Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Read More.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon Accessories
Thread started 12 Dec 2006 (Tuesday) 03:29
Prev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

Crumpler The Whickey And Cox Review

 
Greg_C
Cream of the Crop
Greg_C's Avatar
12,674 posts
Gallery: 10 photos
Joined Nov 2005
Brisbane, Australia
Dec 12, 2006 03:29 |  #1

A short time ago I bought a Crumpler The Whickey And Cox. This is their medium size backpack that will also accommodate a 15" laptop. The two other bags currently in this range are The Keystone (smaller) and the The Karachi Outpost (larger). I've been a long time Lowepro user and finally decided that I wanted a bag that felt a bit better on my back. This was the main reason for the change. I've still kept the Computrekker though even though I think it feels like two large bricks strapped to your back when loaded. I'm lucky enough to have a dedicated Crumpler store in town close to where I work. I road tested the bag twice with my gear to see how it would fit before I bought it.

Still working on some photos. I currently carry the following. 30D + BG-E2 with the EF 24-105mm attached, EF 70-200mm F2.8 IS, EF-S 10-22mm, Sigma EF 30mm, 580EX, Spare cards, Blower, Off Camera Shoe Cord 2, lens hoods for all lenses, Card reader, Spare batteries for the 580, Filter Case with CP etc in it.

Good Points

1. It carries very well! This bag feels more like a regular backpack. This is probably because of the shape and the weight distribution. The shoulder straps are very substantial and well curved so they sit better on your shoulders. The shoulder straps have a plastic loop on then to attach things. They sit about shoulder level for me. Never understood what I'd personally use these for myself.

2. A nice solid feel to the bag, the main material on the bag is thick and heavy. All of the stitching and zips are good of quality. The zips to open the bag are not accessed from the front of the bag. You have to lay the bag down on its front and then open the zip that runs along the seam at the back. The idea of the zips opening at the back of the bag doesn't worry me, adds a bit of extra security. Crumpler promote the idea of laying the bag down on the front as a way to not get your back messy when you wear the bag after opening it in a muddy area.

3. It comes with plenty of dividers. I removed a quite a few dividers and the mesh bag that was at the top. How you arrange things will probably depend on the lenses you wish to carry but I think as soon as you add a longish zoom you'll be removing dividers to fit it in. The mesh bag is a nice idea but takes up valuable room at the top of the bag.

4. The two zip pockets on the sides are not huge but do hold a bit due to their tapered shape. These pockets curve around towards the front of the bag. The zip opening is small and tight and getting my hand in is a little difficult. I guess you could say the bag really doesn't have sides, at least the big boxy sides that the Lowepro Computrekker has.

5. The removable inner shell is a great idea. This just attaches to the inside of the bag via velcro. It does a have a tendency to slip down a little but it can only go so far. The space it leaves at the top is perfect for storing the waste strap. When you remove the inner shell this it converts the bag from a camera bag to a normal daypack.

6. The pouch for the laptop attaches to the back of the inside via velcro and I like the idea that it is removable pouch. I don't use this most of the time and this leaves a little extra room in the bag against your back. I've sometimes carried a folded up jacket in this space.

7. The waste strap is removable. This is a great idea and it folds up small enough to store in the bag for when you don't need it.

8. It doesn't look like a camera bag, it looks more like a regular backpack than a camera bag.

9. It holds more than you think at first look. With a bit of rearrangement I can fit one less lens in the The Whickey And Cox than I can in the Lowepro Computrekker.

10. It does have a loop and a strap on the front of the bag to sling a tripod from. I haven't tried this yet.

Bad Points

1. I'd really like a rain cover like the Lowepro AW series of bags have. That said the construction of the The Whickey And Cox looks well enough constructed to live up to its blurb as water resistant, not that I hope to test this out anytime soon.

2. I find it real hard to remove the camera from the bottom part of the bag. It doesn't just slip out easily so its not a option to quickly take the bag off your back and whip out the camera. You really have to undo two separate zips, the first is the main zip on the back and the second is the one for the camera gear area. I guess you could leave the second one undone and just pull back the flap if you wanted, I choose not too to give get that extra level of security.

3. The sloping nature of the side pockets mean that they don't have the depth of a Lowepro style bag. Small primes fit in easily, longer primes like a 100mm macro will best fit on their side. This takes up more room and means you have to remove additional dividers. If I need to carry the macro I have to reorganise and carry the lens hoods loose. This means the macro can go vertical in the centre of the bag and the 10-22 moves across to the sides.

4. Price. All of the Crumpler line is priced at the top end. This was a bit if a stumbling block for me as seeing I was planning on keeping the Computrekker I had to be sure I was getting all that I wanted.

5. The little loop on the top doesn't compare to the handles that come of the other bags have.

6. I'd like it to have some loops on the side to attach some lens cases like the Lowepro Sliplock series. You could use the loops on the front that are for the tripod for this but that wil preclude carring a tripod here.

Conclusion

I'm very happy with this bag, it suits my needs at the moment. The best thing I find about it the comfort factor. If you have got this far you MUST check out the Crumpler Web siteexternal link. It has got to be the one of the most original and out there web sites around.

Update - March '09
I've had this bag for more than two years now and it is still going strong. It is still used as my main bag almost all the time.

I did have a problem in mid 08 with a zipper that broke. I presented the bag to the local Crumpler store and received a repaired bag two weeks later. No receipt needed.


Greg
Blogexternal link | Photogalleryexternal link | 1DmkIV + other stuff
Sanity is a madness put to good use.



LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)
lkrms
"stupidly long verbal diarrhoea"
lkrms's Avatar
4,558 posts
Joined Jun 2006
Newcastle, Australia
Dec 12, 2006 04:05 |  #2

Great review Greg!!

I second all of your points for the Karachi Outpost, which is obviously (from what you've said) exactly the same as the Whickey and Cox, but biggerer.

I fit this in it (by using the laptop carrier for storage :-( -- but I could probably fix this):

2 x 30D + BG-E2 + POTN straps
2 x 580EX + stands + omnibounces + flip-its
Canon 24-70/2.8 w/hood
Canon 70-200/2.8 w/hood
Canon 50/1.4
Tokina 12-24 w/hood
Kenko tubes -- full set
Sekonic L-358 light/flash meter
Flash extension cord
Cheap eBay wireless triggers
Remote cord
Manuals

Tight fit, but does the job.

Again, I second all of your points re: the pros and cons of this bag. Great piece of gear tho -- worth the money considering how many $$$ of stuff it stores ;-)a


Luke
Headshot photographer Sydney and Newcastle (external link) | Twitter (external link) | Facebook (external link) | Blog (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
holland_patrick
Senior Member
holland_patrick's Avatar
810 posts
Joined Dec 2005
Ct
Jan 13, 2007 13:15 |  #3

I would love to see a picture of this...:D


linarms wrote in post #2388256external link
Great review Greg!!

I second all of your points for the Karachi Outpost, which is obviously (from what you've said) exactly the same as the Whickey and Cox, but biggerer.

I fit this in it (by using the laptop carrier for storage :-( -- but I could probably fix this):

2 x 30D + BG-E2 + POTN straps
2 x 580EX + stands + omnibounces + flip-its
Canon 24-70/2.8 w/hood
Canon 70-200/2.8 w/hood
Canon 50/1.4
Tokina 12-24 w/hood
Kenko tubes -- full set
Sekonic L-358 light/flash meter
Flash extension cord
Cheap eBay wireless triggers
Remote cord
Manuals

Tight fit, but does the job.

Again, I second all of your points re: the pros and cons of this bag. Great piece of gear tho -- worth the money considering how many $$$ of stuff it stores ;-)a


Rebel XT,1D Mark IIN
Canon 100-400L, 17-40 4.0L, 50 1.8,200 2.8L
70-200 2.8 IS L
Simga 30 1.4, SIGMA 50 1.4
http://www.photocastne​twork.com/external link

LOG IN TO REPLY
lkrms
"stupidly long verbal diarrhoea"
lkrms's Avatar
4,558 posts
Joined Jun 2006
Newcastle, Australia
Jan 13, 2007 14:05 |  #4

Ok, I'll take a picture soon. My Tokina 12-24 is currently being replaced by a Canon 17-40, so when it arrives I'll re-shoot my full bag ;-)a


Luke
Headshot photographer Sydney and Newcastle (external link) | Twitter (external link) | Facebook (external link) | Blog (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
dogfood
Member
63 posts
Joined Oct 2005
Jan 16, 2007 17:15 |  #5

I've had this bag for a year-and-a-half, pretty much since it came out. I only use it for vacations, but if you would indulge me, I'd like to add a some additional feedback:

1. It's heavy. When packed with a DSLR, a couple lenses, and a 15" Powerbook, it's surprisingly heavy. It doesn't feel heavy on your back so much, but when you take it off, it lands with a 'thunk'. Think overhead bins...

2. When loaded up with a laptop, the back flap (where the laptop sleeve resides) flops out when you open it. This is necessary to access all the camera gear in the front. While it's not a big deal, you're forced to have a lot of personal space around you to operate this bag. Once again, think vacation; this is not a bag to trifle with in an economy seat, or while trying to get that impulse shot of sunset somewhere.

3. For all the space it offers, if you have it loaded with camera and computer, there is no room for a book. You may be able to jimmie a magazine or two in, but a medium sized softcover airport fiction novel is too fat (forget about a hardcover from the bookstore)

4. As previously mentioned, there is no speedy access to anything. (step one: remove pack, step two: unzip outside, step 3: open back like oyster carefully as to not slam laptop on the ground, step 4: unzip inner liner to access camera, step 5: remove camera. to close, do all in reverse)

Still, for what it does, it's a cool bag. Holds 'everything' and a tripod on the outside. Feels bulletproof when zipped up, comfortable to carry (but beware of sweaty back syndrome in warm climates) and looks good.

Hope that helps!

DF




LOG IN TO REPLY
lkrms
"stupidly long verbal diarrhoea"
lkrms's Avatar
4,558 posts
Joined Jun 2006
Newcastle, Australia
Jan 28, 2007 14:47 |  #6

Finally, the photo of my fully loaded Karachi Outpost:

IMAGE NOT FOUND IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'text/html' | Byte size: ZERO


The stuff you can't see (at the very bottom of the backpack) is my 70-200 2.8, Sekonic light meter, and 2 POTN straps.

Luke
Headshot photographer Sydney and Newcastle (external link) | Twitter (external link) | Facebook (external link) | Blog (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
JustinLawrence
Goldmember
JustinLawrence's Avatar
2,497 posts
Joined Feb 2008
SYdney, AUstralia
Mar 16, 2008 06:50 as a reply to lkrms's post |  #7

Greg, in regards to your bad point #2, i had the exact same problem, it was driving me crazy. i have since reconfigured the dividers and i now store my 5D on its side with the grip facing upwards, this way it doesnt get stuck and you have something solid to grab hold of. Here are some photos i took of my set up.

IMAGE: http://www.strainedbeans.com/POTN/WhickeyCox01.jpg

IMAGE: http://www.strainedbeans.com/POTN/WhickeyCox02.jpg

IMAGE: http://www.strainedbeans.com/POTN/WhickeyCox03.jpg

IMAGE: http://www.strainedbeans.com/POTN/WhickeyCox04.jpg

IMAGE: http://www.strainedbeans.com/POTN/WhickeyCox05.jpg

Justin

Gear List

LOG IN TO REPLY
Mashimaro
Senior Member
Mashimaro's Avatar
816 posts
Joined Jun 2009
Vancouver
Aug 30, 2010 23:38 as a reply to JustinLawrence's post |  #8

Hey guys,

I know this post is pretty old but i'm thinking of picking up this bag tomorrow. any complaints at all?

i'm using the 6MDH currently but was thinking of picking up this bag for my upcoming trip to Puerto Vallarta.

I don't have a lot of gear as you can see in my sig so any advice regarding this bag would be great! thanks you guys! :)


Canon 5D4 / Sony A7R2 / Leica M240

LOG IN TO REPLY
Mashimaro
Senior Member
Mashimaro's Avatar
816 posts
Joined Jun 2009
Vancouver
Aug 30, 2010 23:47 as a reply to Mashimaro's post |  #9

oh and another question: does this bag work as a carry-on with North American airlines? :) thanks!!


Canon 5D4 / Sony A7R2 / Leica M240

LOG IN TO REPLY
nonick
Goldmember
1,587 posts
Joined Jun 2009
NYC
Aug 31, 2010 00:30 |  #10

An excellent quick review and summary. It's a great bag but I sold mine because I got too many bags and didn't use the bag as often as I had planned to. Hard to quickly access the camera and the curved design (shallow interior) are the two major features that turned me down.

Now, I have thinktank and tamrac... Still believe crumpler offers the best material quality and is much more stylish. But the Thinktank and tamrac are just more practical.


Gear|Searching for 7DII, Buying 5DIII 35L II, 24-70 2.8L IS

LOG IN TO REPLY
JustinLawrence
Goldmember
JustinLawrence's Avatar
2,497 posts
Joined Feb 2008
SYdney, AUstralia
Sep 05, 2010 05:59 |  #11

Mashimaro wrote in post #10820736external link
Hey guys,

I know this post is pretty old but i'm thinking of picking up this bag tomorrow. any complaints at all?

i'm using the 6MDH currently but was thinking of picking up this bag for my upcoming trip to Puerto Vallarta.

I don't have a lot of gear as you can see in my sig so any advice regarding this bag would be great! thanks you guys! :)

Your gear will all fit in this bag, no problems there.
Personally i dont like this bag, its just too bulky and hard to access. I think ive used it maybe twice in the 3 or so years ive owned it.
BTW I also own the 6MHD and i love it, i use it every time i go out with my camera.

Mashimaro wrote in post #10820782external link
oh and another question: does this bag work as a carry-on with North American airlines? :) thanks!!

What dimensions do they allow?

nonick wrote in post #10821005external link
An excellent quick review and summary. It's a great bag but I sold mine because I got too many bags and didn't use the bag as often as I had planned to. Hard to quickly access the camera and the curved design (shallow interior) are the two major features that turned me down.

Now, I have thinktank and tamrac... Still believe crumpler offers the best material quality and is much more stylish. But the Thinktank and tamrac are just more practical.

+1 on all accounts.


Justin

Gear List

LOG IN TO REPLY
Mashimaro
Senior Member
Mashimaro's Avatar
816 posts
Joined Jun 2009
Vancouver
Sep 05, 2010 13:36 |  #12

JustinLawrence wrote in post #10852995external link
Your gear will all fit in this bag, no problems there.
Personally i dont like this bag, its just too bulky and hard to access. I think ive used it maybe twice in the 3 or so years ive owned it.
BTW I also own the 6MHD and i love it, i use it every time i go out with my camera.

What dimensions do they allow?

+1 on all accounts.

Thank you for the feedback JustinLawrence!

i do find it a bit bulky and definately hard to access compared to my 6MDH. however, the hard to access part was appealing to me since i'll be heading to Mexico with it in about a weeks time.

i pretty much bought this bag for the trip and maybe if i decide to take my DSLR with me on bike rides (motorcycle and bicycle).

i agree though, the 6MDH is my go to bag when i'm near home :)

i'll have to double check as i'll be flying with Westjet...

ps - i got the bag for dirt cheap off my local craiglist. used but in very mint shape only cost me $60 CAD.


Canon 5D4 / Sony A7R2 / Leica M240

LOG IN TO REPLY
JustinLawrence
Goldmember
JustinLawrence's Avatar
2,497 posts
Joined Feb 2008
SYdney, AUstralia
Sep 06, 2010 03:26 |  #13

Mashimaro wrote in post #10854453external link
Thank you for the feedback JustinLawrence!

i do find it a bit bulky and definately hard to access compared to my 6MDH. however, the hard to access part was appealing to me since i'll be heading to Mexico with it in about a weeks time.

i pretty much bought this bag for the trip and maybe if i decide to take my DSLR with me on bike rides (motorcycle and bicycle).

i agree though, the 6MDH is my go to bag when i'm near home :)
i'll have to double check as i'll be flying with Westjet...
ps - i got the bag for dirt cheap off my local craiglist. used but in very mint shape only cost me $60 CAD.

No worries. I would imagine it would be good for Mexico, at lease it can't be unzipped without you realizing it. The bag is really comfy and really well made (like all crumplier bags) and you can feel safe that your gear is protected as it is very well padded. Have fun in Mexico!


Justin

Gear List

LOG IN TO REPLY
phreeky
Goldmember
3,471 posts
Joined Oct 2007
Australia
Sep 06, 2010 05:58 |  #14

I have the keystone and it has two main uses for me:
- Travel, where I want to feel secure (would be very difficult to access without you knowing!); and
- On the mountain bike, it's not too big and bulky and is quite comfy.

FYI in the keystone I can fit (comfortably) a 7D with 400 F/5.6 attached, Canon 70-300 IS, Sigma 150, and 1.4xTC - a good setup for the maintain bike where I'm after nature/wildlife shots. Holidaying in Europe I carried a 20D, Tamron 28-75, Tamron 11-18, 2xTC, 10" laptop, plus other stuff like a GPS/thin jacket/wallet/phone/pa​ssports/etc (was tight with all this).

Awesome build, but hard to access and therefore feels very secure.




LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

26,772 views & 0 likes for this thread
Crumpler The Whickey And Cox Review
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon Accessories


Not a member yet? Click here to register to the forums.
Registered members get all the features: search, following threads, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, settings, view hosted photos, own reviews and more...


AAA

Send feedback to staff    •   Jump to forum...    •   Rules    •   Index    •   New posts    •   RTAT    •   'Best of'    •   Gallery    •   Gear    •   Reviews    •   Polls

COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy policy and cookie usage info.

POWERED BY AMASS 1.4version 1.4
made in Finland
by Pekka Saarinen
for photography-on-the.net
Spent 0.00125 for 6 database queries.
PAGE COMPLETED IN 0.05s
Latest registered member is GHPub
969 guests, 458 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017