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snowshine
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 02:19
Hello,
Mine EOS 40D kit lens 17-85 IS lens.

I find individuals in photos are not sharp even though I used a tripod and remotely clicking to avoid any camera shake. I have tried different apertures [Taken the photos in Av mode]

I wonder if I should make the IS [Image Stabilizer] redendant[inactive] when using a tripod and remote clicking to obtain sharpness of the subjects. or the kit lens is hopelessly useless?

Thank you for your expert opinion.
Regards

FlyingPhotog
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 02:21
Any time you actually have the option to use a tripod and a cable release (or wireless release) then by all means do so.

The 35mm format may have been developed so photographers didn't have to drag around heavy tripods and such but if you have one and the occassion allows for its use, then use it! ;)

Picture North Carolina
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 06:59
Welcome to POTN!

In answer to your post subject title, yes, Canon recommends you turn off IS when using a tripod.



I find individuals in photos are not sharp even though I used a tripod and remotely clicking to avoid any camera shake. I have tried different apertures [Taken the photos in Av mode]

I wonder if I should make the IS [Image Stabilizer] redendant[inactive] when using a tripod and remote clicking to obtain sharpness of the subjects. or the kit lens is hopelessly useless?

Thank you for your expert opinion.
Regards

I apologize, but don't understand your full question 100%. However, if your camera is tripod mounted and you're using a remote trigger and your subjects are blurred, it's most likely your problem is your subject is moving. IS on or off won't help that. What shutter speeds are being used? What kind of environment / light are you shooting in? Are you outdoors in bright light on a tripod and still getting blurred people? Post a pic with exif intact. Also post a 100% crop of a part of a blurred person.

snowshine
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 08:58
Hello CannedHeat,

You are correct the subject was not still especially when my shutter speed was less than 1\8sec in the photo I was referring to earlier.

But then

This photo for one example: ISO 160 f/5.6 shutter 1.3sec Tripod mounted camera. Photo taken before Sunrise. IS on the lens was not turned off.

Regards

Picture North Carolina
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 09:42
What is your concern about the photo? First, it's hard to tell if this is a full image crop posted at such a small size. Second, 5.6 can be a shallow DOF which might contribute, not knowing what the focal point is.

However, I see enough detail in the background tree that has branches against the sky that to me, it looks like if the image were sharpened it might be ok.

crn3371
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 11:53
With the 17-85 I would definitely turn off IS while on a tripod. As far as your subjects being not as sharp as you would like a lot depends on shutter speed. If you are using a tripod with mirror lock-up that usually indicates a slower shutter speed. Slow shutter speeds and movement don't go well together.

RDKirk
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 12:42
Hello,
Mine EOS 40D kit lens 17-85 IS lens.

I find individuals in photos are not sharp even though I used a tripod and remotely clicking to avoid any camera shake. I have tried different apertures [Taken the photos in Av mode]

I wonder if I should make the IS [Image Stabilizer] redendant[inactive] when using a tripod and remote clicking to obtain sharpness of the subjects. or the kit lens is hopelessly useless?

Thank you for your expert opinion.
Regards

The original Type I IS needed to be turned off when on a tripod. The Type II and later IS systems can detect being on a steady tripod and cut their function. You don't have to turn it off with the later types of IS and the instructions no longer direct it.

But even with a tripod, your system may not be stable enough for your requirements. Run more tests on the tripod using higher shutter speeds to see if it's still movement that's causing your problem.

Be sure, too, to watch your depth of field. In the linked photo, if you were expecting the background to be sharp, it looks like you were suffering depth of field problems.

snowshine
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 15:00
Thank you very much.
I presume my 17-85 IS kit lens should be Type II because I bought that with the 40D at the end of 2008. I will try few photos improving my shutterspeeds & depth of field and post back if still have any concerns

I can understand what was causing the problemfrom your posts.

Regards

WaltA
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 17:02
What may be confusing to some is that Canon (and some retailers and reviewers) state in the specs for any lens that you should turn IS off when you mount the camera on a tripod. Even the newest lens which apparantly can detect a tripod. The reason they're telling you to turn IS off is to save on your battery.

Nothing to do with the IS messing up your shot.

tonylong
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 17:14
Snowshine,

To really understand what your setup is capable of, run some tests in good light. Use Mirror Lockup (your manual will explain how to use it) and either a cable release or the self timer and focus on a stationary subject with a good area of contrast and detail that fills the circle at the center of the viewfinder. For this test it would also be helpful if there is items in the background and foreground as well. Take a series of shots at varying apertures and focal lengths (you can use f/8 as a "reference" aperture setting because it is likely to be one of the overall sharpest settings).

Compare the results at different viewing sizes up to 100% and you should get an idea of 1) How sharp you can expect your setup to get, 2) How different apertures and focal lengths can affect sharpness and 3) How different apertures comvined with focal lengths can affect the depth of field, that is, the area in front of and behind your subject that is in acceptable focus.

Dick Emery
31st of December 2009 (Thu), 17:54
It just needs a little sharpening that's all. I am not sure if it was meant to have the blue cast to it either. You can set auto white balance in a paint program to fix that if needed. If you set your profile to allow others to edit and post your photo I can upload a couple of examples for you to check out or alternatively I can email them if you like.

snowshine
1st of January 2010 (Fri), 07:12
Done it-Changed the profile to allow others to edit
Regards