Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Read More.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk 
Thread started 16 Aug 2011 (Tuesday) 13:12
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

What am I doing wrong?

 
Jim ­ Neiger
Senior Member
608 posts
Gallery: 32 photos
Likes: 9
Joined Sep 2007
Location: Kissimmee, Florida
     
Aug 20, 2011 19:23 |  #16

Another thing I should mention is to avoid using teleconverters until your skill has been developed a bit. The TCs make it more difficult.


Jim Neiger - Kissimmee, Florida
Get the Book: Flight Plan - How to Photograph Birds in Flight (external link)
Please visit my website: www.flightschoolphotog​raphy.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
blonde
Buck Naked Floozies
Avatar
8,405 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Oct 2005
Location: Boston, MA
     
Aug 20, 2011 19:34 |  #17

i have been using Jim's technique for all my in flight shots and i can tell you that it does work and i can also tell you that he is 100% correct about the use of the TC. what people don't understand is that shooting birds and especially birds in flight is a skill that you need to develop. you can't just pick up a heavy combination and expect to master it in a matter of days. if you are serious about improving, you will need to practice a LOT. i started with tracking the bigger birds and then slowly moved to the more difficult birds.

with that said, a lot of people seem to focus a lot on the gear and even on the technique but don't pay enough attention to the value in knowing your subject. once you really observe the bird and know how they behave, this gets MUCH easier. most birds (except for those damn swallows) are VERY predictable and have very unique flying styles. most experienced bird shooters can tell you exactly what a bird is going to do before it actually does it so they know how to anticipate.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Shockey
Goldmember
1,187 posts
Joined Jan 2010
Location: Boise Idaho
     
Aug 20, 2011 21:10 |  #18

Jim is obviously an acknowledged expert at this.

It is probably obvious but the smaller the lens and magnification the easier this is.
With a 500 and the kind of magnication and weight involved is the application I made my first post in reference to utilizing the wind, angles and the tripod with appropriate ball head.
Yes normally tracking birds in flight is easier with out using a tripod....except with a huge lens and huge magnification....or after LOTS of practice perfecting the technique with smaller and lighter lenses....once you get it down, then graduate to heaver lenses with more magnification.


___________
Boise Portrait Photographer
www.alloutdoor.smugmug​.com (external link)
www.aoboudoirboise.smu​gmug.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Jim ­ Neiger
Senior Member
608 posts
Gallery: 32 photos
Likes: 9
Joined Sep 2007
Location: Kissimmee, Florida
     
Aug 20, 2011 21:43 |  #19

Shockey wrote in post #12970110 (external link)
Jim is obviously an acknowledged expert at this.

It is probably obvious but the smaller the lens and magnification the easier this is.
With a 500 and the kind of magnication and weight involved is the application I made my first post in reference to utilizing the wind, angles and the tripod with appropriate ball head.
Yes normally tracking birds in flight is easier with out using a tripod....except with a huge lens and huge magnification....or after LOTS of practice perfecting the technique with smaller and lighter lenses....once you get it down, then graduate to heaver lenses with more magnification.

The longer lenses are always easier hand held then tripod mounted for BIF. The biggest advantage of hand held is the ability to do the initial acquistion as I described. You can't pop the camera, lens, and tripod up to your eye to line up with your line of sight. The difference hand held vs tripod is HUGE. I spend a lot of time shooting with some of the best tripod shooters out there. When it comes to BIF shooting hand held is many times more productive and much easier.


Jim Neiger - Kissimmee, Florida
Get the Book: Flight Plan - How to Photograph Birds in Flight (external link)
Please visit my website: www.flightschoolphotog​raphy.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
CameraMan
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
13,304 posts
Gallery: 26 photos
Likes: 715
Joined Dec 2010
Location: In The Sticks
     
Aug 20, 2011 21:58 |  #20

Kevin Hall wrote in post #12950283 (external link)
Huntersdad is correct, there is technique developed for hand holding 500 and 600mm lenses to make birds in flight images. The guy you need to look up is Jim Neiger and either read as much info that he has offered online as you can or take one of his Flight School workshops.

I just checked his web site. Looks like an interesting thing to look into.


Photographer (external link) | The Toys! | Facebook (external link) | Video (external link) | Flickr (external link)
Shampoo sounds like an unfortunate name for a hair product.
You're a ghost driving a meat-coated skeleton made from stardust, riding a rock, hurtling through space. Fear Nothing!

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,814 views & 0 likes for this thread
What am I doing wrong?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.0forum software
version 2.0 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is photographyman
699 guests, 423 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.