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OneVisionTwoEyes
9th of May 2009 (Sat), 18:37
So im still very new to shooting.
And see all your guy's great photos.

I would love some links to some excersises to get some exp and more knowledge under my belt.

I have an XTi (Newb Camera) But its a start.

I have a 50mm and a kit lens

I would love to experiance different settings=different pictures kinda thing.

I know how to change f stops and shutter and all that but when i come up to somthing cool to shoot my first reaction is to get the light meter at 0 lol i know embarrising but thats also why im here asking for a little help.

So any one know some cool DOF, Shutter, Exposure Excersises let me know!

OneVisionTwoEyes
9th of May 2009 (Sat), 18:38
PS sorry if this is in the wrong spot... i couldnt find a proper section?

tonydee
11th of May 2009 (Mon), 06:35
I normally haunt other forums on POTN, so won't be one of the guy's posting great photos you're addressing, but a few things that I hope might be suitable off the top of my head. Ignore anything you think's silly :-). Cheers, Tony

for DOF:
- put three or four things in a line, and try to get all of each one in turn sharply in focus while the others are OOF... distances between them, sizes depend on your focal length - not sure which kit lens you've got... will be easier zoomed in as far as you can... see online depth-of-field calculator at http://dofmaster.com/dofjs.html
- get as close as possible to a foreground object, such that the front edge is out of focus and everything behind through infinity is in focus... easy to set up example: a book on a table, where half the page is focused and you can see all the room behind... read about "hyperfocal distance" and use the calculator above to evaluate it

for shutter:
- results vary with speeds, focal length, distance, angles etc. so don't take numbers too seriously: they're not that generally applicable for your later work, just ballpark...
- play with a drop of water striking a body of water, ripples etc.
- get some flowing water and see how slow a shutter you need to get a smooth blur, how fast you need to freeze it solid, and what looks most like normal human perception
- try to shoot passing cars, panning with the car so the car is sharp but the background blurred (or similarly for birds)
- shoot the night sky with your camera on a tripod... use a long shutter speed (check "B"ulb mode) to try to get star trails...

for exposure:
- try some night time shots with lights - not just points of light at a distance, but lights close enough to occupy pixel area... and try to get some shadow detail without blown highlights being obnoxious... shoot RAW so you can easily correct colour casts using white balance during post-processing...
- shoot something with black and white areas in harsh sunlight and various levels of shade, and see if you can get some sharp texture in both parts of the object... don't expect too much in the harsh sunlight...
- take some pictures of the moon during the day... use Manual mode and underexpose until the sky is black and the moon is nicely exposed (works best if your kit lens zooms in a bit... if it's the whatever-to-55mm or thereabouts, won't get much moon)

Tiberius
11th of May 2009 (Mon), 08:01
Have a look at the photography tutorials in the link in my signature. Specifically, look at the "Using P, A, S and M Modes" tutorial and the "Common Exposure Settings" tutorial.