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MattyB
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 10:29
i'm a bit scared, but more.. excited, and i'm guessing i'll get a few replys warning me not to do it - but my theory is to always jump in with both feet.

a friend of mine got me talking to a guy who's wanting to start up a website for cars, kind of like Street Commodores and Street Machine - but online (if there are any aussies reading).

he wants me to be his photographer, for cars and models.
full photoshoots, in studio and out studio.

at first i told him no, because i don't have the equipment. and i'm not that experienced yet. i told him how i'd need reflectors, soft boxes, externals flashes, etc etc etc, i just started ranting on and on

then he tells me to email him with everything i need, and he'll buy it... obviously not for me, it would be his companys equipment. but he seemed egar for me to let him know. i said "ok, give me a day tol chase up what i need, where and how much"
he told me not to worry about prices..

AND he can get a studio suitable for cars.

so, i'm asking all you pro's reading, what do i tell him?

what do i need?

lighting, studio, lens, etc etc..

i have a 300D with 18-55 lens kit, nothing more. lol

please, only serious replys, no "get the $90,000,000,000 studio setup from RipOff.com" or whatever,

nothing TOO expensive, i don't want to scare him off.

just the starters of the professional series equipment, or what ever you think would make photos good enough.

a quick reply would be appreciated. thanks guys

zacker
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 11:09
no advice ...just good luck, hope it works out for ya.. I would tell him you do need the 1DS MKII and some nice "L" glass and then you can borrow it on weekends and stuff!
just a thought!
-zacker-

MattyB
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 11:25
i'm hoping to stick with my 300D, no use using a 1Ds on the job if i can't learn to use it all hours of the day and night.

will a 18-55mm get the job done if given the right lighting equipment? i'm not to sure if he'll be keen on buying a whole bunch of lens' for my canon, but i can always suggest it when you lot tell me what i need

zacker
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 11:56
well, if he is serious i would hit him up for a camera with more power. And you'll definetly want better glass... Im no expert but if this is for a pro site, i bet he'd want pro equipment. Dont get me wrong, your 300D would do a fine job.. but if your working for him HE SHOULD BUY THE EQUIPMENT! What if your shooting a shot and drop your camera and it smashes?? you gotta replace it? And im sure with you being the photog, you'd be able to take stuff home for the weekend and at night, most places will let you.Im not saying to rob the guy but as long as you treat it like your own and bring it back in with you, no harm no foul! at least hit him up for a nice Apple comp and PS CS2... i would get at least a couple of "L" lenses. maybe a couple of PRIMES? 50MM, 85MM, 135MM?? (if there is one..lol)
-zacker-

zacker
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 12:01
"i'm not to sure if he'll be keen on buying a whole bunch of lens' for my canon," He wouldnt be buying it for YOUR canon if you tell him you want a Canon Camera.... will he sing a statement saying he'll replace anything of yours if it breaks while on the job? or is this more of a free lance thing..i was under the impression you'd be his " employee" if so, HE should buy ALL equipment.
-zacker-

PhotosGuy
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 12:25
If you're just shooting for the web, the kit lens at f/8 to f/16 & a tripod should work out well.
The ideal studio will need a coved background, HUGE overhead & rolling flats, as well as focusable quarts lights in the 750wt to 20K range. Expensive stuff! (http://extranet.mole.com/public/index.cgi?cmd=view_item&parent=1899-2004&id=67730)
You can get by with less...like shooting on location. ;)

Jon, The Elder
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 12:40
MattyB - Stick with Photosguy - he can't shoot horses, but he REALLY knows his cars - try sending a PM, if he's in a good mood he can steer you in the right direction for sure. This is an unpaid announcement !!

MattyB
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 21:35
for sure, franks my POTN idol ;)

MattyB
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 21:39
If you're just shooting for the web, the kit lens at f/8 to f/16 & a tripod should work out well.
The ideal studio will need a coved background, HUGE overhead & rolling flats, as well as focusable quarts lights in the 750wt to 20K range. Expensive stuff! (http://extranet.mole.com/public/index.cgi?cmd=view_item&parent=1899-2004&id=67730)
You can get by with less...like shooting on location. ;)

could you suggest a few lighting tools which i'd benefit from on location?

if he gets a studio, i'll tell him he needs "huge overhead & rolling flats" and all the other stuff - but

for carparks, scenery, etc etc. - what would i need?

PhotosGuy
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 21:58
The most important thing is to wait for the right light. Did you miss seeing these, Matt?
A few Car Lighting Tips (http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=70290)
Other examples here. (http://photobucket.com/albums/v218/PhotosGuy/Samples%20-%20Rides/)

MattyB
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 22:06
i didn't miss them, they're my bible ;) was just wondering if there is anything that automotive magazine photographers buy to get a better photo.

ta frank :D

ps:, u got msn messenger?

PhotosGuy
20th of September 2005 (Tue), 23:37
The 16-35mm f/2.8L would be nice to have but you really don't need it. I'm using the 28-70 f/2.8L & it's sometimes just a bit too short for some pics, but I don't need it for just web pics either. Only problem with the kit lens is that you'll get a lot of use out of your tripod, but that's not a bad thing. It worked fine for me last year. A remote release would come in handy for those 8 sec exposures.

We used to have a long 6' wide roll of black cloth to run along the side of cars for 3/4 shots, just out of frame, to put a darker reflection in the lower half, but that is a PITA.
A 4X6' sheet of plywood painted white will give cleaner reflections in the chrome for front end shots.

A graduated ND filter set (Conkin) might come in handy if you don't want to control contrast in PS (which I haven't been doing this year, so don't look for the results). I have some but don't bother with them & they sit in a case at home. They were critical when I was shooting 8X10" film though.

Sorry I can't point you to a magic solution. The most important things are the light & your eye. ;)

Nope, no messenger. Fossil, remember? :D

MattL
21st of September 2005 (Wed), 07:17
If you're just shooting for the web, the kit lens at f/8 to f/16 & a tripod should work out well.
The ideal studio will need a coved background, HUGE overhead & rolling flats, as well as focusable quarts lights in the 750wt to 20K range. Expensive stuff! (http://extranet.mole.com/public/index.cgi?cmd=view_item&parent=1899-2004&id=67730)
You can get by with less...like shooting on location. ;)

I would err away from buying a room full of 20k's. I use these beasts daily in my job, and they are not something you want to be working with. They are heavy, hot, annoying, big, AND, you'll need to install your own substation to power the damm things!

I would stop by your local theatrical / tv lighting company, and ask for some blondes :lol: with biig chimera softboxes. These are tungsten lights around the 2kw mark. Also ask for glass daylight filters for them.

I would get as many as 10 of these for a really flexible setup. They are a nice enough size that you could throw two in the back if you go out on location, and look something like this :
http://www.lumex-cinema.com/images/chimera_tungstene.jpg

I cant stress the need for decent power in whatever studio space you setup in tho.

Hope this is of some use for you! Good luck in your venture!

PhotosGuy
21st of September 2005 (Wed), 08:30
I would err away from buying a room full of 20k's. I use these beasts daily in my job, and they are not something you want to be working with. They are heavy, hot, annoying, big, AND, you'll need to install your own substation to power the damm things! Good points, but I was talking about the ideal studio where you might have to include moving models in the shot. The chimera softboxes would work well with them but if you try to light a flat with them, you lose control of the light as it can't be focused on the flat to provide lighter/darker tones in the car.
I doubt that Matts friend is going to spring for the $s to equip an ideal studio, but it doesn't hurt to dream! ;)

Afterthought: Matt, the roll of black cloth above needs at least two light stands, sandbags, AND two assistants to set it up. You can't be one of them 'cause you have to be at the cam where you can see the effect.

Longwatcher
21st of September 2005 (Wed), 14:20
Here are my lists if I were you (remember I am not you though)

Really short/very low cost list:
Keep what you have and shoot outdoors on nice days, maybe get a fill flash.
Have him get a second camera 10D or 20D with a 50/1.8 for backup.
This will cost him about $2000 at most.

Short/low cost list:
1. get a 5D with 24-70 and 17-40 lenses. (a second 5D or a 1DM2N would be optional)
2. get a kit set of 3 or 4 Alien Bees and a vagabond battery
3. get or find a good backdrop area to shoot full size cars and trucks.
Cost will be about $10,000

not carried away but good list
1. get a pair of 1D series (one 1DM2n and one 1DsMkII)
2. Get a full set of lenses in order 24-70/2.8L, 16-35/2.8L, 70-200/2.8L IS, 50/1.4, 85/1.2, 135/2, 24/1.4.
3. get a set of 6+ professional studio lights aith various reflectors, softboxes and umbrellas.
4. build a large studio with a good backdrop
Cost will about $30000 plus studio.

I think for starting out you mostly have what you need. A couple of good 580EX flashes will probably come in handy. I suspect though that you will want to start out low and build up, so just go with what you have and find a releiable dealer you can get equipment in 72 hours from. Then buy as needed.

Just my opinion,