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StellaBean
28th of July 2009 (Tue), 08:31
I've been using the Crumpler 7mdh since I got my gear and I hate to say, I'm not loving it.

I've had my eye on the backpacks since the day I bought my gear but what puts me off is the idea of having my stuff behind me, vulnerable to nimble fingered ne'er do wells.

I love the organization of the Tamrac backpacks, but I worry about how easy they are to get into. I don't think I mind having to take MY time to get into the bag (or look at something like the flipside), but my question is: how easy or hard are these bags to get into when you "lock" them up and throw them on your back?

note: I don't have any place local to go touch and feel camera bags. :(

janvm
28th of July 2009 (Tue), 08:55
I bought a Lowepro flipside 400 a month ago for a trip to france. I found it to be very comfortable, even for walks up to 5 hours in mountanous terrain. Acces to the photography compartiment is definatly secure and easy to access using the flipside system. However, the extra compartiment you can use to store some food or a wallet/cellphone remains easily accesible...

DisrupTer911
28th of July 2009 (Tue), 08:58
the Crumpler backpacks don't allow access unless you remove it. the zippers are all on the backside of the pack and not out in the open.

Wilt
28th of July 2009 (Tue), 10:50
A razor blade, for making a quick and easy incision in a bag so that the contents can be extracted, needs to be considered in the choice of a theft proof bag.

StellaBean
28th of July 2009 (Tue), 12:04
A razor blade, for making a quick and easy incision in a bag so that the contents can be extracted, needs to be considered in the choice of a theft proof bag.

jeez, I never considered that. would I look stupid wearing my backpack on the front of me? :rolleyes:

advaitin
28th of July 2009 (Tue), 12:20
First of all, read this blog:

http://practicaltravelgear.blogspot.com/2008/07/daysafe-200-theft-proof-laptop-daypack.html

I used one of these packs for a month in Europe this spring, mostly in Italy. For travel from station to hotel, train travel between cities, I carried a Canon 5DM2, 15mm, 16-35, 24-105 IS, 70-200 f4 IS, one flash, 2 Canon teleconverters, one spare hard drive and a laptop and a monopod on one side pocket and tripod (gitzo traveller) on the other. Total weight 45 pounds.

I was accidentally knocked off my feet on an up escalator and fell on the pack. Everything was so well padded that not one item suffered any damage--my legs got cut up and I had some other scrapes, but the pack which kept all the equipment safe also kept me from getting much more damage.

Once in the hotel, in Rome, for instance, I locked everything that I wasn't using on day trips in the removable insert to something solid in the hotel room (radiator pipe) and carried a couple of lenses in the bag, which was much lighter.

I recommend this bag very highly.

canonnoob
28th of July 2009 (Tue), 12:28
expedition 7x.. it is what I have and i love it. i have my:
1dmkIIn with sigma 70-200 2.8 attached
40d
430 ex
vivitar flash
16-35 2.8 II
50 1.8
85 1.8
18-55
box of cybersyncs
16-35 hood and the tripod collar for the 70-200

all put in the actual pack.

Then in some of the sleeves I have my filters and cleaning supplies as well as instruction manuals. In the front I carry my buiness cards and memory cards as well as any cables. It also has a nice large slot for my laptop (15.4" gateway).

Nice pack.. Its easy to get into and out of. i just put the bag down on the ground unzip and go..

IF you want me to take a shot of it with everything in it let me know. Last spring i put 27lbs of camera gear in it and took it with me to san antonio.. It was comfortable with the straps and it has pads near your waist.. overall a great backpack.

Wilt
28th of July 2009 (Tue), 14:22
jeez, I never considered that. would I look stupid wearing my backpack on the front of me? :rolleyes:

I used to work with a native of Italy who was a recent expat working in the US. It was he who told me about the methods of theft on the streets of Italy in high tourism cities. Razor blades were one such method of removing wallets from bags. (it was truly amazing to learn of the removal of wheels and tires from rental cars at a stop light, too!)

tvphotog
28th of July 2009 (Tue), 16:08
It would have to be a boxcutter and a big one at that to cut through the canvas and the storage pockets on the rear panel of most backpacks. Also, the tripod is generally there, blocking access to the interior. I'd worry more about comfort.
Check the Think Tank Rotation 360, which is my favorite travel pack. I love the Tamrac Expedition series, but I think the Rotation 360 has more options. Same size as the Expedition 5X.