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picturepages
27th of September 2008 (Sat), 12:59
http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z121/goldeneve/gator1sms.jpg?t=1222534270

A friend of ours had these given to him from the local pet store. I guess the pet store could no longer care for them.
I think he is nuts for taking them into his home. He plans to make an outside inclosure but my goodness....TWO alligators?????

Does anyone have alligators as pets in here?

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z121/goldeneve/gator4.jpg?t=1222534618

They are small.......for now......but that pool wont hold em for long.

Eagle
27th of September 2008 (Sat), 13:31
What will he do in an outdoor enclosure during the Montana winters?

Eagle
27th of September 2008 (Sat), 13:35
Might tell him to check the laws on keeping them as pets. I believe a lot of areas have size/length limits on reptiles.

picturepages
27th of September 2008 (Sat), 14:10
I'm guessing that if the pet store was able to bring them in and sell them....they must be allowed. Why I have no idea why because of the winters here.
He says he plans to make an inside/outside inclosure...and will heat the inside in the winter.
I'm more concerned with his safety. But he seems to think he will be fine with them.

Eagle
27th of September 2008 (Sat), 14:19
Around here the way it used to be was you could have any reptile you wanted up to a certain length (I think 36"). Which meant sell/buy/own as a baby legally, but once it was over the length it becomes illegal. Didn't make any sense to me.

SlowBlink
27th of September 2008 (Sat), 15:05
He'll get rid of them soon after they reach maturity. You can handle them when they're young but get very aggressive when they reach adulthood. They'll also rip that room apart pretty quickly. There should be steel cage covers over every thing you wouldn't want it to eat, other than the rocks. The best enclosure would be concrete with heating layed before you pour. Also forget about pretty foliage and terrarium landscaping. That will get ripped up the first day.

The biggest danger with large lizards is you get bored with them and stop handling them. A few months go by and their natural instincts return and the next time you go to handle them they get aggressive.

Love the first shot though :) Get lots of shooting done while he has them.

picturepages
28th of September 2008 (Sun), 15:21
yes...I wondered how long before they started to eat things in the room...I cant imagine the cords being safe and what not.
I did a google on them when I got home and I really do not think he will be able to house them. He just does not have the money's it will take to do so.
He is knowen for having reptiles and handles them well...but this is a whole new ball game with alligators.
the bad thing is ..he is nuts enough to give it a try and he "feels" he can handle them.
I just hope he is smart enough to know that he cant safely keep them and keep others safe around them.

SlowBlink
28th of September 2008 (Sun), 16:50
What they don't eat they tear apart. I had a Nile monitor that clawed through the drywall because he could smell the cat food bowl in the other room. They're not impossible to keep but a lot of work. He can do it on a budget using a maintenance diet rather than a growth diet. Poultry suppliers are a good source of mangled birds that don't make it to retail.

The biggest thing for me was the habitat. Trying to make something that looked natural was next to impossible to maintain. If he has reptiles already he should be fine with handling. He knows they're unpredictable already.

Just tell him not to get drunk and try to hug it like a guy out here did. Now his shirts don't fit right.:confused:

stugotzo
29th of September 2008 (Mon), 11:30
Gators grow about 1/2 a foot per year. I think within a year or two, your freind won't want them. They're almost already to a point where they wouldn't be safe around children.

theague
29th of September 2008 (Mon), 13:06
First shot is awesome btw. ;)

marjnap
29th of September 2008 (Mon), 15:17
The first shot is great! Ughh...Alligators as pets, I don't think that a good idea if you like your appendages.

Zipline
29th of September 2008 (Mon), 21:42
The first shot is great. I really love it.

As for keeping alligators for pets, I personally think that should be banned. These are WILD animals and just not meant to be someone's pet. I'm not saying your friend would do this, but a lot of people get these cute little gator babies and then when they realize they can't care for them, they just release them into the wild. Such a disturbing trend... :(

Zipline
29th of September 2008 (Mon), 21:50
He can do it on a budget using a maintenance diet rather than a growth diet.
Assuming by this statement you mean to feed it just enough to sustain itself and keep it alive, I have a question. Why get a 'pet' if you don't intend to care for it properly? I just don't understand this logic. I personally take pet ownership VERY seriously, to seriously according to some of my friends/family (I home cook for my dogs). What they need, they get without any hesitation. This attitude of 'feeding it just enough to get by' (if that's what you're saying) is really frustrating and disappointing. :(

SlowBlink
29th of September 2008 (Mon), 22:30
Well you should ask before assuming you know, then you wouldn't get all stressed out about a perceived cruelty. A maintenance diet is what you give any animal to "maintain" optimum health. It's what every Zoo and Veterinarian recommend for your pets. A growth diet is completely different and actually more dangerous to the animals health. It requires the animals organs work at their maximum efficiency. Proteins, vitamins and calcium supplements are given at every feeding rather than once every third or fourth feeding.

I studied animal health with the purpose of going into reptiles as a specialty. None of my collection starved or suffered any ill health while in my care. I also worked for an organization called Wildlife Rescue. I went into properties that were being demolished and removed pigeons, then hand raised the young before releasing them.

Very clever use of "if that's what you're saying" though.:rolleyes:

Anyway, get as many shots of them as you can PicturePages. There colors and markings are beautiful while they're young.

salexande867
29th of September 2008 (Mon), 22:47
Alligators are protected and highly regulated. Anyone who keeps an alligator captive must have special licenses. Any pet shop selling them will probably be shut down if the authorities find out. It just happen to 2 of our local pet shops.

The Caimen is legal for the pet trade, but it is not an alligator.

That first shot is nice, though.

picturepages
29th of September 2008 (Mon), 23:11
I would guess that pets just like humans...can eat and eat and eat with out "needing" the extra food to stay alive...and with that would gain more weight.
of course you have to keep in mind the safety with something like this. It's not safe to let something like this,..in that kind of an inviroment,...eat to gain weight and get large. It can eat and be comfortable without eating to gain weight.
Of course it will gain weight as it grows naturally...it just wont gain it fast and become to big to fast.
After all... I can eat and be comfortable without needing to eat to gain weight...I think they can too.

picturepages
29th of September 2008 (Mon), 23:34
I'm actually upset with the pet shop for bringing them into town.
This is a small place...and yes..gets very damn cold in the winters...it's Montana after all.
No way these would ever EVER make it outside and once they'd hit the fresh water...the water is to cold for them even in the summer and I would think they would die just getting into the lake.
these HAVE to be housed in a heated enclosure...it takes someone with money to house them and the know how to manage and raise them. The pet store "gave" them to him because they couldnt house them anymore. No one in town is "into" these kind of things. I think she brought them in because she was a new store opening up and wanted some attention.
Now my friend has them and I feel it's an accident waiting to happen. Winter is comming so they are inside for at least another 7 months.
I could go on and on and on of the cons for him to have these....but its not my place to say...

and your right salexande they are Caimen...which from what I have read are more aggressive then alligators.
When I was taking pics I was right down next to them. Not being to worried. But when I got home and googled about them I read how not to do that cause they move fast and can take a hand even at that age...yikess!!! I will be more carful next time around.

Roy Webber
30th of September 2008 (Tue), 04:42
The 1st shot is cool...well done

Zipline
30th of September 2008 (Tue), 19:31
Well you should ask before assuming you know, then you wouldn't get all stressed out about a perceived cruelty.
I was asking, I guess I just didn't word it well enough. I apologize for that. It was late and I was exhausted so please don't take it to heart.

A maintenance diet is what you give any animal to "maintain" optimum health. It's what every Zoo and Veterinarian recommend for your pets. A growth diet is completely different and actually more dangerous to the animals health. It requires the animals organs work at their maximum efficiency. Proteins, vitamins and calcium supplements are given at every feeding rather than once every third or fourth feeding.
Thanks for the explanation. I used to work with a few animal rescue groups (mainly with dogs and ferrets) myself and I've seen a lot of animals come through who were in VERY rough shape, mainly the "larger" breed dogs and ferrets because to many people buy them thinking that it'll make them more appealing and cool (this is what I fear with animals like these gators). Half the time they have absolutely NO clue what they're getting themselves into and they end up abusing or neglecting/abandoning these animals (including animals who were very emaciated). After seeing some of the cases that I've seen I've become very passionate and protective of animals. That's why I kind of 'went off' last night. Again, I probably could've worded it better, but at the same time it's hard to tell someone's tone when it's all typing on a screen.

I studied animal health with the purpose of going into reptiles as a specialty. None of my collection starved or suffered any ill health while in my care. I also worked for an organization called Wildlife Rescue. I went into properties that were being demolished and removed pigeons, then hand raised the young before releasing them.
Judging by this statement, you've probably seen some pretty upsetting stuff as well so I'm sure that you probably have a better understanding of where I'm coming from as well.

Very clever use of "if that's what you're saying" though.:rolleyes:
Like I said, I wasn't try to be a wiseass or anything, I was looking for an explanation on what you meant by 'maintainance', I guess I just used a poor choice of words and I do apologize for that. :)

Stormin_24
30th of September 2008 (Tue), 20:17
Plead with him to get rid of them before before someone gets hurt bad or worse... I wouldn't have any child within 500 ft of them, EVER!!! Gotta be a law against having these as pets... GATORS are not pets... period...

Steve Irwin knew what he was doing too, and look what happened...

stugotzo
1st of October 2008 (Wed), 13:35
Plead with him to get rid of them before before someone gets hurt bad or worse... I wouldn't have any child within 500 ft of them, EVER!!! Gotta be a law against having these as pets... GATORS are not pets... period...

Steve Irwin knew what he was doing too, and look what happened...Steve Iwrin didn't die because of an alligator.

HTH, HAND.;)

Tee Why
1st of October 2008 (Wed), 13:45
I too think the first shot is nice. I also agree with others that this probably won't come to a good end.

Recently, some guy released a "pet" alligator in a local lake around Los Angeles, b/c it got too big. Fortunately, they caught "Reggie" and he is now at the Los Angeles zoo.

Mike McCusker
1st of October 2008 (Wed), 13:54
Pet alligators is an oxymoron!!!

hughps
1st of October 2008 (Wed), 15:52
I wouldn't have any child within 500 ft of them, EVER!!!

I agree with the sentiment, but if this is truly the case then you should never go within 500 feet of a fresh body of water in Florida :)

Stormin_24
2nd of October 2008 (Thu), 03:01
Steve Iwrin didn't die because of an alligator.

HTH, HAND.;)

I know he didn't!! I was simply making a point... The OP states he felt he could handle them... Steve thought the same thing with Manta Ray's...

stugotzo
2nd of October 2008 (Thu), 14:14
I know he didn't!! I was simply making a point... The OP states he felt he could handle them... Steve thought the same thing with Manta Ray's...
You could see someone's confusion over your statement. You're first talking about gators (close enough to crocs for our sake), then you reference Steve Irwin's untimely death.

JoseyGator
15th of December 2010 (Wed), 13:27
This is an old post, but I wanted to comment that I have a pet alligator and that he is awesome.

When I first got him he was crazy. The people that bought him put him in a pond and basically forgot about him. He would lung at me, try to bite, growl. Keep in mind the little tyke was only 18-24 inches at the time so he was hardly scary. When I would feed him he would whip the food out of my hand so fast that I barely saw him do it. But I have worked with him over the last year and he has come leaps and bounds. He never lunges at me, never hisses or growls, doesn't so much as open his mouth at me, I can hold him, and he takes food from me so gentle. He is 3 1/2 feet now and I love him to death. I know most of you won't understand how I could love a dumb reptile. But they are alot smarter then people give them credit for. Oh yeah, he knows his name. When I call to him he raises his head and gets ready to eat. I taught him his name in about 2 weeks.

WherzRoony
15th of December 2010 (Wed), 14:04
Well, When they get too big, they are tasty. Kind-of a cross between chicken and fish.

JoseyGator
15th of December 2010 (Wed), 14:47
Well, When they get too big, they are tasty. Kind-of a cross between chicken and fish.

Not only am I a vegan, but I would never eat him! That's like saying your dog tastes like chicken. I am sure some people in some countries would agree with me. And I know, before a bunch of people say they aren't anything like a dog, they aren't. But he is my beloved pet all the same.

picturepages
26th of December 2010 (Sun), 21:59
heh...neat that this came up again.
For an update.
He still has the alligators. They are doing great. He actually brought them to an exotic animal show here in town this summer and his child was holding it for a newspaper shot.

It did get some attention and he did have to get papers and show that he was caring for them properly.
He actually does very well with them and they havnt grown much. He recently moved to house them better and during the moving process he would put them in the bathtub and they would just sit and wait. No problems.

He has other reptiles and what not and this is not an odd thing for him to have.
I have changed my mind on him having them and he has showed me that they can make "pets".