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acs=e36
8th of July 2009 (Wed), 15:48
So a cannon 40D fell out of the sky and im so overwhelmed with all its functions and ability to take amazing pictures but i just dont know where to start. i was never really into photography so what makes a good picture is all quite new to me. i have got an idea of how to use this thing but its still limited at this point. can somone help me where to start when taking pics in M mode. i would really like to put this thing to some good use rather than just a fancy point and shoot!
what do i adjust first? what settings are best in what conditions? how do i fine tune it? help?! thanks in advance

Bansheercr
8th of July 2009 (Wed), 15:52
Best advice is read the manual several times and learn where and how the buttons are and used.

gjl711
8th of July 2009 (Wed), 15:56
I have to disagree with the reading the manual to learn a DSLR. The manual is a great tool to show you the hows but not the whens and whys. I have found that this simple website is much better in introducing the features and providing a simple explination of what to use and when. Once you get a handle on the the manual come into play to provide the detailed background on how to fully utilize a feature.

Check out this web site.
http://web.canon.jp/imaging/enjoydslr/index.html

windpig
8th of July 2009 (Wed), 16:02
what is your photographic background?

acs=e36
8th of July 2009 (Wed), 17:49
what is your photographic background?
im pretty newb to all this. im comming straight from a point and shoot and im currently putting this to waste since im not using it to its full potential. i did however take a photography class ages ago using a nikon film SLR but its all forgotten now. i been playing with this allot and its slowly coming back but its still just basic knowledge.

Photon Phil
8th of July 2009 (Wed), 17:54
So you have knowledge of the triangle of Shutter Speed, aperture and ISO?

acs=e36
9th of July 2009 (Thu), 17:51
thats the part that actually frustrates me the most
i just dont know which one to mess with first and how to use these to get the most of the picture. sure i can tinker them so the pic turns out but i dont think im doing this properly

kekoa
9th of July 2009 (Thu), 17:55
I'm pretty new too. first, what lens are you using?

i would go outside, set the iso to about 200, put the camera in av mode and start playing with the aperature shooting different things. I still us av mode the most. I'm not yet comfortable going to full M. that is my goal this year though along with collecting a few L lenses. :)

acs=e36
9th of July 2009 (Thu), 18:20
mines a 17-85mm 1:4-5.6 i believe this is the standard one
first of all from what i understand for ISO, 100 is best for SUNNY days and 400 for indoors? when would i use the rest going to 1600?
but regardless im still confused about what to dial first in terms of Shutter Speed, aperture and ISO

kekoa
9th of July 2009 (Thu), 18:37
mines a 17-85mm 1:4-5.6 i believe this is the standard one
first of all from what i understand for ISO, 100 is best for SUNNY days and 400 for indoors? when would i use the rest going to 1600?
but regardless im still confused about what to dial first in terms of Shutter Speed, aperture and ISO


I'm not an ISO expert, but your assumptions above are wrong. My iso can range from 100-400 on sunny days. Inside, the highest i've goon is 1600, but my 5dmk II can go even higher without too much noise. IMO, I would try AV first so you can control the aperature and the shutter speed sets accordingly. Just play with different aperatures and you will see the DOF's changing. See what works best for different subject.

Again, i'm new too so maybe some experts can guid you better. The above is just what i did when starting.

ScootersDaddy
9th of July 2009 (Thu), 18:43
I'm very new to DSLRs too. Two books that were a huge help to me were Scott Kelby's Digital Photography books and also Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson. Read those books, read the forums for a couple of months and take a few thousand pictures and you'll be in good shape before you know it.

SOK
9th of July 2009 (Thu), 18:48
Start here: Ben's Newbie Guide (http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=414088)

I'm also a fan of the way this site (http://www.uscoles.com/fstop.htm) explains things.

neilwood32
15th of July 2009 (Wed), 07:48
Bens guide is a very good one.

Another good place to learn is http://digital-photography-school.com/

-Swo0p
16th of July 2009 (Thu), 06:46
As a fellow Newb I'll give my 2 cents...

I've been messing with Shutter speeds and Fstops the most, just trying everything out to see what works best in which situation.

These are modes Tv and Av.

If you select a shutter speed (ISO whatever) the camera will adjust the aperture (F stop) automatically for you, depending on whats needed.

If its dark, you want a low F stop (the higher the Fstop - the smaller the aperture) and the camera will give you a faster shutter speed to make up for lots of light being let in.
If you want one of those highway shots with blurred car lights, obviously then **** with the ISO.
If you want to shoot a water drop hitting the water... make the ISO very high or open the aprture as far as you can (low fstop).

if im wrong pls correct me :)


also, by messing with the f-stop you can decide how much blur in your background you want. i think the higher the fstop the more blur you can create. for a landscape picture where you want detail, use a low fstop number.

SOK
16th of July 2009 (Thu), 16:47
by messing with the f-stop you can decide how much blur in your background you want. i think the higher the fstop the more blur you can create. for a landscape picture where you want detail, use a low fstop number.

If you're talking about the actual F-stop number then you have this back to front.
if im wrong pls correct me :)

Check out the link to Ben's Newbie Guide I posted in post #12 above...it's all covered in there.

vipergts831
16th of July 2009 (Thu), 16:52
+1 Those two books were a huge help to me also back in January when i first joined the DSLR world. I highly recommend them!!!


I'm very new to DSLRs too. Two books that were a huge help to me were Scott Kelby's Digital Photography books and also Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson. Read those books, read the forums for a couple of months and take a few thousand pictures and you'll be in good shape before you know it.

guyzer09
13th of September 2009 (Sun), 23:31
I am not in any way advanced either but i just started shooting in Manual. I started with all the "idiot" modes, planning out all my scenes according to what the icon said. This will help you understand what does what if you pay close enough attention to the apeture and shutter value. If you google ISO there are numerous threds and pages that will help clearify what everything means and how everything is put together to capture the picture the way you want it to look. Once i started to understand apeture and shutter values i moved on to shooting in AV mode. It was easier to understand then TV mode at the time. Try not to get too excited with the shots you get in this mode cuz i was shooting with an ef 50mm f/1.8 and i thought that because i was able to acheive the backround blur i was hot stuff!! I was totally wrong!! it was cool at first but then i was stuck and that was all my pictures consisted of, blurry backrounds! once i understood that the bigger the apeture value the more depth of field i would get my pictures started to come more to life. I moved on to TV mode which i think was the hardest mode to understand and shoot for a person comming from no knoledge. I spent alot of time in this mode messing around with the shutter speeds and trying to tie in the relations from the shutter speed and the ISO. I played around with the shutter speed and fast moving objects to find out at what speeds makes what effect. Like with water flowing at fast shutter speeds it will freeze the water and you will get a clear image of the water droplets but with a slow shutter speed the water will appear almost like a fog cuz the shutter stays open as the water passes. This way of learning helped me understand and apply not only the scene situations but how to control my apeture and shutter along with applying what ISO to shoot in. I would say just take it one step at a time and dont try to overwhelm youself with so much info that you start to confuse yourelf.Dont worry about gear because then you will just become a gear head and will spend all your time researching about gear instead of getting better at your photography skills. I fell into that route and am now just starting to get back out of it. As you can see in my sig i started out with the dino D30 which is a 3.3mp dslr but the way it was layed out to be almost identical to my cannon elan film camera helped me understand how to navigate thru the camera to get what i want. Take your time and dont worry about when your photos will turn out exactly the way you pictured it but more of how are your pictures gonna turn out the way you want. Have fun learn and no matter how good you get everyones art is different. I hope this helps.

DigitalBoy
19th of September 2009 (Sat), 19:56
A good book for learning all the functions of your camera would be here.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002MPPRA4/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_2?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=1598635107&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=03QMVT6RWZ0DYD9D97N1

This book is way more informative than the book that came with the camera.

Conaway 55
24th of September 2009 (Thu), 14:44
Im a newb myself (just registered for this forum)... these websites are GREAT! I spent two days on the first one posted! Just wanted to say a quick thank you for sharing and keep them coming :) Have fun!