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poole
21st of February 2009 (Sat), 11:10
Im getting ready to try shooting some stars. Give me some tips please!!

Here is my setup canon 40d. 28-200 f4.5-5.6 usm no IS. 18-55 f3.5-5.6 no IS.

I will have in the next 2 weeks: sigma 24-60 f2.8ex dg and a canon 28-135 f3.5-56. with IS

What will be my optimal setup to photo (lens, settings,etc) the stars? Im have only tried once and did not get really good results.

Long shutter, got that....white balance daylight "I think"..anything else?

hollis_f
21st of February 2009 (Sat), 11:24
Probably best to ask this in the Astronomy and Celestial Talk forum.

One thing they'd need to know is - what type of shots? Star trails? Constellations? Deep Sky objects?

poole
21st of February 2009 (Sat), 12:28
ok...got it in the correct section....Im looking to just do some still shots of the stars...Ill try trails later.

poole
21st of February 2009 (Sat), 13:18
ttt

Adrena1in
21st of February 2009 (Sat), 14:05
Generally, the wide the angle you can shoot at the longer you can expose without getting trails. At 18mm you should be able to shoot for 15 to 20 seconds and not have too noticeable a trail, and you'll capture plenty of stars.

As a relative beginner myself I tend to keep the aperture open as wide as possible, and set the ISO as high as possible too. That way I get as much light as possible onto the sensor.

Focussing is the next bit...does the 40D have Live View? If so, aim at a bright star, set focus to manual, zoom in on it and adjust the focus as best you can. You could get it close looking through the viewfinder, but Live View is better. Without Live View just do the best you can, then take a test shot of a few seconds. Preview the shot and see how it looks. If you're not happy, adjust the focus slightly and take another test shot. See if it's better or worse. Adjust focus again accordingly and take another shot. Usually takes only 7 or 8 shots and a few minutes to get focus good.

Then without touching the focus, aim at your target and shoot for 10 to 20 seconds. You should get pretty good results.

Oh, I'm assuming you're using a tripod. And best use a remote shutter release too.

poole
21st of February 2009 (Sat), 14:14
Generally, the wide the angle you can shoot at the longer you can expose without getting trails. At 18mm you should be able to shoot for 15 to 20 seconds and not have too noticeable a trail, and you'll capture plenty of stars.

As a relative beginner myself I tend to keep the aperture open as wide as possible, and set the ISO as high as possible too. That way I get as much light as possible onto the sensor.

Focussing is the next bit...does the 40D have Live View? If so, aim at a bright star, set focus to manual, zoom in on it and adjust the focus as best you can. You could get it close looking through the viewfinder, but Live View is better. Without Live View just do the best you can, then take a test shot of a few seconds. Preview the shot and see how it looks. If you're not happy, adjust the focus slightly and take another test shot. See if it's better or worse. Adjust focus again accordingly and take another shot. Usually takes only 7 or 8 shots and a few minutes to get focus good.

Then without touching the focus, aim at your target and shoot for 10 to 20 seconds. You should get pretty good results.

Oh, I'm assuming you're using a tripod. And best use a remote shutter release too.

Do have a tripod, but am just using the timer for now....have not purchased shutter release cable yet. Thanks for the info!

Adrena1in
22nd of February 2009 (Sun), 15:05
You PM'd me about what White Balance setting to use. Don't know really, I always just use Auto, but someone else might have some suggestions.

Jeff
23rd of February 2009 (Mon), 13:07
I've used Auto WB too, but if there are street lights, etc nearby you may want to change it. If you're going to be on a tripod I think a mediumish lens (30mm-50mm) and fastest f/stop available will help. Otherwise you get streaks which you said you weren't going for at the moment.