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JBP
13th of August 2008 (Wed), 09:39
I have a 40D with a 24-70mm f/2.8. When I am close to my subjects (10' and less) my shots look very sharp. When I get further away I have a hard time maintaining sharpness, even at very fast shutter speeds. Any advice or knowledge would be appreciated. Thanks!

joedlh
13th of August 2008 (Wed), 09:45
It would be helpful if you posted a couple of examples.

JCH77Yanks
13th of August 2008 (Wed), 10:21
If you're shooting outdoors, atmospheric conditions play a role in the ability of a lens to resolve details at a distance - i.e. haze, moisture, etc...

Dermit
13th of August 2008 (Wed), 10:32
I know a lot of people will claim otherwise but the 24-70 has been known to have had 'bad copies' out there that tend to backfocus under certain conditions. I am not saying that this is your problem, just saying that it's something to look at. I have a copy that definitely backfocuses that I am sending in soon to have fixed.

NAisBEST
13th of August 2008 (Wed), 10:35
You know what...I've noticed this on occasion as well. Taking photos of a flower, per se, comes out nice and crisp. Then go to a landscape such as a field of a row of trees, at 100% crop it's lacking.

Mike
13th of August 2008 (Wed), 11:09
You know what...I've noticed this on occasion as well. Taking photos of a flower, per se, comes out nice and crisp. Then go to a landscape such as a field of a row of trees, at 100% crop it's lacking.

And herein lies your problem :rolleyes:

If you shoot a single flower, close up, you are using most of your megapixels on that one flower which means plenty of detail and sharpness.
Taking a shot of a landscape and cropping in to pick out trees is always going to look softer because you are using less pixels for each object. It's simple mathematics and unavoidable.

NAisBEST
13th of August 2008 (Wed), 11:43
And herein lies your problem :rolleyes:

If you shoot a single flower, close up, you are using most of your megapixels on that one flower which means plenty of detail and sharpness.
Taking a shot of a landscape and cropping in to pick out trees is always going to look softer because you are using less pixels for each object. It's simple mathematics and unavoidable.

Never thought of that. :lol: Good logic always outweighs suspicion.

JBP
13th of August 2008 (Wed), 13:14
Michael,
That makes sense. For some reason though, using a 10 megapixel camera, I always thought I could shoot a person (full body) and crop in on just their face and get the same quality as if I framed just the face in the first place. I guess I thought there were enough "extra" pixels.

What I hear you saying is, if I shoot a family portrait, I should make post adjustments (sharpening, etc.) at full frame and not expect them to be absolutely sharp when I zoom in?

poloman
13th of August 2008 (Wed), 15:47
Get right in there on your subject.

chauncey
14th of August 2008 (Thu), 09:29
This subject has been covered herein many times.
As was said before, the most "pixels on target" gives the best clarity, assuming all other things are equal.

TheHoff
14th of August 2008 (Thu), 09:32
If you're shooting outdoors, atmospheric conditions play a role in the ability of a lens to resolve details at a distance - i.e. haze, moisture, etc...

Glad someone mentioned this; it is often left out when talking about near/far sharpness. Atmospheric haze is certainly an issue as you're shooting through thousands of times more dust and particles in the air.

poloman
14th of August 2008 (Thu), 09:58
Glad someone mentioned this; it is often left out when talking about near/far sharpness. Atmospheric haze is certainly an issue as you're shooting through thousands of times more dust and particles in the air.

Inspires visions of a post apocalyptic, nightmare environment. Maybe it's time to move Hoff. :)