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canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 07:15
From a discussion in another thread, I was wondering if a Netbook with Windows 7 Lite with 64 bit will open and run EOS utility, and connect to a MkIII and be recognized? Anyone done it? I understand that Canon does not support 64 bit, or make drivers for it.

WaltA
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 09:25
Haven't done it but I wanted to add that the Canon Software devlopment Kit (even latest version) doesn't support 64 bit Windows yet so I suspect all the utilities (like EOS Utilities) will be the same.

krb
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 09:27
I never shoot in tethered mode but there's been once or twice when I thought it would be a cool thing to do with the netbook. But on my netbook I cannot install any of the EOS utilities because of the screen resolution. :(

canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 09:33
Never thought of screen resolution. Didn't know it was a problem or requirement.

This kind of thing is not supposed to happen in this century. It's like tool making abilities have increased, yet the designers and engineers are still making the same old stupid mistakes. Gas pedals that run you over the cliff, brakes that don't work, new computers that can't connect to new cameras. Why do we bother?

krb
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 09:42
Hmmm.....

You realize that you're saying engineers are supposed to have designed products that protect humans from their own errors, but the engineers are human too so how does that work?

Photo software is designed for workstations and netbooks are designed for checking email and browsing the web. You'll also find yourself limited if you try to run the latest and greatest first person shooter video game on there. The only person who made 'the same old mistake' in this case is the consumer who didn't do enough research.

There are ways around the screen resolution issue, such as having a higher resolution external monitor attached while running the install, if that's an option on your netbook. There are also other software packages available that do not require a certain minimum screen resolution. I cannot install PS Elements or the EOS utilties but stuff like Picasa and IRFanView run just fine. I think there are one or two options for tethered shooting that don't have a screen resolution requirement but they are not free and I'm not interested in paying the admittedly small price for software I would so rarely ever use.

Some newer netbooks also have a higher resolution screen than my "1st generation" model so it may not be an issue for you at all.

canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 09:49
I happen to be one of those guys that does his research. I don't have a netbook, just doing research. If I did have one, I wouldn't be in here asking stupid questions, I'd already know the answers.

Screen resolution is a moot point, being as these netbooks all have 64 bit encription installed. Although, the images on the screen look a lot sharper and finer than even my desktop monitor, just smaller. You can get a 13" monitor to show 800x600 and you can also set a 19" monitor to show 800x600. I imagine you can do the same with the newer Netbooks.

NewphotoMan
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 09:53
I love using it on my mac and I got this program for my ipod touch when I can control the camera wireless from anywhen in my house as long as the camera is hooked to the network through thw computer like I had the camera hooked up outside with a long mini usb and I had my laptop on the dinning room table and I sat in the living room with the ipod taking pictures outside

sportsshooter50
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 09:56
I successfully used EOS Utility and controlled my 5DMKII using Windows 7 Starter with my Asus 1005HA netbook. I had to change the resolution on the netbook.

canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 09:58
HAHA, that's Yankee ingenuity. The Netbook in question does have a 250Gig hard drive and a SDHD port, and USB port for a CF card reader, so it still might be worthwhile having it just to hold the images should I ever fill all my cards, which has happened. :)

canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 09:59
I successfully used EOS Utility and controlled my 5DMKII using Windows 7 Starter with my Asus 1005HA netbook. I had to change the resolution on the netbook.

Wonderful to know. There was no problem with a driver for the USB Port then? Or did you have the 32 bit version? I understand there is a 32 bit version you can install, but it's another $75.

krb
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 10:02
Screen resolution is a moot point, being as these netbooks all have 64 bit encription installed. You completely lost me with this one. I can't think of anything "64-bit" that would have anything whatsoever to do with screen resolution, and certainly not any encryption algorithms that may be installed.

krb
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 10:04
HAHA, that's Yankee ingenuity. The Netbook in question does have a 250Gig hard drive and a SDHD port, and USB port for a CF card reader, so it still might be worthwhile having it just to hold the images should I ever fill all my cards, which has happened. :)
This is exactly what I use mine for. Big hard drive to store images and the screen is great for viewing them.

canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 10:04
It makes it a moot point, because Canon does not make a 64 bit driver to connect the camera to a USB port. Screen resolution therefore means nothing.

sportsshooter50
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 10:06
Nope. I found a little trick to enable the higher resolution. I don't have the netbook any more. After using it for a while, I returned it. It was a very nice computer, but overall was pretty slow. But I did have EOS Utility and DPP running on it.

canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 10:14
This is exactly what I use mine for. Big hard drive to store images and the screen is great for viewing them.
Since I shoot birds most of the time, I had thought to also install some bird calls on it and use it to bring them in. I think it might also work very well as an e-book reader. Small and light enough to sit on my belly while I lay in bed and read. The screen resolution on the one I saw was phenominal. Ya never know, it might even play movies. :)

krb
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 10:25
Hhhmmmmmm.

Could put speakers near the perch and run a long wire back to a blind...

sportsshooter50
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 10:25
On my Asus, the screen was excellent. It uses LED back-lighting. And it does play DVD movies. I had bought an Asus external DVD burner for it. Or you could rip movies to the hard drive.

canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 10:50
Hhhmmmmmm.

Could put speakers near the perch and run a long wire back to a blind...
You would be surprised. While external speakers are possible, I checked for the plugin and sound card, and it is there, the birds can hear very low volume bird calls. There are little hand held bird callers that I can't hear, but they bring in the birds like a bee to honey. I already have a boat load of mp3 bird calls on my PC. :)

On my Asus, the screen was excellent. It uses LED back-lighting. And it does play DVD movies. I had bought an Asus external DVD burner for it. Or you could rip movies to the hard drive.
I have over 400 movies on DVD and the stuff to copy to a hard drive. ;)

Here are some statistics. It "has a 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 CPU, 1GB of RAM, a 250GB hard drive, and a 3 cell battery which should be good for 3-4 hours of run time.:

Here's a YouTube video of the Netbook (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYMBe3kWh94).

sportsshooter50
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 10:56
You would be surprised. While external speakers are possible, I checked for the plugin and sound card, and it is there, the birds can hear very low volume bird calls. There are little hand held bird callers that I can't hear, but they bring in the birds like a bee to honey. I already have a boat load of mp3 bird calls on my PC. :)


I have over 400 movies on DVD and the stuff to copy to a hard drive. ;)

Here are some statistics. It "has a 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 CPU, 1GB of RAM, a 250GB hard drive, and a 3 cell battery which should be good for 3-4 hours of run time.:

Here's a YouTube video of the Netbook (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYMBe3kWh94).

The one I had was from Costco and had a 6 cell battery rated at 10.5 hours. It got fantastic battery life.

jrm27
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 11:58
I connect my XSi to my hackintoshed Dell Mini 9 and control it with my iphone (DSLR Remote Pro). That has been awesome. I don't think I can install DPP becuase the screen size is too small.

canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 12:47
I will be getting one in the next few weeks. Even if it can't connect, I can use it for plenty of other things I do. Maybe I can install a 32 bit OS.

jrm27
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 13:54
Depending on what you get, and what you want to do, I wouldn't forsee that beign a problem. My hackintosh was runnign Leopard just fine and it is running snowleopard very well too. Good luck!

canonloader
9th of February 2010 (Tue), 16:38
Well, I know it has a 32 bit Windows 7 install for it, but it's $75, so the maybe means, maybe I can afford it. :)

Beachcomber Joe
10th of February 2010 (Wed), 14:00
I don't know about the version of Win 7 on the netbooks but my laptop, running Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit, has no problem controlling my T1i using EOS Utility.

k.lee
10th of February 2010 (Wed), 14:04
I always wanted to use a net-book or iphone as a way to add live-view onto cameras that don't have live-view. (such as my 5D) If only someone made an app on the iphone that does this.. it would be so much better for shooting macro and landscape shots.. No more bending down in awkward positions to get the right framing..

apersson850
10th of February 2010 (Wed), 14:26
With the native screen resolution (1024 * 600), software like EOS Utilities and DPP refuse to install on my little netbook. But you can fool these programs into installing anyway, since the netbook also supports a "fake" 1024 * 768 resolution, and that's enough. The netbook implements it by scrolling the screen up and down, but these programs don't care. Some even run in 1024 * 600, even if they require 1024 * 768 during the install.

RandyS
10th of February 2010 (Wed), 14:35
The version of Windows 7 included on the netbooks is the "starter" version. Think bloated crippleware. even if you were to stick with 32 bit, you'd want a fuller version.

I put #!crunchbang Linux on mine, but that wouldn't help much if you want to run the EOS Utilities. (but it runs in 90MB of ram :) )

canonloader
10th of February 2010 (Wed), 14:39
Randy, the guy at Walmart showed me a different Version of Win 7 at 32 bit, and there seemed to be other OS' for it to, so I will have to look into it a bit more and see what is available.

RandyS
10th of February 2010 (Wed), 15:55
Randy, the guy at Walmart showed me a different Version of Win 7 at 32 bit, and there seemed to be other OS' for it to, so I will have to look into it a bit more and see what is available.
Another thing you'll want to check is if you can add memory. Not all of them allow you access to it. From what I've seen, you can get either 1GB or 2GB. The 2GB netbooks seem to all come with Vista loaded.

I was able to replace the 1GB stick with 2GB in mine (HP-110).

Njv
10th of February 2010 (Wed), 16:22
I have a Dell mini 10. It's great except I can't seem to get eos utility to work from it. Although I do have lightroom 2.6.

canonloader
10th of February 2010 (Wed), 16:41
The one Walmart is selling is a renamed Acer, so it's a pretty common model.

Njv
10th of February 2010 (Wed), 20:49
You can get the mini10 for about 300-350 at walmart. I still cant get utilities to work on here.


Errr.

canonloader
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 05:56
Just looked at the specs, it's only using a 160Gb HD? And more than I wanted to pay. :)

RandyS
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 06:15
Yes - my 110 only has a 160GB drive. Don't know (yet) how feasible it is to swap that out yet - I'll sort that out once I start seeing space consumed at too high a rate. :)

Njv
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 07:13
Yeah but it's a good little guy. 160gb is actually pretty good for a netbook, IMO.

jrm27
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 10:06
my netbook only has a 32g ssd. It's perfect for me... I usually keep a really small 500gig external hard drive in my bag. That SSD is durable and awesome.

canonloader
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 10:51
With the size of todays image files, the bigger the better, although I should probably worry more about the processor speed. :)

Njv
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 10:57
I only have 8mp files so it's fine for me :D

canonloader
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 11:03
The Mk3 RAW's are right at 12Mb, not too bad, but the 7D files are monster 26Mb files and took forever to download with a USB card reader. I had to sell it and go back to a Mk3 for that reason alone. I would have needed to upgrade to CS4 and rebuild a whole new box just to edit the damn files, and I couldn't afford it yet. :)

Njv
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 11:11
Haha I hear ya! I need to get a 500gb HD.

canonloader
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 11:24
Might as well just buy a terabyte. I bought one last year for the same price a 300 was 2 years ago. :)

Njv
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 13:51
Might as well just buy a terabyte. I bought one last year for the same price a 300 was 2 years ago. :)



Yeah that is true! I'm loving this app where I can hook my 30d up to the laptop, have the files save differently to lightroom and use my ipod touch to control the camera..its so slick!

RandyS
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 14:36
Yeah that is true! I'm loving this app where I can hook my 30d up to the laptop, have the files save differently to lightroom and use my ipod touch to control the camera..its so slick!
Cool!

I need to try playing with that just for the sake of playing with it - I have a 'Touch' also.

Hmmm - that means I'd have to build a Winders partition on my netbook then. Gotta think about that one.

richierich1212
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 15:07
The Intel Atom doesn't support 64-bit operating systems. So you hopefully will be ok installing EOS utility on the netbook.

canonloader
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 15:44
Apparently the newer ones do. The one I saw definitely said 64bit.

Njv
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 15:49
The Intel Atom doesn't support 64-bit operating systems. So you hopefully will be ok installing EOS utility on the netbook.


uhhhh....... Right now im using an intel atom..with 64-bit....and eos utility doesnt work

nureality
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 16:54
How about trying to install a 32-bit OS on the NetBook? All you'd really need to do is put your hands on the right system drivers.

nureality
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 16:57
Or even Linux and run VMWare to virtualize a 32bit Windows environment. Then you would be able to run the USB.

canonloader
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 16:59
They do sell a 32bit version for it, but it's another $75.

RandyS
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 18:04
FWIW - I'm typing this on a 64 bit Vista (desktop) machine with DPP & EOS Utilitiy installed

canonloader
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 18:14
And you can connect to the camera with a USB cable through EOS Utility?

RandyS
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 18:24
And you can connect to the camera with a USB cable through EOS Utility?
Don't know yet ... hang on ....

RandyS
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 18:30
Don't know yet ... hang on ....

Absolutely.

Just managed to 'play' with it in Live View through the utilities. Worked a treat. http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i61/rsamos/smilies/thumbsup.gif

Njv
11th of February 2010 (Thu), 23:01
Its the screen resolution that is coming in between me and utilities on this netbook..wonder if i could bypass that?

RandyS
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 04:09
Its the screen resolution that is coming in between me and utilities on this netbook..wonder if i could bypass that?

I never tried it before getting rid of Windows, but I've heard that some folks have set the screen resolution (right click on desktop - properties ...) to exceed the native vertical resolution of the netbook to do the EOS Utility install.

I guess it ends up with a display that you have to scroll vertically to see (set it to something like 1024X768 ) but they can get the app installed.

canonloader
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 05:02
This sounds good then, cause all I have heard is, Canon did not make a driver for the USB port to connect to the camera, for Vista or 64bit. Maybe the Netbook versions have it installed.

RandyS
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 05:52
It will be interesting to hear if Nick can get the utilities installed and running on his netbook.

hollis_f
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 05:58
With the size of todays image files, the bigger the better, although I should probably worry more about the processor speed. :)

I'm confused as to why you would want such a massive drive on a netbook? After all, you're not going to be using it to process the images (at least I hope not). It's a good device for backing up pics on holiday, and for tethering. But I'd be getting the actual images transferred to a real computer asap.

canonloader
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 07:37
Frank, that is the primary reason I was looking at it, to store images on when I fill all my cards. I foresee very little use as a tethered shooting aid, although knowing it can do it in a pinch would be an added benefit. Of course, i'll forget my cable no doubt. :)

RandyS
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 07:49
Frank, that is the primary reason I was looking at it, to store images on when I fill all my cards. I foresee very little use as a tethered shooting aid, although knowing it can do it in a pinch would be an added benefit. Of course, i'll forget my cable no doubt. :)
If you weren't worried about using it tethered, you could just get an external CF card reader and use 'file explorer' to copy files to the hard drive. That would at least get you around any problems with installation of EOS Utility (if there really are any).


ETA: And then, you could forget your CF card reader instead of your cable. :)

Njv
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 07:56
Ok I just realized my mini10 is 32 bit. Well the thing I'm stuck on is how to get the resolution higher than 1024x600.... Anyone have any ideas? Off to google land I go!

canonloader
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 08:01
I'll be interested in the outcome.

Njv
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 08:29
Me too..I've been searching all day trying to figure out a way. Im going to have to ask my buddy he if he can try and figure it out.

nubu
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 10:36
I have no problems with my Sony Vaio VPCX11S1E/B Netbook using 32 bit Windows® 7 Professional and my 5D Mark II if that helps. Screen is 1366 × 768, Hard disk a 128 GB SSD Flash one. Very nice, light (780g!) and small combination.... nubu

chris maddock
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 10:54
Ok I just realized my mini10 is 32 bit. Well the thing I'm stuck on is how to get the resolution higher than 1024x600.... Anyone have any ideas? Off to google land I go!

The resolution restriction is because the software writers complied too rigidly to the published recommendations for the OS - 600 px high is below that for XP and above IIRC. It's usually only the installer that causes the trouble, because it's only that which checks that the system meets the requirements.

Do you have an external monitor you can use? Often, these small-screen machines have a limited resolution because of the screen itself - but the video "card" can drive many other resolutions.
I got the utilities onto my Sony Vaio UPC with a 1024x600 resolution this way - when switching to the external display I found I had a shedload of other resolutions available, up to and beyond 1280x1024. The drivers installed fine then, and happily run on only 1024x600.

HTH
Chris

Njv
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 11:17
Thanks Chris! Thats what I'll do, install it through my other monitor, then just run it on the netbook.


Thanks!

hollis_f
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 11:21
Well, I've just used A1Ctl to temporarily up my screen res to 1024x768 so that I can install EOS Utilities. Next step is to install OnOne's dSLR Remote server software. Then it'll be time to play with controlling the 7D, wirelessly, via my iPhone.

If it works I'm hoping to get some wide-angle shots of the Long-Tailed Tits on my bird feeder. They're tame enough to not be worried by a camera on a tripod just a few inches away and dSLR remote means I should be able to grab shots without having to guess if the composition is any good (like I have to do with an ordinary wireless shutter release).

Njv
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 11:28
What is A1CTL? I wanna try it...

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 12:10
Has anyone got a link to a utility that will do this? I found this: Astray 1.4 Beta 1 (google for download link), but supposedly it doesn't work with Windows 7.

jim.holder
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 12:24
To get DPP etc working on your netbook just change the screen res to 1024 X768. I'm now going to talk Windows XP, it must work on Vista or 7 .Start>settings>display>settings... then change to 1024X768 - apply this. You can then load DPP and use it.

It's a pain though- your window needs scrolling up and down to see top and bottom.

I've got 120Gb HDD and this works for me since I only keep about one in five shots for PP. By the time that count goes up Canon will have provided a DPP upgrade that doesn't need fiddling with the OS and 1Tb solid state will be as cheap as chips (french fries)

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 12:26
That's an issue with the HP mini, it won't allow me to change the res above 1024x568. I need to find a driver or utility that will override the graphics card/driver to allow it....

Njv
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 12:34
To get DPP etc working on your netbook just change the screen res to 1024 X768. I'm now going to talk Windows XP, it must work on Vista or 7 .Start>settings>display>settings... then change to 1024X768 - apply this. You can then load DPP and use it.

It's a pain though- your window needs scrolling up and down to see top and bottom.

I've got 120Gb HDD and this works for me since I only keep about one in five shots for PP. By the time that count goes up Canon will have provided a DPP upgrade that doesn't need fiddling with the OS and 1Tb solid state will be as cheap as chips (french fries)


but I cannot get anything over 1024x600 on the dell mini10.

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 12:41
So you're in the same boot as I am. We need something to help us boost or override the resolution.

Does the EOS utility require 1024x768 as well or just DPP?

Njv
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 12:43
So you're in the same boot as I am. We need something to help us boost or override the resolution.

Does the EOS utility require 1024x768 as well or just DPP?


Yeah, I believe the whole package requires it. Because It kept throwing me an error :confused:

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 12:45
Yeah, I believe the whole package requires it. Because It kept throwing me an error :confused:

Did you try hooking up an external monitor (with a higher rez) then installing it?

Njv
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 12:47
Did you try hooking up an external monitor (with a higher rez) then installing it?


No, I'll try right now...be back in about 20minutes to let you know how it goes

sportsshooter50
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 12:47
Here's what I did to get 1024X768 with the Asus 1005HA and Windows 7 Starter that I owned for a short time before returning it. I found this on one of the Asus forums.

Intel graphics drivers for Win7 have support for the compressed resolution .


Access to these modes:

1) Run regedit
2) Search and modify all values "Display1_DownScalingSupported" from "0" to "1"
3) Restart the system
4) Enjoy with the two new resolutions 1024x768 i 1152x864

Make sure you search for all occurances in the registry. After you reboot, the additional resolution will be available. Because you'll be squeezing more into the vertical direction, the screen will appear a little stretched in the horizontal direction.

If you're not comfortable with editing the registry, don't try it.

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 13:00
Here's what I did to get 1024X768 with the Asus 1005HA and Windows 7 Starter that I owned for a short time before returning it. I found this on one of the Asus forums.

Intel graphics drivers for Win7 have support for the compressed resolution .


Access to these modes:

1) Run regedit
2) Search and modify all values "Display1_DownScalingSupported" from "0" to "1"
3) Restart the system
4) Enjoy with the two new resolutions 1024x768 i 1152x864

Make sure you search for all occurances in the registry. After you reboot, the additional resolution will be available. Because you'll be squeezing more into the vertical direction, the screen will appear a little stretched in the horizontal direction.

If you're not comfortable with editing the registry, don't try it.

Awesome! I hope this works with the HP mini, I work in windows registry all the time so I'll give this a shot!

Cool thing is that is sounds like the new rez's are simply options to choose from so once DPP and the EOS utility is installed one could revert back to native rez when not using those apps.

thanks! I'll try it and post back.

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 14:03
No, I'll try right now...be back in about 20minutes to let you know how it goes

Any luck?

sportsshooter50
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 14:18
I had tried the external monitor install method. The software installed, but would not work with the built-in LCD. I still got the error that it required 1024 X 768 resolution.

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 14:42
I had tried the external monitor install method. The software installed, but would not work with the built-in LCD. I still got the error that it required 1024 X 768 resolution.

Ahhh...so it'll install but not run. So the registry fix looks good, but we have yet to see if it'll work on a dell or hp mini.

Thanks for the followup.

jhoag
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 14:46
Does it run from the Netbook if you direct all the video output to an external display set to 10x7 or better? The new versions of EOS utility work perfectly on WIn7 32 or 64 bit, as long as the display geometry is supported. On 10x5 Netbook displays you will also see issues with Adobe apps, as the bottom of the screen will be cut-off. It is still there, but you have to navigate by keyboard (and memory).

JH

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 15:53
Here's what I did to get 1024X768 with the Asus 1005HA and Windows 7 Starter that I owned for a short time before returning it. I found this on one of the Asus forums.

Intel graphics drivers for Win7 have support for the compressed resolution .


Access to these modes:

1) Run regedit
2) Search and modify all values "Display1_DownScalingSupported" from "0" to "1"
3) Restart the system
4) Enjoy with the two new resolutions 1024x768 i 1152x864

Make sure you search for all occurances in the registry. After you reboot, the additional resolution will be available. Because you'll be squeezing more into the vertical direction, the screen will appear a little stretched in the horizontal direction.

If you're not comfortable with editing the registry, don't try it.

Perfect! I just tried this on my HP Mini 110 and it worked like a charm! Thanks for the great tip, it is exactly what I was looking for!

Now when my 7d gets here next week I can try some star trails with my netbook and the EOS utility. Best part about using the netbook is I can work out of my truck camper and get out and away from all the city and light pollution. :D:D:D

sportsshooter50
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 16:13
Great it worked. Netbooks are very handy devices. I kind of miss the one I had. I could carry that little guy anywhere. And with the 250 GB hard drive and 10.5 hours of battery use, I was rarely without it.

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 16:43
Great it worked. Netbooks are very handy devices. I kind of miss the one I had. I could carry that little guy anywhere. And with the 250 GB hard drive and 10.5 hours of battery use, I was rarely without it.

Did you ever use your netbook to control your camera? If so any keepers? What type of setups and subjects did you shoot?

sportsshooter50
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 17:59
Did you ever use your netbook to control your camera? If so any keepers? What type of setups and subjects did you shoot?

I only tried if out a few times at home with the remote view on EOS Utility enabled. It worked just fine. I could change settings on the camera and focus and shoot from the netbook.

My original intent was to use the netbook as a tethered hard drive (a less costly solution to the wireless file transmitter) but I could never figure out how to fire the camera while it was tethered.

woos
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 18:10
I'm really confused....people really can't get EOS utility to work in their copies of 64 bit windows? It works perfectly fine on mine...ponders. Now, I have not tried remote shooting. However I've updated picture styles and stuff with no problems at all . . .

bzollinger
12th of February 2010 (Fri), 18:14
I only tried if out a few times at home with the remote view on EOS Utility enabled. It worked just fine. I could change settings on the camera and focus and shoot from the netbook.

My original intent was to use the netbook as a tethered hard drive (a less costly solution to the wireless file transmitter) but I could never figure out how to fire the camera while it was tethered.

Couldn't fire the camera huh? That's strange. I remember using it on my 10D many many years ago and I thought that right there along with all the other settings was the "shutter" button? Then I remember a setting that tells the camera to send all pictures to the laptop/netbook directly and not to store it on the memory card.

I'll have to check it out when I get everything together. I've got a 12ft USB extension cable so that should help keep the laptop warm while the camera is outside. :cool:

Tom W
13th of February 2010 (Sat), 10:55
Here's what I did to get 1024X768 with the Asus 1005HA and Windows 7 Starter that I owned for a short time before returning it. I found this on one of the Asus forums.

Intel graphics drivers for Win7 have support for the compressed resolution .


Access to these modes:

1) Run regedit
2) Search and modify all values "Display1_DownScalingSupported" from "0" to "1"
3) Restart the system
4) Enjoy with the two new resolutions 1024x768 i 1152x864

Make sure you search for all occurances in the registry. After you reboot, the additional resolution will be available. Because you'll be squeezing more into the vertical direction, the screen will appear a little stretched in the horizontal direction.

If you're not comfortable with editing the registry, don't try it.

That worked like a charm. I wish I could get 1152 X 768 to reduce the s-t-r-e-t-c-h-i-n-g of the image! Still, I installed the software and it works so I now have remote shooting and the ability to process images in a pinch. The small monitor is a hindrance, but the netbook is so useful for other things that I can put up with that on occasion. Maybe I should calibrate it.

Here's the 7D using remote live view shooting through EOS Utility software:

http://www.pbase.com/photosbytom/image/121916092/large.jpg

Have to add, I'm using a 32 bit netbook.

RandyS
13th of February 2010 (Sat), 12:44
Just built a Windows partition last night. I haven't tried installing the EOS Utility yet, but I did download the 'DSLR Remote' (lite) app for my ipod Touch and was able to use that to remotely fire the camera from the ipod. Worked well enough that I'll probably pick up the full version. The lite version will only fire the camera. With the full version you can pretty much change all the camera settings as well as use it for things like an interval timer. Pretty cool app.

Windows recognized the camera with it's included drivers so if I just wanted to use the netbook for overflow storage that's just a drag and drop away.

I may still mess with installing the EOS Utility though. I'm fairly sure this setup won't work remotely as the ipod & the netbook need to be on the same network for DSLR Remote to work. The wi-fi card in the netbook isn't an access point.

bzollinger
13th of February 2010 (Sat), 21:28
Just built a Windows partition last night. I haven't tried installing the EOS Utility yet, but I did download the 'DSLR Remote' (lite) app for my ipod Touch and was able to use that to remotely fire the camera from the ipod. Worked well enough that I'll probably pick up the full version. The lite version will only fire the camera. With the full version you can pretty much change all the camera settings as well as use it for things like an interval timer. Pretty cool app.

Windows recognized the camera with it's included drivers so if I just wanted to use the netbook for overflow storage that's just a drag and drop away.

I may still mess with installing the EOS Utility though. I'm fairly sure this setup won't work remotely as the ipod & the netbook need to be on the same network for DSLR Remote to work. The wi-fi card in the netbook isn't an access point.

I was just talking about this the other day with a friend. Why can't they make wireless cards in laptops so that they can act ask access points? That would be perfect when using the DSLR Remote software! I just plan on using a super long USB cable from monoprice to control my camera.

One of my first projects with EOS utility and my new 7d will be a star trail project. The netbook is really going to come in handy for that one!