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-g-
15th of March 2009 (Sun), 22:58
C&C appreciated. I'm not used to photographing kids...

1.)

http://i597.photobucket.com/albums/tt56/Carley_H_photos/IMG_9638-Edit.jpg

2.)

http://i597.photobucket.com/albums/tt56/Carley_H_photos/IMG_9640-Edit.jpg

3.)

http://i597.photobucket.com/albums/tt56/Carley_H_photos/IMG_9642-Edit.jpg

deemarie
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 10:52
That is one cute baby, like 2 best

-g-
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 12:32
Thanks Dee. Wish I could take credit for how cute she is... :-)

Guineh
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 12:47
These look good. About the only advice I can give is watch where mom (or dad) is. A small child will very likely look right at mom or dad. Also, see if you can find a small noisy toy to get their attention and shift their gaze toward the camera. If they're to the point where they can smile and laugh, use exaggerated expressions to elicit a giggle out of them.

Note: The only child I have successfully photographed is my own, so ymmv.

Edit: Tiff would probably give you even better advice..

OceanGuy
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 12:51
Nice photos what was your light source?

Flo
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 12:52
Aww Geno.how adorable!! I like the lighting in the last one best, first two have some hot spots on her face..

-g-
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 13:24
A small child will very likely look right at mom or dad. Edit: Tiff would probably give you even better advice..

So should I be trying to get them to look into the camera? Tiff's access to the photos is blocked from her work but I sure would like her comments.

Nice photos what was your light source?

580 EX Camera mounted with a Stofen diffuser. Flash was angled up about 45 degrees.

Aww Geno.how adorable!! I like the lighting in the last one best, first two have some hot spots on her face..

Thanks, Gail. I was playing with the power on the flash but it's hard to judge using just the camera LCD.

-g-
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 13:25
..

BTW, couldn't help but notice you're dressed up for St. Paddy's Day! :lol:

Guineh
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 14:10
So should I be trying to get them to look into the camera? Tiff's access to the photos is blocked from her work but I sure would like her comments.

Generally, yes ... I think ... I'd like to see what Tiff says about this, really.

Guineh
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 14:10
BTW, couldn't help but notice you're dressed up for St. Paddy's Day! :lol:

Yep :)

linda baca
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 14:38
Nice photos. Love the curly curly hair! Adorable.

A.Tan
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 17:34
I love the expression on #3.

TheHoff
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 19:12
What great hair! Like mine as a kid but a bit darker.

OK hm the two big issues here are lighting and background. Unfortunately there isn't much more you're going to get out of an on-camera flash unless you have a white wall to bounce it off of. I'm not a big fan of ceiling bounce unless you have a big card to get some light forward -- even then, a wall is almost always a better bounce. So, have any white walls?

Other than that, I think you should invest in a simple stand/shoe/umbrella setup w/ sync cord (I forget if you have an ST-E2 or not?)

The background here doesn't hurt or contribute to the image but the problem is it is very dark. The low key type of background is a bit depressing for a kid. Better to have it lit up a bit, even if you open the lens up to drop it out of focus.

-g-
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 19:54
What great hair! Like mine as a kid but a bit darker.

OK hm the two big issues here are lighting and background. Unfortunately there isn't much more you're going to get out of an on-camera flash unless you have a white wall to bounce it off of. I'm not a big fan of ceiling bounce unless you have a big card to get some light forward -- even then, a wall is almost always a better bounce. So, have any white walls?

Other than that, I think you should invest in a simple stand/shoe/umbrella setup w/ sync cord (I forget if you have an ST-E2 or not?)

The background here doesn't hurt or contribute to the image but the problem is it is very dark. The low key type of background is a bit depressing for a kid. Better to have it lit up a bit, even if you open the lens up to drop it out of focus.

No ST-E2 but a couple PW's and a designer home with no white walls... Got some lighter ones but they are all coloured. Never thought much about the background but I get what you're saying. Now that I look, I do lose her hair in there, a lighter BG would have contrasted it nicely. Maybe next time I'll move her down to the basement where I have some seamless white rolled up.

Not sure where you're suggesting a large card on a ceiling bounce. Can you explain?

Thanks for your thoughts, Hoff. Much appreciated!

TheHoff
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 20:39
If you don't want an umbrella and stand, I bet you can come up with a cheap and handy bounce solution. How about a big white styro panel?

If you use the ceiling you need a good bounce card on the top of the flash to push some light forward, otherwise you'll get dark eye sockets.

You can also use the ceiling to bounce if it is white and you shoot down. It creates a ringlight-type wraparound light

http://s5.tinypic.com/2zye74n.jpg

http://s4.tinypic.com/2i9jbio.jpg

Often the best background for this type of shot is natural; just shoot with a wide aperture to drop it out. Or if you do use the seamless, be sure to have a cozy blanket or something so it isn't quite so stark.

-g-
16th of March 2009 (Mon), 21:21
Thanks for those tips! I originally misunderstood, I guess. You meant a large card on the flash, not a reflector to bring light from the back of the kid forward!

When shooting with the flash bounced up, how are you dealing with your shadow. Looking at your first photo, I don't see you anywhere there.

sevillafox
17th of March 2009 (Tue), 21:54
Geno, sorry to take so long.

Others have already addressed the light but I'll add my 2 cents.

I don't mind the darker background as long as the subject is brighter. With babies, I personally prefer to have them naked with a dark background or dressed in a really bright color. Dark backgrounds also work well for face shots.

While ideally we want baby to be looking at us, it doesn't always happen. Just capture the cute faces they make.

Some things you can do to get baby to look at you...a squeaky toy works well. I've been dying to try a kazoo because my mom can make a noise kind of like that with her teeth and she got some huge grins out of Aidan when he was a baby. Other things to try: a mirror just above or below your camera. Babies love other babies. You can also have the parent play peek a boo behind you. Faking a sneeze is also a good way to get a grin.

Babies rarely pose. I think photographing them is like photographing sports. Sometimes you just have to spray and pray. ;)

While these shots wouldn't make it to my wall, they are great snaps and would definitely get printed.

You did do well getting to baby's level. That's another key...get down to their height and make sure you get them face on.