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Savphoto
1st of October 2008 (Wed), 20:04
I don't know if this part of the forum just deals with video from dslr's, but here's a small test clip from my Canon hv30. It's a clip of a skateboarding trick that I tried to slow down. If you have any questions, feel free to ask...

HV30 Slow motion test (http://vimeo.com/1827263)

Zepher
4th of October 2008 (Sat), 08:24
Looks pretty sweet.

Stealthy Ninja
7th of October 2008 (Tue), 23:15
What editing program did you use?

If you use Final Cut Pro, you should consider (on a clip like that) messing around with the time remapping (ie speed up parts and slow down parts).

http://divergentshadows.com/dv/fcp/notes/speed.shtml

Tip: Use the pen tool to add keyframes (helps).

Looks good BTW. :D

Savphoto
9th of October 2008 (Thu), 02:10
Thanks, I use Sony Vegas. I'm able to slow/speed parts easily in this program. I just wanted the full clip slow.

Severechase
14th of October 2008 (Tue), 16:21
Nice video, but as for the video camera, the HV30 is a POS, if doing any shooting in Low light its about worthless..

gooble
14th of October 2008 (Tue), 22:15
Forgive my ignorance but how fast do you have to shoot to get smooth slow motion? Does the hv30 have variable shutter speed?

Savphoto
18th of October 2008 (Sat), 17:14
Ya, unfortunately it is crap at low light, haha. But overall, I like it.

But you are able to change the shutter speed. From 1/15th to 1/2000th.

dogwalker
28th of October 2008 (Tue), 01:46
Nice video. We bought an HV30 a few months ago, and my son and I are dabbling with it (him more than me). He wants to do the slo-motion test as well. We have Sony Vegas Pro 8, and we just haven't taken the time to do it yet. We know we can easily CTRL- click to change the duration of an event, but I was wondering if you've found any "best" shutter speeds for slow-motion (and heck, for fast-motion, too - we're thinking of videoing us doing yard work, then speeding it up to a very short, fast clip).

BTW, we love the HV30, but it's amazing how fast the AVCHD stuff is catching up now. We chose tape because we both want frame-editing, but the bit rate on the AVCHD is now very good. Ah, well, what can you do. :-)

Peter Salvia
31st of October 2008 (Fri), 13:43
I love my HV30 but yes, low light shooting is not its best suit. One of the first things I ran into was trying to remove the accessory shoe that's tethered to the camera now (wasn't previously on the HV20 that my brother and Dad own). Here's a post that details how to remove it safely and successfully:

http://petersalvia.wordpress.com/2008/08/01/canon-hv30-accessory-shoe-removal/

Hope this helps!

statsman
5th of November 2008 (Wed), 13:27
The HV30 is one of the camcorders I am looking at to capture my kid's HS indoor basketball games. Nothing fancy, just sitting at the top of the stands with the camcorder focused on the offensive end of the court. I may take the opportunity to pan the action as time goes on. The HS gyms in our area range from fairly bright to what I would call "overcast".

I am also considering the HF11 or HG-21/HG-20, but I keep hearing about issues with recording fast motion under AVCHD (MPEG-4) as compared to MPEG-2. For my basketball shooting needs, would I be better off sticking with an MPEG-2 camcorder (which typically means miniDV tapes) or would an AVCHD camcorder be sufficient?

Budget would be anything up to $2000. I am already figuring in the purchase of an external microphone to better pick up sounds from the court and to minimize the sounds coming from the camcorder and the fans near by.

JayCee Images
14th of November 2008 (Fri), 17:49
Nice video, but as for the video camera, the HV30 is a POS

ORLY?

Name a sub 800 dollar camcorder thats going to do a better job...

joruiz
15th of November 2008 (Sat), 18:49
I have the HV30 and I have to admit I was a bit dissapointed by the noise in low light, but before the HV30 I had a Sony TRV17, and it was no better. So I'm guessing there will be no sub $1000 camera that will give me a noise free image in low light. On the other hand I'm spoiled with my Panasonic AG-DVX100AP, a fantastic SD camera. The HV30 rocks in good light, it's a good camera for family use.

statsman
17th of November 2008 (Mon), 14:57
The HV30 rocks in good light, it's a good camera for family use.
How about filming indoor high school basketball with the HV30? Is there enough light in most HS gyms for the HV30 to be a decent performer?

Matthew Craggs
17th of November 2008 (Mon), 16:33
The HV30 is bad in low light, but what situations would you need to shoot in low light outside of a wedding, recital with minimal lighting, or family event (in which case noise isn't as important as the content)?

For professional purposes you'll want to move onto a 3 chipper but for personal use, or daylight shooting, it produces a great image and has the manual controls to take your personal video an extra step further. Plus you can put a home made 35mm adapter on there for next to nothing and get some stuff that looks like it was make with a $10,000 camera assuming the lighting is right and the camera is handled well.

It will be a great camera for a high school basketball game, no worries there.

statsman
17th of November 2008 (Mon), 16:51
The HV30 is bad in low light, but what situations would you need to shoot in low light outside of a wedding, recital with minimal lighting, or family event (in which case noise isn't as important as the content)?

.
.
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It will be a great camera for a high school basketball game, no worries there.
High school basketball is the primary reason why I am getting a camcorder, with the HV30 the leading candidate. I just couldn't deal with taking photos and watching the games at the same time. If I were doing this for a living, that would be a different story. But this is for personal interest and maybe that of some of the other parents. Good to hear that the HV30 will do well under the lights of a typical HS basketball gym.

I just haven't convinced myself that I will tolerate panning the camcorder back and forth while watching the games. Someone on another forum suggested sitting as high up in the stands as possible and shoot the games in a mostly static, wide fashion. But even with a WA adapter for the HV30, I don't think I can get away without some panning unless I choose to fix the camcorder mostly on the offensive end of the court.

maxse
2nd of December 2008 (Tue), 19:49
quick question.

Which Canon camer performs better in low light than the HV20. My father is looking for a camera that performs well in low-light. Budget is up to $1000.

BlindGuyTakingPictures
2nd of December 2008 (Tue), 20:14
quick question.

Which Canon camer performs better in low light than the HV20. My father is looking for a camera that performs well in low-light. Budget is up to $1000.

You are going to have to pay more than the $1K for a camera that is going to be good in low light. As far as the HV30 being a POS well, based on just about all the reviews, it can't be beat especially for the price.

Are there better cameras especially for low light? Yes, but expect to pay twice as much.

BlindGuyTakingPictures
2nd of December 2008 (Tue), 20:20
I don't know if this part of the forum just deals with video from dslr's, but here's a small test clip from my Canon hv30. It's a clip of a skateboarding trick that I tried to slow down. If you have any questions, feel free to ask...

HV30 Slow motion test (http://vimeo.com/1827263)

I have been researching these camcorders and decided on the HV30. I have been trying to find one for a good price that also includes a reputable extended warranty service. Your video has confirmed by decision.

maxse
3rd of December 2008 (Wed), 15:46
Hmmm I see thanks. Would mounting a light on top of the HV30 make it able to shoot in "low-light." Also what is the next camera in terms of a step up in low-light?

And lastly, How does the HV30 compare to say an HG21? Are these things exactly the same just different recording medium? Any suggestions?

Severechase
4th of December 2008 (Thu), 02:51
All the SD camcorders on the market 2 years ago do better in Low Light than the HV models, I had an HV20 for a while but quickly ditched the POS, it was pretty much worthless in what is sometimes even hard to consider Low Light. I changed to a Sony, which was a little better, but still not good. IMO its really not worth having HD unless you can spend 3000 or more, otherwise all you end up with is High Def noise. For 1000 your still better off forgetting about HD and opting for a prosumer SD like a Sony VX2100 or equivalent...

maxse
4th of December 2008 (Thu), 17:43
Any thoughts on the HF100?

BlindGuyTakingPictures
4th of December 2008 (Thu), 18:48
Any thoughts on the HF100?


Here is a quote from one of the reviews:

"Though the HF100 incorporates a smaller, 1/3.2-inch 3.3-megapixel CMOS sensor than the HV30 and the CX7, the video still looks quite good: properly exposed, nicely saturated, and sharp. As expected, in low light the video displays more noise and a somewhat compressed tonal range, but retains a significant amount of detail and fares above average compared with the rest of its class."

osv
5th of December 2008 (Fri), 13:49
High school basketball is the primary reason why I am getting a camcorder, with the HV30 the leading candidate. I just couldn't deal with taking photos and watching the games at the same time. If I were doing this for a living, that would be a different story. But this is for personal interest and maybe that of some of the other parents. Good to hear that the HV30 will do well under the lights of a typical HS basketball gym.

you don't want a tape-based camera for shooting sports, because all of the pausing is hard on the tape mechanism, specifically, there is too much head wear... been there, done that.

the hf11/hg20 is better than the hv30, but you'll need at least a core2duo to edit the files with... preferably a quad-core computer.