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r.morales
18th of December 2008 (Thu), 23:38
Anybody still use it ? Are there big drives for it ?

OdiN1701
19th of December 2008 (Fri), 00:09
It's less used with SATA being out now as far as on desktop/workstation systems.

Serial-Attached SCSI is replacing it.

I don't see any use for it on a desktop/workstation unless you are doing heavy video editing or anything that does a lot of hard drive read/writes.

tim
19th of December 2008 (Fri), 00:58
I don't see any need for it for a single user PC.

Zepher
19th of December 2008 (Fri), 01:25
It's less used with SATA being out now as far as on desktop/workstation systems.

Serial-Attached SCSI is replacing it.

I don't see any use for it on a desktop/workstation unless you are doing heavy video editing or anything that does a lot of hard drive read/writes.

SCSI isn't required for heavy video editing anymore.
I retired my pair of 36Gig 10,000RPM SCSI Cheetahs a few years ago since regular 7200rpm SATA drives were outperforming them on my single user/single access system (which is what 99% of most people's machines are classified as).
$$$/GB was much much higher with SCSI as well.

morpheus6d9
19th of December 2008 (Fri), 01:31
scsi is still used business wise

joeseph
19th of December 2008 (Fri), 02:23
I don't see any need for it.
you'd need it for business-grade tape backup systems (LTO types etc) but certainly in terms of hard drive connectivity it's dying - largest drive I remember seeing is about 180Gb - quick check & HP sell a 300Gb one RRP is NZD$1995.00 +GST
I have no other way of connecting my Epson Filmscan 200 scanner however... :p

tim
19th of December 2008 (Fri), 02:58
I should've made it more clear I don't see any need for it for individuals, businesses maybe.

r.morales
21st of December 2008 (Sun), 09:43
I was just asking . Since apple went to firewire Scsi is no good for me . Guess I'll just recycle cable and drives .

Faolan
21st of December 2008 (Sun), 10:12
I still use some 73Gb/146Gb SCSI drives, but I'm transitioning to a SAS setup in the new year. The largest you can get is 300Gb but at that point you're better of going down the SAS route.

SCSI is still fast when you're using 15k drives, but if you're using 10k spindles then you're better off getting WD Raptors for a SATA interface which can also be used on a SAS controller.

The great advantage of SCSI is you can pick up the hardware relatively cheaply these days or if you know a IT techie who works in a server farm you might be able to scavange drives from retired servers.

Bobster
22nd of December 2008 (Mon), 13:52
i have 8x 18GB Seagate 15K SCSI drives sat in my garage gathering dust.. SATA just does the job too well now..

r.morales
22nd of December 2008 (Mon), 14:21
The scsi drives I have are small - like 8 gig down . I have an adapter from scsi to fire wire for negative scanner but everything else is firewire . I just hate throwing away good stuff .
I also have some USE to something - like a plug to canon but different .

Zepher
23rd of December 2008 (Tue), 00:53
i have 8x 18GB Seagate 15K SCSI drives sat in my garage gathering dust.. SATA just does the job too well now..

If you need to heat your room, might want to hook them up.
I could cook on my 10K Cheetahs.

tkbslc
23rd of December 2008 (Tue), 11:06
scsi is still used business wise

Actually you cannot buy SCSI drives or controllers on any new server or PC from the major HW makers. You have the new SAS drives and you can use SATA.

(I guess technically SAS is the new SCSI)

Faolan
23rd of December 2008 (Tue), 15:24
Actually you cannot buy SCSI drives or controllers on any new server or PC from the major HW makers. You have the new SAS drives and you can use SATA.

(I guess technically SAS is the new SCSI)

Yes you can, we've just rolled out over 40 HP ML350 G5s with SCSI cards and hard drives...

However you're right for the most part in that SAS has taken the place of SCSI.