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View Full Version : Baiting Great Grey Owls..ethical or not?


IanD
20th of February 2005 (Sun), 15:43
I was out this morning chasing the owls around on Ile Bizard. Really a nice day but a little chilly. I was really happy to see a great number of folks from State side driving around and enjoying the Greys. Stopped and talked to a lot of nice folks from VT, Mass, NY and Conn. Most were just bird watchers but a couple had made the journey to photograph the owls.
We were watching one owl that always perchs in the same tree when 2 cars roll up and stop. A couple of guys get out and ask where the owl is. I point him out, about 80 feet away up in a tree about 15 feet off the ground. They both dive into their cars and start dragging out camera equipment. One had a DRebel with a 100-400 and the other chap have a Nikon film camera with a wide angle. The one chap says, "OK it is my turn for a closeup" and with that proceeds to stick his hand in a box in the car can pull out a very lively mouse. They both crawl into the ditch and lay down facing the owl who is now kind of interested in the squirming thing in the guys hand. Once they were ready, the guy with the mouse tosses it in front of himself, maybe 3 feet. Like a lightening bolt, the owls dives for the mouse, lands right in front of the guys and of course, catches the store bought rodent and swallows it. This happens twice, even though between mice, I have told the chaps that baiting the owls with live mice is not legal in Quebec. They turned pretty deaf pretty quickly.
The worst part is that a couple of cars of birders stopped and witnessed this. They were not impressed with the 2 photographers baiting the owls. I had returned to the Az and shot a bunch of images of them from there as all i had with me was the 400 prime. I also recorded their license plates.
When they had left I was questioned by the birders whether all photographers did stuff like this to attract birds and get the shot. Not a good feeling.
My question is, I am just a goodie two shoes, wanting to photograph nature really in nature and under their conditions with out interference from man and having to work a little for the shot or is baiting to get the shot OK? In the space of maybe 2 minutes, these two got a bunch of images that a lot of folks I know have worked hard for a month to get.
I don't know, maybe it is just me but I think it was totally wrong and does not help other photographers in the eyes of the birding community.
http://www.pbase.com/giant001/image/39977684.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/giant001/image/39977679.jpg

CyberDyneSystems
20th of February 2005 (Sun), 16:03
No,. your not a goody two shoes,. they are jackasses :(

It's not even a question of just baiting,. which is bad I guess to any degree,. but it's how there doing it. (one could "bait" in a way that provides enough distance from yourself that the owl would never associate the reward with a human,.. most people would at elast be clever enough to do this.) In this case,. they have gotten the owl "trained" to expect this from humans,. and well, quite frankly this is just dangerous to the animal in the long run :(

Also Ian,. and I do not mean to take anything at all away from your fantastic images,. but this does explain a little bit as to why the owls seem interested in you, and your big white lens,..

You really do not see a smart predetor like that Owl wanting to get near people unless there is something "wrong"

These guys are indeed causing harm,.. and it could very well end up being the death of these owls if they lose there sense of caution around humans. :(

Lastly,. I think I know who these guys are,. as they have been posting on FM forums,. if I am not mistaken. Don't hold me to it,. but if another superb ctop of Grey owl closeups appear there tonight,. they will hear about this in public.

Turbowolf
20th of February 2005 (Sun), 16:04
Great, just great...

Perhaps I should start baiting the wolves, then perhaps a grizzly or two. Better yet, let's bait in the fox, maybe just a few meals here and there. That way when I miss a few photo days (or weeks), and it has come to depend or rely on the handouts, it can starve. Then what photo's you would have already taken are really yours ... no one else will ever shoot that animal.

Or then again, lets humanize the coyotes more. Get them used to scraps of food, and after a few months they should be real easy to take pictures of, you'll just need to PS the shots and take out the garbage cans in the photo.

Sorry, but as you can see this issue places me high up on the soap-box.

The animals have a hard enough time in winter. By providing an alternate and unreliable easy food source the animals behavior changes. I'd rather shoot a wild animal than one on the way to being acclimated or tamed to human presence.

Maybe it's just me, but a wild thing is a thing of beauty - zoo animals and acclimated beggars just turn me off to photography. The photo is worth a lot more to me when I have taken the time to learn my subjects behavior and ranges.

LazyPhotographer
20th of February 2005 (Sun), 16:04
I think it's wrong to bait a wild animal. Feeding critters in a busy family park or picnic area to get a shot, to me, is OK because they're used to the people and the free food. But to feed a wild animal for a shot is wrong - especially since most people don't have the honor to say it was a bribe shot.

Ian, this kind of evidence is exactly what some other sites need to see. There's no sport in baiting and it's really unfair to advertise shots as wild and free when they're staged. I like your honesty and I appreciate how it makes us question our own behaviour.

I manage to get pretty close to raptors (for some heavenly reason unknown to me) and I do, every now and then, think about bringing along a mouse or two. Never done it though, and probably won't - I'd be too afraid that Mother Nature would get pissed and take away my future photo ops.

CyberDyneSystems
20th of February 2005 (Sun), 16:10
Well,. I just checked FM,..

Two new Owl posts,. but both in Northern minnesota. However,. looking at the images,. I think BOTH were bating.. it's just too coincidental that they both managed to catch the Owl during a succesfull hunt. Christ I thought these guys were all nocturnal hunters. The mice sure don't wander around during the day :(

One fo them is indeed a store bought white mouse :mad:

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/186382
http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/185992/2

PacAce
20th of February 2005 (Sun), 16:17
I share the same sentiments as the others here. I think it's totally wrong to put these owls in this type of a situation that in the long will do more harm than good to it. And I also think that it was very dishonest and just plain unethical for these so called photographers to use a live bait or two just to get a couple of shots that they can boast about. And it doesn't do any good for the reputation of bird photograhers in the eyes of the rest of the birding community.

LazyPhotographer
20th of February 2005 (Sun), 16:22
I also wondered about these incredible images. How do they get these at only 300mm??

http://www.naturescapes.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=32721
http://www.naturescapes.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=32360

Edit - you'll probably have to join to see the images. It's free.

CyberDyneSystems
20th of February 2005 (Sun), 22:09
Well,

Having just made an ass of myself on another forum (as I am so uniquely skilled to do ;) )

I got this reply which may shed some light on the subject,

Actually...that is not really true at all. While that sentiment does apply to wild animals, and *may* be appropriate here, the reality is that these birds are tame simply because where they come from there are *no* people, so they have developed no fear. This is very common in northern owls, like the Great Gray, Snowy, Boreal and Hawk Owls. I have seen them in their native haunts in northern Canada, where no one was feeding them mice--and they are very tame. I was able to touch a Boreal Owl sitting in a tree, and all it did was open one eye and glare at me.

Jeff

In other words,. Ians photos are still of butheads,. but these fine shots we are seeing are not necesarily related,. (Ians shots for instance certainly bare this out )

The conclusion I was jumpoing to,. was that part of the Owls freindliness was perhaps a result of this "baiting" .. but others are saying this is normal for these owls.

IanD
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 06:13
Well,

Having just made an ass of myself on another forum (as I am so uniquely skilled to do ;) )

I got this reply which may shed some light on the subject,



In other words,. Ians photos are still of butheads,. but these fine shots we are seeing are not necesarily related,. (Ians shots for instance certainly bare this out )

The conclusion I was jumpoing to,. was that part of the Owls freindliness was perhaps a result of this "baiting" .. but others are saying this is normal for these owls.
CDS,
I agree with you and the chap that posted. These birds are very tame and show no fear of man because they really do not know what or who we are.
However, the two idiots I photographed baiting the owl are giving him a lesson in how to get a free lunch, just wait for a car to drive by maybe a mouse will pop out. I watched this owl for maybe 20 minutes after the fools had left and every car that came by and stopped to look at him, he swooped down out of his tree and landed close to it. Within 2 minutes he associated cars with food. This very well might cause his death.
Another thing to think about. Where did the mice, used as bait, come from? Store bought? From a lab and they were rejects? Were they health mice or diseased?
Because of their very tame nature, Great grey Owls are not that difficult to shoot. Certainly, you have to put time afield to capture the images you want but it can be done, without baiting. Luck can and does play a role in capturing flight shots and Lordy knows I've been lucky but then again, so have a lot of other folks who have spent days on the Island in quest of the owls. These two guys were just too damn lazy and ignorant and wanted the "killer" shot right away and at any cost and to hell with what might happed to the bird when they were finished. My only regret is that there was not a Game Warden close by (live baiting in Quebec is strictly prohibited). However, the images and license plate numbers of the two people involved are on their way to the authorities.

Ikinaa
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 06:26
...

Also Ian,. and I do not mean to take anything at all away from your fantastic images,. but this does explain a little bit as to why the owls seem interested in you, and your big white lens,..

...


That has something of Pavlov and his dog... except that you don't use a bell but a white lens...

Preserving Wildlife is NOT baiting wild animals to shoot (photographically) them.

IanD
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 06:42
Also Ian,. and I do not mean to take anything at all away from your fantastic images,. but this does explain a little bit as to why the owls seem interested in you, and your big white lens,..

You really do not see a smart predetor like that Owl wanting to get near people unless there is something "wrong"


CDS,
I have not heard of or seen any other people baiting owls around the Island. That is not to say that there are other folks doing this but I would like to think not. I have spent enought time there and have seen a lot of photographers and none to date has had a box full of mice. As an ex owner of a very successful guiding service, I have and always will be against any type of baiting for any purpose. If you want the shots, then use the smarts that the good lord gave you.

PacAce
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 08:17
I agree with Ian whole heartedly. The GGOs have no fear of humans and can be approached a lot closer than your usual wild bird. There really isn't any reason to bait them unless one is specifically after the "owl catches mouse and eats it" shot and is too lazy or impatient to wait for it to happen naturally. I spent half a day in Ile Bizard with Sheldon one weekend and got some pretty good "still" shots as well as a couple of sequences of flight shots. And we did encounter one owl that would have given us a good "owl catches mouse and eats it" shot except that when he hit the snow our view was obstructed by tall grass stalks and besides, he missed. :confused: But the opportunities for good GGO shots are out there to get the shots naturally. And there are quite a handful of owls that chances get even better.

Belmondo
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 09:15
I see a lot of discussion about the ethics of baiting from the standpoint of the owl, but what about the mouse? Did anybody bother to ask what he/she thinks of the practice?

steven
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 09:22
I see a lot of discussion about the ethics of baiting from the standpoint of the owl, but what about the mouse? Did anybody bother to aske what he/she thinks of the practice?

Unfortunatly all attempts to contact the mouse involved in these deplorable incident have so far failed :)

gramps
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 09:34
Unfortunatly all attempts to contact the mouse involved in these deplorable incident have so far failed :)

sure is a shame.............it appears that the mouse WAS a GREAT WHITE SNOWSHOE MOUSE!!!!! Very rare mouse to see in the wild.

jaypie77
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 09:37
As somebody involved with wildlife authorities in the US, I think you need to report these guys immediately and out them. This kind of behavior is dangerous and these guys should not be allowed to profit from it. If this kind of thing is allowed to go unpunished, then it will lead to a monkey-see, monkey-do reaction from others who might not have thought about doing it themselves.

Big_B
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 09:41
I see a lot of discussion about the ethics of baiting from the standpoint of the owl, but what about the mouse? Did anybody bother to aske what he/she thinks of the practice?

True, but I didn't ask my turkey at Christmas either ;)

robertwgross
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 10:22
I see a lot of discussion about the ethics of baiting from the standpoint of the owl, but what about the mouse? Did anybody bother to ask what he/she thinks of the practice?

Somebody asked the mouse if it wanted to go to lunch, and it didn't ask questions.

---Bob Gross---

Bruce Hamilton
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 10:52
While everyone is bashing these two guys for tossing an owl a mouse as TFP, aren't you also baiting wild animals when you hang up a bird feeder in the winter? Depending on where you reside, birds aren't the only thing you'll attract. Skunk, fox, and bear have no problem with you feeding them. Legalities aside, you can't bash someone for feeding an owl when you go home and feed chickadees.

stoneylonesome
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 10:52
I associate that type of baiting in the same class as Jacking Deer, I know in Vermont even if you swing your car headlights into a field and shine them on deer you are subject to arrest. I can see setting up a camo blind and maybe throwing some apples out to attract a deer or corn for some wild turkeys,or whatever, and you hide in the blind, as long as you are the only one around, the animal doesn't see you so doesn't associate the food with humans. but what they did was just plain STUPID and uncalled for. But then again there are JERKS in every hobby and sport. and the give a bad name to all of us. The reason Vermont is so strict is not that you the driver plan to do harm to the deer but that some A*hole may take advantage of the situation and do harm. I personally think what they did was wrong. Just a bunch of show offs. Who couldn't get a good photo any other way. I personally would never bait, part of the challange is getting the photo the hard way, At least than you have really earned it and can be proud in the shot. Same goes for hunting or fishing I would never bait or chum. Just seems like cheating to me.

robertwgross
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 11:19
Ethics aside, in each jurisdiction, either it is legal or illegal.

If it is illegal, then turn over the offender's vehicle license number to the authorities. Simple as that.

Then the authorities will set up a "sting" operation. One of these days we will go sneaking up on a Great Gray Owl and suddenly notice that it is actually a robotic owl with a video camera inside it shooting the photographer's actions.

---Bob Gross---

IanD
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 11:19
While everyone is bashing these two guys for tossing an owl a mouse as TFP, aren't you also baiting wild animals when you hang up a bird feeder in the winter? Depending on where you reside, birds aren't the only thing you'll attract. Skunk, fox, and bear have no problem with you feeding them. Legalities aside, you can't bash someone for feeding an owl when you go home and feed chickadees.
Bruce,
The issue here is not the feeding of wild aminals. It is very legal to place winter food for deer, elk, birds etc,(carrots, hay etc.) as long as the feed you are using is not alive. The wardens that have been contacted and that are looking into this matter are very concerned about the practice and will be patroling Ile Bizard for offeders. A bird feeder filled with seed is not the same as releasing live store bought mice. In reality, someone with a little time and patience can get some really great owl shots by just waiting. you just have to be in the right place at the right time.

IanD
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 11:20
As somebody involved with wildlife authorities in the US, I think you need to report these guys immediately and out them. This kind of behavior is dangerous and these guys should not be allowed to profit from it. If this kind of thing is allowed to go unpunished, then it will lead to a monkey-see, monkey-do reaction from others who might not have thought about doing it themselves.
The proper authorities have been contacted and are looking into this.

robertwgross
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 11:43
The proper authorities have been contacted and are looking into this.

Excellent. Then relax, enjoy your great owl photos, and have a nice cold one to drink.

---Bob Gross---

CyberDyneSystems
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 11:45
Also Ian,. and I do not mean to take anything at all away from your fantastic images,. but this does explain a little bit as to why the owls seem interested in you, and your big white lens,..

You really do not see a smart predetor like that Owl wanting to get near people unless there is something "wrong"


Again,. just want to mention that I said this before I understood the behavior of these magnificent creatures in there natural environment,. It was a mistaken assumption on my part,. a conclusion I drew without enough information.

My apologeis.

Ian, I'm glad you were therer to catch these buttheads in the act. ;)

PacAce
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 12:26
While everyone is bashing these two guys for tossing an owl a mouse as TFP, aren't you also baiting wild animals when you hang up a bird feeder in the winter? Depending on where you reside, birds aren't the only thing you'll attract. Skunk, fox, and bear have no problem with you feeding them. Legalities aside, you can't bash someone for feeding an owl when you go home and feed chickadees.
With a bird feeder, the foold is there almost all the time. I think that's one difference. On top of that, the birds are in your territory, so to speak, and not the other way around.

CyberDyneSystems
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 12:35
Also,. most birds at bidfeeders will take off as soon as they see a human,. for me th issue is the familiarization.

Someone mentioned that "baiting" using a blind is a very different issue,. it may still be illegal in most places,. but I have to agree. Although there are other concerns with baiting,. the primary one I would have with what these jokers did in Ians photos is exposing the birds to the dangers inherent to wild animals that become accustomed to humans feeding them.

This past weekend teh headline on one of our local news TV stations was "Coyotes! What needs to be done about them BEFORE some one gets hurt"

In other words,. the very terms used on this news trailer that was shown dozens of times during commercial breaks for the duration of the wekenad was in plain text advocating that the existance of the Coyotees was a problem that needs a solution BEFORE the problem actually starts.

What does this have to sdo with the Owl baiting? Nothing ! :rolleyes:

Other than to illustrate that predators like these live in a diferent world from the one that we have chosen to make for ourselves,. and that for the animal,.. when the boundaries are blurred ,. it is ALLWAYS the animal that looses.

chris.bailey
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 13:43
They are not tame as that suggests prolonged human contact but they do not relate humans as a predator and therefore a risk. This practice suggests they soon will do.

In the UK at least, many garden birds would die during the winter month and feeding is recommended by the RSPB, our learned authority.

To suggest the two practices are in any way linked ...... nuff said.

tommykjensen
21st of February 2005 (Mon), 13:47
In the UK at least, many garden birds would die during the winter month and feeding is recommended by the RSPB, our learned authority.


In Denmark the advice is, if You start to feed the birds in Your garden then You must continue to do so.

CyberDyneSystems
22nd of February 2005 (Tue), 00:50
One would need to understand some ratehr complex differnces between the behavior and feeding habits of migratory birds Vs. these predators,. not just the fundamental differnce between growing attached to a feeder, vs. a human being. The feeder birds leave when you come out of your house. They do not associate you with the food.

Again,. it is two completely different things.

Bruce Hamilton
22nd of February 2005 (Tue), 19:10
The feeder birds leave when you come out of your house. They do not associate you with the food.

Oh, yes they do. We feed birds during the winter months, and when we go out to fill the feeders, all they do is move a few feet away from the feeders and wait until we're gone. They know why we're there.

Avalonthas
22nd of February 2005 (Tue), 20:40
I say u should report em. I dont like those who cut corners to get there shots. Good that u prefer to do it the hard way IanD.

canondslruser
2nd of March 2005 (Wed), 13:17
Besides the legality issue, baiting owls or any other wild creature will make them associate man with food. I saw this very thing happen while touring the Cabot Trail last Summer. Some guy who should have known better was feeding a coyote by the side of the road next to one of the hiking trails. The next day, the warden had to close the hiking trail because the coyote became aggressive toward some of the hikers. The warden thinks the aggressive behaviour was likely the result of people feeding it and the animal quickly associates people, hikers in this case, as a source of food. Also, it is illegal to feed wild animals along the part of the Cabot Trail which runs through Cape Breton Highlands National Park. And now you know why.

As for the Great Gray Owls I have had much success with photographing them this winter. You just have to know where to look for them. And they are very tame. I have seen one hunt as close as 10 feet from where I happened to be standing. I have seen Great Gray Owls catching and devouring numbers of rodents from quite close up on many occasion.

I have read that some people do bait the Great Gray Owls. One can purchase live mice in a pet shop for a small price or even dead ones for even less. Pet stores sell these mice to people who own exotic type pets like snakes, etc. There was a recent report on Ontbirds about this one rental van with a number of people inside pulling to the side of the road. Shortly after that a Great Gray Owl dove right in front of it to take the offered mouse.

Just wondering about Ile Bizzard in Montreal. Is this a known spot for Great Grays and are they still there in good numbers? What part of the island are they usually found in?

Eastcoast
27th of January 2008 (Sun), 18:55
I notice that this topic has arisen again in the Bird Forum only in respect to the Great White Owl. I find it a sad commentary that we are going around this topic again after only a couple of years on this one. :(

My personal opinion is that this is not in the spirit of capturing the bird in its wild setting. If the rodent is there naturally then shoot away.

If baiting is required to get these stupendous pictures then perhaps an aviary would be a perfect setting to get them.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Twitch1977
28th of January 2008 (Mon), 09:18
To me the baiting the animal to get a good shot isn't an ethical concern, hell I bait squirrels with trail mix all the time. I also understand that the mice in pet stores often end up as food for snakes, centipedes, etc just as often as they end up as pets.

It's still something I could never do though, maybe I'm a softy but it'd break my heart to toss out a poor little mouse to it's death.

Kurt

ssim
28th of January 2008 (Mon), 14:21
To me the baiting the animal to get a good shot isn't an ethical concern, hell I bait squirrels with trail mix all the time.
Kurt

It is absolutely ethical. It doesn't make much sense to equate squirrels with these owls. I was in the mix of shooting these owls that winter in Montreal. These birds had no fear of humans, you could literally walk up to within a couple of feet of most of them. If they learned that we are a food source for them they can really get themselves into trouble with some of the less desirables in our species. The squirrels are well aware that we are a food source.

It got downright stupid that winter to the point where the local pet stores would not sell the mice to anyone except their regular customers which was a relief to a number of us.

I personally do not support baiting wildlife simply so that someone can get a nice picture. If you want to shoot wildlife then work for it.

Pete
28th of January 2008 (Mon), 14:31
Baiting wildlife for a goot photo is wrong, for all of the reasons stated above.

However, if the feeding is done as part of a conservation program, then discrete photography while this happens is often worthwhile.

Take Gigrin Farm http://www.gigrin.co.uk/

I've never been there, but by all accounts, it's a great place to get good feeing shots in a tightly controlled manner.

snowyowl13
24th of March 2008 (Mon), 09:04
This is a fascinating thread. I'm not sure that the group against baiting have really made their case. If, as one person said, owls have come within 10" of him when they were hunting mice how does that differ from the impact of bringing an owl to 10' using a bait mouse?
And for the record I've never tried using live bait nor do I plan to but I had intended to use predator calls and leave out seed bait, fox bait etc. That sort of baiting can also have an impact. Look also at the way eagles are fed in many places as way for letting people get close to them.
This is really a far reaching subject and I hope the discussion continues.

S.Horton
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 15:25
+1 -- If the practice does no harm.

A view:
http://www.birddigiscoping.com/2007/02/more-about-baiting-wild-owls.html

Contrary:
http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html

photo.net debate, same subject:
http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=00FRp2

ashleynaugust
5th of April 2008 (Sat), 22:58
My uncle is a birder and raptor rehabilitator, and he would be VERY upset to hear of this. I hope they are apprehended.

He has saved many owls, hawks, kites, you name it. He strives for anonymity with the birds, so that they never should see him (or a human) and directly associate it with food. They are very intelligent animals (just ask my parrot, he'll tell you, lol!).

My uncle rehab'ed a barn owl, for its wing to mend. It was released many miles away. Several weeks after the release, he was walking through his yard to feed his dog some scraps with a plate on his hand, and the owl dived out of a tree, grabbing the plate and my uncle's hands with his sharp talons, and scraping my uncle's arm up very well.

What would happen if the owl being baited gets more tame, and one day a child gets out of the car with a small plush toy? Then it is not only the bird, but a child in danger. :(

chauncey
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 00:41
Would you have any qualms about using a "wounded rabbit" bird call?

S.Horton
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 09:06
Myself -- I plan to use the distress call and a decoy.

Once.

In a remote place on RR tracks.

I think that people are really afraid of repeating what has happened in parks like Shenandoah (VA, USA, http://www.nps.gov/shen/) where tourists on SkyLine drive spoiled the animals.

And, yeah, people do get hurt.

chauncey
6th of April 2008 (Sun), 09:51
Well let us see here:

Baiting occasionally, distress call or whatever and the ability to use a less expensive lens
and more possible for the physically disadvantaged to get the shot.

Or the other way:

Hours spent in a blind or laying on your belly on cold ground with an obscenely expensive lens (IMHO)

Ah...lemme think here...it's option number one in a heartbeat.

neilwood32
7th of April 2008 (Mon), 08:22
Seems like theres 2 schools of thought:

1) Bait - be lazy, possibly harm the animals long term survival and get a shot without any effort at all

or

2) Use some effort - setting up a blind, and waiting to get a good shot with an expensive lens.

I would have to take 2- i would rather not damage the bird's long term chances to get an easy shot. If you cant put up with the physical conditions, then enjoy the photo's from someone who did rather than someone who is jeopardising the species!

chauncey
7th of April 2008 (Mon), 10:09
I come from a long line of hunters and used to think that the "hard way" was much more sporting. That is, until the spotlight at night was necessary to put food on the table.
Now, in my advancing years, and conversion to photography, the hard way is no longer an option.

Would I do it long term? No. But...
You cannot convince me that an "occasional" bait does anything for the long term survival of any wild animal.
Unless the baiter is packing a firearm.

canonloader
7th of April 2008 (Mon), 13:22
I am too lazy to even bait and I won't pretend I am any better or worse than those who do or don't. Like what I guesstimate to be 999 out of a thousand other bird photographers, I am content to look at the images of others who get predatory birds photos by baiting or stealth. ;)

In the overall scheme of things, a group of photographers baiting one Snowy Owl or a couple eagles here and there is going to make absolutely no impact on either species as a whole.

Peeps, this is a non-issue. Shouldn't you be more worried about the styrofoam cup you just added to a landfill today?