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alvezz
18th of January 2009 (Sun), 13:33
hi,

i am really new to photography and literally have had my 40d (first DSLR) for a few days after a few months looking for an SLR to start me off in the right direction. i have a course in photography booked in april but cant wait until then to start learning. i have really been inspired by some of the photos posted and has given me some good ideas, but really wanted to have a go at bodyscape as it appears to require the least amount of equipment and i have no accessories as i blew my entire budget on the Camera.

Please could anyone help me in how to set up lighting to shoot bodyscape?

i have Canon 40d, 18-55mm kit lens, tripod and a model..........just need a basic set up to start me off so i can trial an error with the shots from there.

any help would be gratfully appreciated !

Alvezz

Dudley Watson
1st of February 2009 (Sun), 19:42
Alvezz, you answered you own question. "Trial an error" is one way to learn. If you've never worked with the model before, I suggest a few clothed shots first to get to know each other. PM me at dbphoto@computerconnect.net if you have more questions.

inthedeck
2nd of February 2009 (Mon), 13:38
Use window light, since you have nothing but the onboard flash. If she's not around during a day where you are, use a teddy bear by the window, just to check what works best, in terms of exposure, shutter speed, etc. Then, you can use white foamboard to fill in shadows, by reflecting the light from the window, as well.

Enjoy.

hawk911
3rd of February 2009 (Tue), 09:44
Use window light, since you have nothing but the onboard flash. If she's not around during a day where you are, use a teddy bear by the window, just to check what works best, in terms of exposure, shutter speed, etc. Then, you can use white foamboard to fill in shadows, by reflecting the light from the window, as well.

Enjoy.

exactly what I'd have suggested. good for bodyscape, or a nice simple portrait too. try to use a northern-facing window if you have one, or you'll have to pull her out of the direct light for more diffused light.

alvezz
4th of February 2009 (Wed), 08:07
thanks guys, nice to get a couple of basic pointers to start my trial and error sessons off.

cant wait to start...........

inthedeck
4th of February 2009 (Wed), 08:24
Good luck with it...just have fun, and don't get caught up in all the hype. I'm sure you'll be a bit nervous, at first, but, try to make it so it doen't appear that way. That's all. ;)

alvezz
11th of February 2009 (Wed), 16:02
are there any lights i could use around the house to get a similar effect such as a torch, bedside lamp etc? or is a soft box (i think that what is used on bodyscape) the only way to go.

inthedeck
11th of February 2009 (Wed), 16:35
try a table lamp, through a white sheet. See how that goes. Just a thought.

hawk911
11th of February 2009 (Wed), 18:48
try a table lamp, through a white sheet. See how that goes. Just a thought.

Even the table lamp is going to be dim. The sheet is going to block almost all the light, I bet.

inthedeck
11th of February 2009 (Wed), 18:54
How about a table lamp through a sheer cloth? Or two table lamps, bounced off a white piece of foam board? We gotta help the person somehow...hahaha.

hawk911
12th of February 2009 (Thu), 23:27
The sheerer the cloth the better, unless he's turned a 500w work light into a table lamp :)

No flash units, if I read the original post correctly. Those might help also, if you could get them off camera somehow.

ss109
14th of February 2009 (Sat), 11:14
+1

North light is definatly the softest.

TooManyHobbies
17th of February 2009 (Tue), 16:09
I'll give you the super cheap with the best results idea.......

Camera on tripod set to f/8 15-20s with mirror lockup and cable release
Flashlight with plastic or black gauze fabric diffuser.

Lights on - focus on model and turn AF off.
Lights off falshlight on with hand at end to control and focus light - click to lockup mirror
click to start exposure and have model stop breathing

paint in the light
try to go over over an area only once to prevent blur from model movement but you can also soften areas by doing this

Try switching sides to get shadows in two directions without tripping over the tripod or just paint in a bodyscape outline.

alvezz
21st of February 2009 (Sat), 17:02
Great idea, I will try that on my second atempt. The first one gave me some good things of what not to do using a lamp and playing with exposure timings, all came out noisy and to light. I am trying to get the effect of the bodyscapes which look like they are almost in complete darkness with the light showing off the curves of the body. Think this is where the painting with light will be a good idea.

Thanks for all the comments

TooManyHobbies
21st of February 2009 (Sat), 17:32
I'm going to post another type of lighting for bodyscapes I just did, the moment my wife let's me away from the kids. I'm on the laptop right now and it's on the studio computer. I shot into a large softbox with grids. The softbox in the background looked cool. The body had a little side fill llight from another softbox. If I wanted a true bodyscape I just needed to turn off the one in the background. I love my softbox grids. They really help with spill.l

alvezz
22nd of February 2009 (Sun), 15:40
i can see me investing some more cash soon on lighting but at the same time i also enjoy the mind over matter in solving the improvisation aspect of this. i will get there in the end i am still going through the learning process of changing my way of thinking from a point and click to having to think about all the aspects of taking the photo.

Loving every minute of it though..........

This forum is helping me loads and cant wait to start my photography course in April....