing outlet (I'm not sure if i can name any other businessess' on this site). You basically set up a web front with them and hand out home made business cards and direct everyone there. Especially tell the kids, they will go there and pester the crap out of their parents who will tend to put the card in their wallet, send it though the washing machine and so on..

Both ways will make you money and will lead to other work if you are good enough to make sales. There are other ways of course. Dont be too concerned about marketing just yet. Priority should be getting access, then just being there will generate parent questions (who are you, my kid is #20, do you do family portraits, etc)

Work out how you can get the prints to them, whether it be from you or someone else. We can all stand on the sidelines and shoot 200 pictures for a HS game, parents want the results and if you can get them the prints yesterday, you will move forward quickly.

Best of Luck

HuskiesD1
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 11:06
Both ways will make you money and will lead to other work if you are good enough to make sales. There are other ways of course. Dont be too concerned about marketing just yet. Priority should be getting access, then just being there will generate parent questions (who are you, my kid is #20, do you do family portraits, etc)

I have all the access I want. The outlet I work for provides a press pass that can get me into any game but the state tournaments.

As for experience and being good enough, I've covered high school sports for a year, interned at two papers, covered four state tournaments, shot a season of D1 hockey. I hope so!

You can also pre-arrange with a online printing outlet (I'm not sure if i can name any other businessess' on this site). You basically set up a web front with them and hand out home made business cards and direct everyone there. Especially tell the kids, they will go there and pester the crap out of their parents who will tend to put the card in their wallet, send it though the washing machine and so on..My plan exactly.

I would LOVE to print on site, but it's not really feasible.

Also, welcome to the boards, MMD!

Dennis_Hammer
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 11:12
MMD I do that for Softball tournaments, with out the printing I show them and even sell them there just don't have someone I am comfortable with adjusting pictures for prints yet, even though I did recently pick up a fuji pictography 3500. So we'll see maybe soon.

PhotoSportsOnline
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 11:31
MMD
I do the same exact thing. I started back up in photo when my daughter started Cheer and we wanted shots of competition. Up until then we used little point and shots. I got to looking at my old pentex P3 and dusted it all off and said, no way, I am going digital.

I cannot upload photo's fast enough after a game, the kids are slamming my site faster then I can get them up. They post them on Myspace, use them in the school newspaper and the schools can use them for any promotional venue the wish.

I have traditionally shot for free to the schools, as strapped as some areas are for money, these kids have no chance or venue to get photos of themselves. The kids love it, the parents buy the ones they want and the schools I shoot at appreciate the work.

amfoto1
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 15:03
Unfortunately, the sports photography business really isn't what it used to be...

It's been heavily undermined by the hobbyists who shoot for the fun of it and practically or actually give away their work or treat it like a charity... by the folks who pay kickbacks to get the right to shoot... by those who just show up and shoot wherever and whenever stepping on toes and sometimes making a real mess of things in the process... And by the journalists who take advantage of their press passes to do it as a side job without bothering to check if there's already a commercial photog contracted to do the work.

And, it doesn't help that practically every mom and dad often have an affordable digital camera that virtually thinks for them to help them get some pretty darned good shots.

Any more, I simply won't get my camera out until I have a signed agreement with the organizer that names me as the exclusive commercial photographer and gives me unusual access so I can get the shots that mom and dad can't. If anyone else tries to just show up and shoot commercially, it's up to the organizer to put a stop to it. We can't do anything about mom and dad taking their own pics... Or the occasional press photographer, but they usually just shoot and scoot, aren't there from well before the event starts until long after it's over like I am.

In exchange, the organizer gets high quality photo services for their patrons, shot with pro equipment that can get the shot the typical consumer kit camera can't, with extra assurances that come from experience that the photography will be done in a safe manner by someone who puts a priority on protecting participants from harm, plus limited usage of many of my images for their own promotion and marketing at no charge.

In school sports, the biggest money to be made from prints is probably in the team and individual portraits. You'll usually need a location set up of some sort to do those, as well as the organizers agreement to exclusivity and cooperation organizing the shoot. Action shots at the weekly games won't sell much until after the end of the season. Playoffs and championships are your best live action selling opportunities. On site printing can double your print sales by catching the impulse buyers who will never make it to your online portal. But, print sales are only the tip of the iceberg. If you can also sell some images editorial and/or commercially (model releases required), or get some portrait sessions like someone else mentioned, you'll have a much better chance of making a decent living at it.

Add to all the above that in today's economic climate, print sales are considerably less than they were even last year. Worries about the high prices of everything, home foreclosures (although 97 percent of mortgages in the US are current and in good standing), and other financial concerns have people being cautious and dramatically cutting back on luxury and impulse buys.

The reality is that the business has changed a lot over the past five or ten years. There's a big mis-perception that shooting digital is "free", failing to consider that equipment will wear out rapidly and need replacement. People also sometimes discount the skill and experience of the photographer, as if the latest and greatest kit camera and a high frame rate are all that's necessary to make up for years of acquired talents and abilities.

If all the above sounds a bit harsh and perhaps in some respects discouraging, well I'm sorry. It can still be a good business, but don't expect to get rich at it. You really need to go into it with your eyes wide open. You need to think of ways to get the shots that others can't, protect your franchise, as well as look for ways to market your shots beyond simple print sales and spin off business that can help keep your business in the black.

HuskiesD1
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 15:33
Alan, thanks for your post. Puts some things into perspective, but here are a few of my observations.

I covered all sports for three different schools last year (assignments changed) and never met someone who was selling prints.

As for press photographers, I live in the right area. In Minnesota, the Star Tribune and Pioneer Press only cover the big name teams. We only have one local weekly paper in the metro area with no dailies - and I freelance for the weekly - they don't do reprints.

I believe I initially stated that I am shooting for a well-known Minnesota yearly publication. Parents/students who that when I show up, those photos will appear in a book and online.

I'm also not looking to make a small fortune off of this. My print prices are competitive, but I am also a student with another job. If I can two-three games a week and make more than 600 dollars a month, I'll be happy. Not looking for full time here!

Thanks for your replies!

CatchingUp
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 18:41
Unfortunately, the sports photography business really isn't what it used to be...

It's been heavily undermined by the hobbyists who shoot for the fun of it and practically or actually give away their work or treat it like a charity... by the folks who pay kickbacks to get the right to shoot... by those who just show up and shoot wherever and whenever stepping on toes and sometimes making a real mess of things in the process... And by the journalists who take advantage of their press passes to do it as a side job without bothering to check if there's already a commercial photog contracted to do the work.

And, it doesn't help that practically every mom and dad often have an affordable digital camera that virtually thinks for them to help them get some pretty darned good shots.

Any more, I simply won't get my camera out until I have a signed agreement with the organizer that names me as the exclusive commercial photographer and gives me unusual access so I can get the shots that mom and dad can't. If anyone else tries to just show up and shoot commercially, it's up to the organizer to put a stop to it. We can't do anything about mom and dad taking their own pics... Or the occasional press photographer, but they usually just shoot and scoot, aren't there from well before the event starts until long after it's over like I am.

In exchange, the organizer gets high quality photo services for their patrons, shot with pro equipment that can get the shot the typical consumer kit camera can't, with extra assurances that come from experience that the photography will be done in a safe manner by someone who puts a priority on protecting participants from harm, plus limited usage of many of my images for their own promotion and marketing at no charge.

In school sports, the biggest money to be made from prints is probably in the team and individual portraits. You'll usually need a location set up of some sort to do those, as well as the organizers agreement to exclusivity and cooperation organizing the shoot. Action shots at the weekly games won't sell much until after the end of the season. Playoffs and championships are your best live action selling opportunities. On site printing can double your print sales by catching the impulse buyers who will never make it to your online portal. But, print sales are only the tip of the iceberg. If you can also sell some images editorial and/or commercially (model releases required), or get some portrait sessions like someone else mentioned, you'll have a much better chance of making a decent living at it.

Add to all the above that in today's economic climate, print sales are considerably less than they were even last year. Worries about the high prices of everything, home foreclosures (although 97 percent of mortgages in the US are current and in good standing), and other financial concerns have people being cautious and dramatically cutting back on luxury and impulse buys.

The reality is that the business has changed a lot over the past five or ten years. There's a big mis-perception that shooting digital is "free", failing to consider that equipment will wear out rapidly and need replacement. People also sometimes discount the skill and experience of the photographer, as if the latest and greatest kit camera and a high frame rate are all that's necessary to make up for years of acquired talents and abilities.

If all the above sounds a bit harsh and perhaps in some respects discouraging, well I'm sorry. It can still be a good business, but don't expect to get rich at it. You really need to go into it with your eyes wide open. You need to think of ways to get the shots that others can't, protect your franchise, as well as look for ways to market your shots beyond simple print sales and spin off business that can help keep your business in the black.

Ok...I won't say you were 'aiming' for me, but I did sense a tad of irritation with the likes of 'my kind'.

So is what I'm doing a good thing, a bad thing, or 'just the way it is these days' ...in your opinion?

Maybe it's a whole other package in a big city. I happen to live in a rural community and NO ONE was doing anything like what I do so I'm certainly not upsetting anyone's apple cart around here. I'm the only one who shoots the games and being a teacher at the school, I know they are very appreciative of the stuff I send their way for the yearbook.

But I do get a bit puzzled at times when I read such posts as this. At least when it comes to events like a local high school sports team/game.

On the other hand, last spring, I was contacted about shooting some local Jr. rodeo events. There was no gurantee of selling prints other than posting proof shots on line and letting people order. It proved to be very long days and after two events, I realized it was not profitable for me and have not been back. ( I will be shooting their finals in October and I hear people are more apt to order shots then) As a parent, I can see where there are limits on what you will spend with hobbies like that with the traveling and meals and entry fees, etc for these rodeo events.

And I was made aware that there was a lady there shooting pictures herself and was sort of doing what I do with these football games. So I can understand in a situation like that, it would be nice to know up front that the organizers who contacted me would assure me that I have exlusive rights to shooting the event and selling the stuff, but I was only because I was asked to shoot with the expectations of making money. But I had mixed feelings on what this lady was doing. Seems to me the market place will determine what is profitable.

I have a hard time 'banning' hobbyist from bringing a camera to a public event and being told they can't take pictures of their kids or friends kids, etc. Something is just not right about that.

I don't know how many pictures this other lady was getting that were good (lighting conditions were HORRIBLE in the indoor arena) but after two events, I decided it was not worth my time and just chose not to go back. No big deal.

MMD
3rd of August 2008 (Sun), 22:49
HuskiesD1,
I can see both Alan and Tony's POV. I lived a city of 8 million for 30 years, to now where i live in a city of 35,000. Based on your reply and i'm guessing you live in a moderate size city, you will have competition even if your the only photographer on the sidelines. It is not uncommon to see Mom's and Dad's with Rebel XTi's with a 70-200mm on the front end, sitting 7-8 rows back. Lighting at city outdoor venues is usually decent, so you may have to pull something out of your bag of tricks to be able to sell. I can see Alan's point, it can be tough and becuase my experience dates back only about 5 years, times may very well have changed. You sound like you have close school contacts, exploit without being obnoxious and see where you end up. Set up with an online web front and go for it, if the print on site option is unfeasable.

As mentioned, i now live in a city of 35,000 where rush hour is more like rush 15 minutes and there is no stress when you are four cars from pole position at a set of traffic lights. Rural is a blast. I have been here about 8 months. Knew absolutely nobody and had no clue when, what, or even where town events were held. Little bit of town folk talk and i arrived at a MX Event. I shot about 1500 images and was right in track center with a simple signed injury disclaimer. No background check, red tape, competing photog's. Just having good old fun under a candle lit, indoor arena. The crowd of 300 strong loved knowing i was there and i made a few $$$ along the way.
So now i have parents asking the question i had put in my original post. Next stop was a Little Leage Event, 95 degree heat over 4 days. Another 1500 images and the same result as earlier mentioned. Since then I have been asked to come photograph an IMCA Race Team (Modified circuit racing), of course i covered the entire event and again made some $$$. I have since been invited back to cover the remaining 6 events for the year. I even have access to the crows nest (flag guy)!

Now i have 2 BB Team contracts for portraits and team shots, invites to football events from 2 school principles, "preferred photographer" at future MX events, IMCA Pit and Inner track access, done some school seniors from all the mom's and dad's at the above events and wrestling coming up when school starts. Not to mention weddings, families, dogs, cats, whatever else any one will pay me to shoot. So i can see Tony's point about having ??? all over Alan's post.

This reply is not to toot my horn, actually, some of the images sold have been mediocre IMO, BUT, they were happy someone finally turned up with a big professional looking camera, and kids love looking at that 8x10 of themselves on their bedroom wall.

So to finalize, you can see the diferences in replies based on location. Have fun, work out what will be best for you and get at it. One personal thought...if your images have that WOW factor for anyone, they are good enough to be paid for. Dont hand over your images for free!

Mike R
4th of August 2008 (Mon), 06:09
Everyone needs to be aware that as quickly you get a job, you can lose it. Last year was my first year shooting action shots at one school. Another person had been doing the Football T&I for years and I was told that their giving the T&I to me. It's because my shots and ideas are refreshing rather than the same thing year after year. So you need to keep things looking new. I'm now offering posters and digital memory mates but will offer different styles each year so that when a kid leaves school he will have 4 different looking memory mates or posters instead of shots that don't change from year to year, in a cardboard folder.
So keep coming up with new things so your customers stay excited about you.

MJPhotos24
5th of August 2008 (Tue), 05:19
Everyone needs to be aware that as quickly you get a job, you can lose it. Last year was my first year shooting action shots at one school. Another person had been doing the Football T&I for years and I was told that their giving the T&I to me. It's because my shots and ideas are refreshing rather than the same thing year after year. So you need to keep things looking new. I'm now offering posters and digital memory mates but will offer different styles each year so that when a kid leaves school he will have 4 different looking memory mates or posters instead of shots that don't change from year to year, in a cardboard folder.
So keep coming up with new things so your customers stay excited about you.

Very true, I got into the youth market by mistake in all honesty and stayed in it because it is decent pay even though I was shooting pro sports before youth. You just never know when you're going to lose a client or gain one, and you never know the reason as to why. I make 90% of my living through photography (with the other 10% coaching) and mixing it up and giving choices is big, the local youth league here we get the kids age 5-12 so they want to mix it up usually - at least pose wise. Changing the memory mates, posters, cards, etc. is good for every season - from soccer to baseball to football to hockey, etc., offering different poses and not being "stuck in your ways" is huge.

As for the other stuff mentioned....it's an interesting profession in that anyone can claim to do it and that there is no set structure of how you have to do it. I've been undercut recently by a free photographer (who oddly enough I talked to VERY often and this person argued against free photographers saying they undercut them to - huh strange, very strange). Funny thing after so many complaints about photos this year the guy in charge emailed me saying we should talk about next year - strange how that works out.

Anyways, you do look at photography completely different when you're making a living off it vs. doing it as a hobby or side profession and you have a full time job to pay the bills. I personally couldn't justify giving anything away for free anymore, period! Once you set that structure it's hard to get out of it and yes I did start off by doing some freebies as a college kid just wanting to rehab and play baseball again, not shoot it - accidents happen. It was oddly the team GM who said "we need to start paying you for this stuff" and not me going asking for it. But through the years it just seems you get more gigs, and better ones, by being more of a business than hobby. They're willing to pay more for a pro to do it than not, usually. Though as everyone knows that has done it we're not always the most respected of professions - after all it's just clicking a free image with that digital camera. :rolleyes:

...and back to the OP. Just showing up I don't think is a good idea. #1 how do you know if there isn't someone under contract that has exclusives? There's been a few posts on here about that, not every person working the game knows that other guy isn't supposed to bethere and it causes trouble. #2 we live in an overprotective society nowadays and if they don't know you they won't trust you. Sure it might only be one parent out of 1,000 but you just never know how much trouble they can cost. As a high school coach for 3 sports I see some guy walk in with a camera and doesn't look like a parent or our school photographer I'm going to find out who the heck they are and what they are doing there - selling randomly to parents probably wouldn't fly in my gym and I'd have them removed (we have contract photogs at 2/3 of the schools and the third one if I want someone there doing that I'll invit someone there to do it).

Hopefully some of that rambling made sense, 6:19am up all night meeting deadline - now, whats for breakfast.

TheFloridaShooter
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 14:27
Can public schools not allow someone to photograph an event?

Mike R
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 14:38
Can public schools not allow someone to photograph an event?

I don't think it would ever happen if you were in the stands but they can and will restrict access to the sidelines, etc..

MJPhotos24
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 15:17
Can public schools not allow someone to photograph an event?
Public schools are not public property. They can restrict cameras at any time on the sidelines or in the stands, it does not matter. They can allow pros and not allow fans and vice-versa. There's a few schools in the city I know of that don't even allow fans! When the game is going it's only coaches, players and refs - that's it. So in short, yes they can not allow someone to photograph an event.

MJPhotos24
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 15:18
I don't think it would ever happen if you were in the stands but they can and will restrict access to the sidelines, etc..

It has happened, but of course usually someone they don't know and is there for some reason besides shooting images of there own kid.

SPORTshot
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 18:11
This is a great thread everyone.....great insight. Let's keep this one going.

Simon Turkin
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 20:22
I have a few ??s

What is a good website to put photos up for sale??

Next is it okay to outsource your prints to a cvs or costco to save money?? Sorry to steal the tread if its taken that way

Mike R
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 20:42
I have a few ??s

What is a good website to put photos up for sale??

Next is it okay to outsource your prints to a cvs or costco to save money?? Sorry to steal the tread if its taken that way

Many of us use Exposure Manager or Zenfolio to name a couple.
I prefer Exposure Manager. Here's a discount link http://www.exposuremanager.com/aff/mikerubinphoto

These sites handle the printing and direct shipping to your customers.
Exposure MAnager has their own in-house lab for prints and only use a third party lab for some novelty items.

Most of the sites have a free trial period

Huskers69
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 22:11
When the game is going it's only coaches, players and refs - that's it.

sounds like one too many brawls happenned there. That's pretty extreme. :(

MJPhotos24
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 22:12
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=371115&highlight=exposure+manager+vs+smugmug

http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=344495&highlight=exposure+manager+vs+smugmug

http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showpost.php?p=3214639&postcount=7

Free trial on EM...
http://www.exposuremanager.com/aff/mikejanesphotography

Great site and if you want to print on your own you can do self-fulfillment and make any products you want - not stuck to a list of selected products.

TheFloridaShooter
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 23:02
Here is what happened. Went to a practice this afternoon. By chance the AD was at the Varsity practice. I had emailed him and he said no problem by email. In person he told me the school had a contract with a Photographer in another city. Roughly 45 miles away that did the team photo and would possibly photograph a couple games during the season. Anyway he asked me if I would be selling the photos. I was completely honest with him and said - yes. I don't think he liked it. But I think he like that I was honest. After more conversation concerning this, I agreed to not hand out my business card while at games. But I'm allowed to tell people my web address or have it on a slip of paper.

I live in this school district and pay a lot of property taxes to the schools. I really feel they are not doing justice to our kids. What kind of quality service can a photographer provide that cover a total of 5 counties and might shoot a couple of games? These kids are young once. I looked at the photographers website and I could buy a second home with what he charges.

Thank for listening to my rant. I'm over it now.

SPORTshot
5th of March 2009 (Thu), 23:26
Here is what happened. Went to a practice this afternoon. By chance the AD was at the Varsity practice. I had emailed him and he said no problem by email. In person he told me the school had a contract with a Photographer in another city. Roughly 45 miles away that did the team photo and would possibly photograph a couple games during the season. Anyway he asked me if I would be selling the photos. I was completely honest with him and said - yes. I don't think he liked it. But I think he like that I was honest. After more conversation concerning this, I agreed to not hand out my business card while at games. But I'm allowed to tell people my web address or have it on a slip of paper.

I live in this school district and pay a lot of property taxes to the schools. I really feel they are not doing justice to our kids. What kind of quality service can a photographer provide that cover a total of 5 counties and might shoot a couple of games? These kids are young once. I looked at the photographers website and I could buy a second home with what he charges.

Thank for listening to my rant. I'm over it now.


I understand your frustration but if they have a contract with someone else, the AD's hands are kind of tied.....just be glad that he's giving you access. Work hard to deliver a quality product to the parents and put a portfolio together to show the AD at the end of the season.......if your stuff is better, maybe they will give you the contract next time around.

Simon Turkin
6th of March 2009 (Fri), 20:32
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=371115&highlight=exposure+manager+vs+smugmug

http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=344495&highlight=exposure+manager+vs+smugmug

http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showpost.php?p=3214639&postcount=7

Free trial on EM...
http://www.exposuremanager.com/aff/mikejanesphotography

Great site and if you want to print on your own you can do self-fulfillment and make any products you want - not stuck to a list of selected products.


Thanks a ton!!