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View Full Version : I wear glasses, please help


Einar
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 22:35
I have a cannon 20D. Have had it for about 3 months. It's my first step into digital SLR'S. I shoot mainly sports venues. My question is, how do you shoot with glasses in the manual mode? With my glasses, I can't really see the bottom of the view finder to rean the data. Too much light coming in between my glasses and my eye. Last week end, I took off my glasses and shot the rest of the day w/o glasses. Does anyone else have this problem? I was amazed when I looked through the view finder w/o glasses, all of the data avialable, (speed, Aperture, etc.)

tim
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 22:43
Wear contacts (I do), or use the diopter adjustment of the viewfinder.

fireman_gaz
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 22:54
use the diopter adjustment thingy in the veiwfinder.

Page 38 of the manual

Einar
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 22:55
I can adjust the diopter, almost enough to see a clear image, but that's not important. As long as I can read the Data, I'm OK. I trust the camara to focus clearly.

Einar
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 23:01
I guess my question really is, does any one shoot with , or while wearing glasses? And if so, how do you read the settings on the bottom of the view finder? Too much light gets in between my glasses and my eyebrow, and and can't see the bottom scale.

tim
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 23:02
You can buy stronger viewing thingies if the diopter's not strong enough for you, but like I said, contact lenses are easier.

Are you saying you don't care if you can't see the image so long as you can see the data? How would you frame the image?

robertwgross
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 23:05
I have the camera's diopter adjusted to work with my left eye, uncorrected. Normally when I am outdoors in the daylight, I am wearing prescription sunglasses until I spot my subject. I get the camera lined up halfway, and then I push the sunglasses up onto my forehead. View, check the viewfinder display sometimes, and then shoot. I review the captured image on the rear screen, and then replace the sunglasses back onto my eyes and look for the subject again.

---Bob Gross---

Mildot
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 23:06
I bought the EP-EX15 eyepiece extender for mine and it works great.

tim
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 23:08
I tried the eyepiece extender a couple of days ago, but decided against buying it. The image was just as bright with it, but it was about half the size, which would make manual focus very difficult.

Einar
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 23:38
I have the Extender (EX-15), but the problem is the light that gets in between my glasses and my eyebrow. I makes viewing the bottom of the view finder difficult. Obviously, I can take off my glasses and operate the camara just fine. I was just wondering if anyone else has this problem.

Bob, I understand about your sunglasses, but when shooting sporting events, I find that you must be ready to shoot, readjust and reshoot in very short time frames. Seems that the only solution is to shoot w/o glasses on, at least in the manual modes.

Moses
2nd of May 2005 (Mon), 23:51
I guess my question really is, does any one shoot with , or while wearing glasses? And if so, how do you read the settings on the bottom of the view finder? Too much light gets in between my glasses and my eyebrow, and and can't see the bottom scale.Is there information to read in the view finder? :o

:)

I guess I'll have to take my glasses off to look! ;)

deedas
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 02:53
I have that problem. I can't see the bottom of the view finder at all. In fact, I have such bad eye sight that I don't think I even see the whole picture. Since I'm a newbie, I usually just do trial and error instead of relying on the view finder. :oops: But I do try to use it when I have contacts on.

malcolmx
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 03:04
i have bad eyes and i wear glasses all the time i have always been able to see the data i have adjusted the view finder to suit my vision i do not wear vari or bifocals try a larger rubber eye piece

lancea
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 04:23
Yes - I have the same problem. I've worn glasses for - well let's just say "quite a while" and have always kept them on. The 20D is not too bad compared with some cameras I've had. Quite simply I just put up with not being able to see information around the sides without moving my eye a bit. It's a case of either looking at the focusing screen or looking at the settings. I find it far more inconvenient if I take my glasses off (although I sometimes have to so I can read the top LCD display).

dphotomania
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 07:16
I have a cannon 20D. Have had it for about 3 months. It's my first step into digital SLR'S. I shoot mainly sports venues. My question is, how do you shoot with glasses in the manual mode? With my glasses, I can't really see the bottom of the view finder to rean the data. Too much light coming in between my glasses and my eye. Last week end, I took off my glasses and shot the rest of the day w/o glasses. Does anyone else have this problem? I was amazed when I looked through the view finder w/o glasses, all of the data avialable, (speed, Aperture, etc.)

Einar, didnt anyone tell you that if you wear glasses, one of the accessary for owning a DSLR is contact? I found out the first week when I got my 20D. Now I stop wearing glasses totally. Contact is a pain in my butt, but nothing will stop me from seeing better thorough the view finder now!! :p :p

Good luck and maybe give contact a try.

Az2Africa
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 07:44
This may sound silly compared to the other answers, but I had the same problem and the best I could do was to buy the extender and a hat.I hate wearing hats, but the shade from the brim cuts the light down enough to let me see the data considerably better.Give it a try if you haven't already.

robertwgross
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 10:50
If you wear a hat while shooting, it is not uncommon to get the Err 05 warning.

That means that the built-in flash tried to pop up, and it hit the brim of your hat, so the error warning was posted.

---Bob Gross---

montreal
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 11:00
That means that the built-in flash tried to pop up, and it hit the brim of your hat, so the error warning was posted.

Ehehe :lol: That's funny!

Einar
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 11:19
Glad to see that I'm not alone here. I do wear a hat, never got the err-05, but the flip up has nearly knocked off my hat. I can adjust with glasses, but when I shot with out them, what a difference. It makes manual so much easier being able to see the adjustments in the view finder while adjusting, not having to take my eye off of my target. Oh well, I guess you can't have everything...

Toogy
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 12:16
Hmm... I wear glasses and don't have any problems at all? I can see the information in the viewfinder fine.

Mark Kemp
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 12:19
I find i can cope by moving my eye a little.

I don't get much light in around the eye, but I wear small rimless glasses that fit quite close so maybe that helps

robertwgross
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 20:52
Mark, you need to get white glasses with a red ring.

---Bob Gross---

johnnybfan
3rd of May 2005 (Tue), 22:16
I have worn glasses for most of my life (got them when I was 5 - am now 54). I shot for the first couple of days and bought the EX-15 extender. It works great for me except that it doesn't want to stay on. I even bought a second non-canon eyepiece & that doesn't like to stay on either. Anyway, I don't have any problems with light or reading the info displayed. Used to have contacts - great for sports and such - but cannot wear them anymore so I'm glad I don't have problems like you are having.

Mark Kemp
4th of May 2005 (Wed), 00:27
Mark, you need to get white glasses with a red ring.

---Bob Gross---


I would but my eyeballs are Pentax K mount

Perfect_10
4th of May 2005 (Wed), 10:43
I have the Extender (EX-15), but the problem is the light that gets in between my glasses and my eyebrow. ... .
I have the EX-15 and love it ..
I guess you need to grow your eyebrows a bit bushier to block out the light .. :lol:

slin100
4th of May 2005 (Wed), 11:30
I took the eyepiece off of my 10D, as seen below. I found that it was getting in the way.
http://img88.echo.cx/img88/4742/img1325w2ek.jpg

mmahoney
10th of February 2007 (Sat), 20:04
For indoor sports "M" mode is set at the beginning and forgotten about as the light is consistent throughout the event .. I'm usually wide open and adjust the ISO to give enough shutter speed to freeze the action, usually 1/400 to 1/500.

Outdoor sports in changing light are usually shot in "A" mode, and again after the aperture is set (usually wide open) it is just forgotten about as the camera then fixes the shutter speed .. after one or two shots you will know if the light supports the shutter speed required for the sport, if not adjust the ISO to obtain the required shutter speed.

This is probably the method used by the majority of sports shooters, and the majority of them never look at their viewfinder information .. because they already know what it is .. how do you set your camera for sports ??
Mike

Glenn NK
10th of February 2007 (Sat), 21:09
I generally leave my glasses on, but the frames are of that flexible "plastic steel" stuff, and they flex enough to allow me to see everything without permanently bending out of shape. Marvellous invention - also protects against rambunctious grand-daughters.;)

Hellashot
10th of February 2007 (Sat), 22:14
Wear contacts (I do), or use the diopter adjustment of the viewfinder.

If you wear contacts or glasses you need to use the diopter adjustment in order to see things in focus. Only someone with 20/20 vision without wearing corrective lenses can see things in the viewfinder at 0 adjustment.

donlavange
10th of February 2007 (Sat), 22:27
I wear varifocals and they are a pain in general. In other words, I have age related vision problems both near and far.

If I take my glasses off and adjust the diopter I cannot see other information on the top and back menus. The best solution I have found is listed in an above post. I look through the viewfinder adjusted for my eyes and the pull the glasses from my forehead quickly down to read other data.

Getting old sucks . . . big time!

Mark_Cohran
10th of February 2007 (Sat), 23:22
I wear progressing lenses and don't have any issues seeing the viewfinder data. But then, I've worn glasses nearly all my life and have been using Canon cameras for a good percentage - maybe I'm just used to the processing of framing then tilting my head to see the data.

Mark

donlavange
11th of February 2007 (Sun), 09:14
I wear progressing lenses and don't have any issues seeing the viewfinder data. But then, I've worn glasses nearly all my life and have been using Canon cameras for a good percentage - maybe I'm just used to the processing of framing then tilting my head to see the data.

Mark

Maybe an altenate for those of us with bifocus glasses is another pair specifically devoted to shooting. Perhaps a smaller lense with less chance of light leaking by and geared to a smaller movement of the head to make the focus switch.

I think that maybe a choice! I think I will visit Lenscrafters today with one of my cameras and see what they suggest. Glad I have read thsi thread! By the way. . .getting old still sucks!

Rachael Scotter
11th of February 2007 (Sun), 10:34
Reverse problem here. :) With my contacts the data is one of the few things I can actually see in the viewfinder. :)
My main problem is shifting the blind spot I have in the centre of my vision (myopic macular degeneration) around in time to frame (due to the rest of my vision lacking contrast), focus (wish I had centre weighted focusing for my eyes still :) ) and not actually miss the shots in the process. My old camera had an evf which I was able to make brighter which helped but screwed with the judging of exposures. My 400D is taking a lot of getting used to !

As an aside, do any of you contacts lens wearers suffer from dry (shooting) eye ? I have noticed that since I stuck my eye to the viewfinder (not literally you understand :) ) I am getting a dry shooting eye enough to really hurt sometimes - my eye care specialist has recommended artificial tears and goop to put in at night. If I could see at all out of the other eye I'd switch eyes now and then but I can't so, not an option. It's the lack of blinking that does it I'm sure - my lenses are the gas perm lid attachment type (and very heavy as I am pathologically myopic) that take a little time to settle down and focus after a blink - so I try not to blink whilst framing fast disappearing shots.

Just Be
11th of February 2007 (Sun), 11:47
Hmm... I wear glasses and don't have any problems at all? I can see the information in the viewfinder fine.

I wear glasses full time. I can see everything OK but not as nice as not wearing them. I dont' feel the need to switch to contacts.

Jon
11th of February 2007 (Sun), 12:16
If you wear contacts or glasses you need to use the diopter adjustment in order to see things in focus. Only someone with 20/20 vision without wearing corrective lenses can see things in the viewfinder at 0 adjustment.
Aside from this is a 2005 thread . . .
If your contacts or glasses correct your vision to 20/20 the diopter adjustment can be centered, assuming you don't also have presbyopia, in which case you need to adjust the diopter setting to roughly correspond to your reading glass settings (assuming no bifocals).

liza
11th of February 2007 (Sun), 12:28
If you wear a hat while shooting, it is not uncommon to get the Err 05 warning.

That means that the built-in flash tried to pop up, and it hit the brim of your hat, so the error warning was posted.

---Bob Gross---

My flash never pops up. Hmmm... Maybe something is wrong with my camera. ;)

I wear varifocals and they are a pain in general. In other words, I have age related vision problems both near and far.

Getting old sucks . . . big time!

I feel your pain. Really. My alternative to the bifocal issue is something I first tried yesterday, called "monovision." The prescription for my contact lenses is such that one eye is used for close vision (my right eye) and the other for distance. It's a bit odd, but I like the fact that I no longer have to wear magnifiers to read printed material.

donlavange
11th of February 2007 (Sun), 12:37
My flash never pops up. Hmmm... Maybe something is wrong with my camera. ;)



I feel your pain. Really. My alternative to the bifocal issue is something I first tried yesterday, called "monovision." The prescription for my contact lenses is such that one eye is used for close vision (my right eye) and the other for distance. It's a bit odd, but I like the fact that I no longer have to wear magnifiers to read printed material.

Yes! I have heard that is A solution to the problem. While I know that the brain adjusts to vision correction devices quickly, I have never had contacts and I have never talked with anyone who used the the "monovision" approach.

I would love to hear what you think after a few weeks!

liza
11th of February 2007 (Sun), 21:40
I can already tell you I'm going to continue with the monovision. It's so wonderful not having to wear magnifiers anymore. That was a real pain in the rear.

Bob_A
11th of February 2007 (Sun), 21:51
I wear progressing lenses and don't have any issues seeing the viewfinder data. But then, I've worn glasses nearly all my life and have been using Canon cameras for a good percentage - maybe I'm just used to the processing of framing then tilting my head to see the data.

Mark

I also have progressives and don't have a problem using my camera while wearing them, other than them getting dirty, which is a bit annoying. I purchased the strongest dioptric correction lens that Canon has for the 20D, and even using it plus maximum correction on the viewfinder ... it still wasn't enough, so until I get my eyes lasered (I hate contacts), I'm stuck with my glasses.

jwan148
12th of April 2007 (Thu), 14:18
I wear glasses but I don't have any problems seeing the data. The only problem I get is the eyecup rubber rubbing against my glasses and after a while I can see the smuges on the lens...

I have the eyecup extender, it helps with reading the data but it makes the already small viewfinder alot smaller!

strmrdr
12th of April 2007 (Thu), 14:24
had the same problem back in the stone age... have always had lousy eyesight,,,,
fix?
block the light buy some clip on side safety shields and paint them flat black.

strmrdr
12th of April 2007 (Thu), 14:25
linkage... http://www.prosafetyequipment.com/p/37/eyeglass-side-shields.aspx

inthedeck
12th of April 2007 (Thu), 14:53
I wear glasses as well, and can usually see things correctly. It's just that I have transition lenses on my glasses, so when the UV light is strong, they tint. This makes it a lot harder to work with polarizers, etc, because what I think is correct, isn't...so, I have to chimp the histogram more often.

Then, I just take the darned things off, and continue with what I was doing...and things seem to brighten up more in the VF.

Whatta process I tell ya...whatta pain.

Jaime
12th of April 2007 (Thu), 15:00
My lenses are bifocal and I have no such problems.

gasrocks
12th of April 2007 (Thu), 15:07
I shoot wearing glasses all the time with no problem. I did take off the little "rubber" protective thing around the viewfinder which helps me get closer = see the whole finder better and I have not had it scratch my glasses yet. Of course, I have glass lenses not plastic ones just for this reason.

Az2Africa
12th of April 2007 (Thu), 21:11
I do the same as Bob Gross. I set the diopter for one eye without glasses.