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ChiefEagleEye23
30th of March 2010 (Tue), 23:13
Hello there!
I was recently chosen by a friend of mine to shoot her wedding. Now before anybody starts in with the cons and deterring stories, I was offered a couple last year, and reluctantly gave them up, because I know that I didn't have enough notches in my belt just yet. But I believe that this summer is the start to weddings.

I'm not really sure what kinds of questions I have, because as a photographer, and having my own style and vantage points, instinct answers questions like "what are the key shots I need?" and other misc. points. I guess what I'm looking for is inspiring, and informational advice based on previous weddings you have done. The things that you discovered in the field, and you're so glad to have found them out when you did.

Along with technique, maybe some gear suggestions. I'm investing in a 28-135mm f/3.5 in the next couple of days, I have a 400D, a 50mm f/1.8, and will have a BG-E3 by the wedding (on 8/21/2010).

I look forward to hearing about your past ceremonies and getting myself geared up for this one. Thanks in advance! =)

dwarfcow
30th of March 2010 (Tue), 23:19
goooooOOoOoOOOOOOOOD luck. :)


well, lets see... i would recommend having a backup camera, or preferably, use the one you have now as a backup, and maybe rent a 5D classic or 5d II for a primary. personally i don't like zoom lenses, so if i were you i would get a 50 1.4 (rather than the 1.8) and an 85 1.8 for the 5D that you should rent. a nice wide lens is in order as well (17-40 shouldn't be more than $15 to rent for a day)

I remember our first wedding, we charged $750, which at the time seemed like a decent amount, halfway through the day we were much less enthusiastic about it, weddings are a TON of work, especially by yourself.

Mark Anthony
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 02:29
As said above, you need a second body, preferably better than a 400d too.

A variety of focal lengths, 10-22, 24-70, 70-200.

A speedlight for fill flash.

Best of luck too, i must admit you'll be a brave man if you do it with just a 400d, but everyone has to start somewhere i guess.

RaymondXTi
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 03:57
28-135 is gonna be too slow if you're shooting in low light situations IMO, def. pick up a speedlight (and maybe even a battery pack for it) for fill light. Good luck!

Mike30D
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 05:34
You are definitely going to need faster lenses, they need to be at least 2.8 or better. Two speedlights are better than one, but you need at least one.

Weddings are a TON of work, and they make for long days on your feet. Get comfortable shoes.

If you can't afford the equipment you need, then do not be afraid to rent it. You are going to need backups, you never know when a camera will decide to quit working. Pick up a couple of books on the subject and practice what you can, August will be here before you know it.

Read Tim's Wedding FAQ: http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=255604

Since it's your first one, are you getting paid for this? At the very least, make sure you get paid for your expenses.

If you're serious about doing weddings you might also want to get yourself a student membership over at Digital Wedding Forum. Yes you have to pay, but it's totally worth it.

egordon99
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 05:40
FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH

TTk
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 05:48
FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH FLASH


Don't forget 2 or 3 set's of batteries for your FLASH..;):D

egordon99
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 07:30
I have a horrible fear of running out of battery power, so I think I have 8 sets of (4) Eneloops, two sets of Powerex, and a set of Maha for my two Speedlights :(

ChiefEagleEye23
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 18:00
All of this is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks!

Unfortunately, I'm locked into the 28-135mm. I have put too much time in to back out on the seller at this point. I made the decision to purchase it before I got the job. =\

As for a Flash, anyone know a good tutorial that can get me flash-savvy in the next 5 months? I don't use flash, ever... Not even my onboard one. I got so used to my 50mm 1.8 and just never got around to it. =(

And THANK YOU Mike30D. I just skimmed over Tims FAQs and I it's like he's IN MY HEAD!

haha.

Again, thank you everyone, for your wishes, and advice.

Happy snapping. =)

bigarchi
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 18:17
the 28-135 was my main lens on my first couple weddings, so it does work!
especially if you aren't in a dark a$$ church or anything.
a speedlight will be invaluable though.
what kind of venue(s) are the events in?

and renting is worth every penny imho too. especially now that 4 day rentals are more common.
though if you rent anything you aren't familiar with you want to make sure and get that equipment
in your hands well before the big day so you get used to it..etc.. just my thoughts, good luck!

ChiefEagleEye23
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 18:39
the 28-135 was my main lens on my first couple weddings, so it does work!
especially if you aren't in a dark a$$ church or anything.
a speedlight will be invaluable though.
what kind of venue(s) are the events in?

and renting is worth every penny imho too. especially now that 4 day rentals are more common.
though if you rent anything you aren't familiar with you want to make sure and get that equipment
in your hands well before the big day so you get used to it..etc.. just my thoughts, good luck!

Good to hear you say this. Makes me think that my new purchase will be helpful after all.

as for the venue, I have actually been there before many times. It's the HQ for the catering company a just so happen to work for as well. It's called the Portland Club, in Portland ME. Very old building. Gorgeous interior. I can't wait. =D

Here's a link to the building's website, if anybody is interested in seeing the venue.
http://www.theportlandclub.com

Emberghost
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 18:52
I was in your shoes not to long ago so these are some key things I have learned. Check out the venue beforehand if at all possible, bring your camera and take pictures if you forget. Plan out some shots before the big day. Capturing the wedding moments are not nearly as hard as the posed shots with bride and groom as well as large family pictures. When you get there the day of arrive early, again LOOK for good shots and have things in mind beforehand. Nobody wants a photographer that doesn't seem like they know what they're doing.

Make this site your best friend and go through all the articles!
http://strobist.blogspot.com/

Get your flash technique down before the wedding . At the bare minimum get yourself one speedlight that you are able to shoot off camera (will need some way to sync) and an umbrella/stand.
http://www.mpex.com/browse.cfm/2,439.html

Your lenses will work but you are going to want faster ones. My 50 1.4 and 70-200 are the workhorses of the show. I don't know about you but I would not shoot a wedding with one camera. Do you have any friends or family with a DSLR you could borrow or rent from them? My first wedding I paid a friend with a DSLR to come and be my second shooter. That way I could use his camera if mine crapped out, and the bonus of getting shots I may have missed is a plus. That's the basic stuff I can think of right now.

If you didn't hear egordon99 FLASH, get it, learn it, love it. =]

check these out for ideas
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=412392
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=432316
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=66140

Rich1884
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 21:14
I'm reading this talk of flash at weddings with interest. Can somebody direct me to the typical use of flash in a Wedding situation? Are we talking wireless triggered ETTL here, or is the lighting pre measured and metered? Would a typical wedding photographer have any light modifiers or use bare flash?

Forgive my ignorance, but I'm trying to get tips on how the pro photographer sets up pleasing lighting in short time and with portible gear.

Mike30D
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 21:23
ChiefEagleEye,
Emberghost mentioned David Hobby's Strobist site which deals with off-camera flash - great place to start. Check out Neil Van Niekerk's site also that talks alot about working with on-camera flash (in case you can't get the flash off the camera) - http://neilvn.com/tangents/

dwarfcow
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 22:42
I'm reading this talk of flash at weddings with interest. Can somebody direct me to the typical use of flash in a Wedding situation? Are we talking wireless triggered ETTL here, or is the lighting pre measured and metered? Would a typical wedding photographer have any light modifiers or use bare flash?

Forgive my ignorance, but I'm trying to get tips on how the pro photographer sets up pleasing lighting in short time and with portible gear.

We use ETTL II off camera with our 580 EX II's and an ST-E2 and/or the 7D's wireless trigger, its nice especially with flash compensation on camera typically we shoot through 2 medium sized umbrellas for formals and specific shots; and just use maybe a medium diffuser when hand holding off camera (the second shooter holding for unique shots) I like to be non invasive during the actual ceremony, and we try to if any flash at all keep it on camera, and in-direct when possible.

when doing the bouquet toss, or the garter/first dance its nice to have off camera non directional flash (from the side or behind the action as a hair light; especially in a dark reception (and every reception is dark, i haven't figured this crap out)) so we use the cyber syncs for that (which aren't ETTL) so manual settings are used.

Rich1884
31st of March 2010 (Wed), 22:55
Ok, so ambiant and unobtrusive for the ceremony, using flash only as a fill if necessary and balanced strobes w/umbrella for afterwards where you have some leaway to set the stage better!

Very informative; it's certainly a good balance between getting the right pictures and respecting the wedding party.

sebmour
1st of April 2010 (Thu), 07:45
Weddings : $$$$ in investment

You will need fast lenses since the light is very dim in the reception halls and churches.
You will need a very sensitive camera.
You will need to know how to use a 580EXII(no 430EXII or cheaper here).
You will need how to see light, how to compose images and recompose them.
You will need lots of spare batteries.

Image list are not wanted. If you have been to wedding's you understand what are the most important part of them. Don't forget that it's all about emotion.

and GOOD LUCK!

Anthony S
1st of April 2010 (Thu), 12:42
Not knowing much about off camera flash may not be an issue; many don't allow flash anyhow. So that tells me you lens are too slow for weddings, you would have to raise your ISO a lot more then I think anyone would want to.

Off camera flash for the reception is probably allowed and needed. So you will need something to trigger them as well. I would not trust the povertywizards from ebay for a wedding, that leaves you with real pocket wizards or maybe the Paul C Bluff ones.

Triggers, Stands, and maybe umbrellas you will need to buy/acquire. You should be able to rent lens and a nice body, keeping your around for backup.