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Thread started 15 Aug 2012 (Wednesday) 13:49
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CPL: Hoya or B+W? What's your opinion?

 
booja
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Aug 16, 2012 11:59 |  #16

i have both a marumi CPL and B+W CPL. i dont see any differnce. if i could do it again id probably get marumi. you could almost buy 2 marumi filters for the price of a B+W




  
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Aug 16, 2012 12:05 |  #17

B+W are top notch...


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fishinfool
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Aug 17, 2012 03:26 |  #18

B+W every time.


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i-G12
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Aug 17, 2012 07:47 |  #19

Since this will be my first filter for my 15-85 which I bought this Wednesday I am not as concered about the price. Don't get me wrong, I'm not rolling in money but would like to get the best I can this time around. So probably the B + W would be my choice. Now the question is still whether the slim model is necessary or not. I'm thinking probably not for my level of photography at this point. Plus reading about the problems with attaching the lens cap on the slim model is somewhat problematic.

Also if I do go with the B + W then it's a decision between the Kaesemann and non Kaesemann models. We're talking a difference of about $18. I probably don't need that either but just looking for opinions knowing that the $$$ isn't paramount in this particular case.




  
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DiMAn0684
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Aug 17, 2012 09:13 |  #20

i-G12 wrote in post #14869880 (external link)
Also if I do go with the B + W then it's a decision between the Kaesemann and non Kaesemann models. We're talking a difference of about $18. I probably don't need that either but just looking for opinions knowing that the $$$ isn't paramount in this particular case.

As far as I know KSM has a slightly higher build quality.


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Whortleberry
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Aug 17, 2012 12:24 |  #21

I'd definitely go for a slim-style mount. At some time in the future, you may need it to prevent vignetting (different lens??) and then you'd be faced with spending a load more money to get something which performs the same function as existing gear.

The B+W slim-line not accepting a clip-on lens cap is far from an insuperable problem - slip-on lens caps were used decades before clip-ons came on the scene and have been used to protect some extremely valuable optics. B+W do recognise the 'problem' of slim filters and make caps for the purpose - HERE (external link)

The Marumi is both slim and accepts the normal lens cap - non-existent problem here then.


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Aug 17, 2012 12:55 |  #22

The slip on cap that comes with the KSM slim version works fine. The other reason for getting a slim version is that you can stack it on a ND filter to get an extra stop and reduce vignatting possibilities.


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Aug 17, 2012 12:55 |  #23

I don't know what other lenses you might have, but you may want to get a 77mm CPL and just use step-up rings to use them with your lenses. the CPL is a specialized lens (unlike a standard UV lens that you can keep on your lenses at all times). your 15-85 uses a 72mm filter, but if you later decide to get some of the L lenses, which are typically 77mm, you can always switch it over to those lenses as well.


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Aug 17, 2012 13:29 |  #24

Is there a cheaper line of filters for Hoya?




  
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Wilt
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Aug 17, 2012 13:38 |  #25

Sparkeyluv wrote in post #14871120 (external link)
Is there a cheaper line of filters for Hoya?

There are multiple lines of filters from Hoya...from cheapest to best (note that all of these are not necessarily still in production, as the product line has evolved):

  • Hoya 'blue box' and 'green box'
  • Hoya HMC and Hoya Pro 1 Digital
  • Hoya HD and Hoya Pro 1 (not Digital) and Hoya S-HMC
I very strongly suggest you totally ignore the first category of filter!!!

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Whortleberry
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Aug 17, 2012 16:28 |  #26

I am led to believe that the Hoya 'green box' are only single coated on the front surface (away from the lens) - and uncoated on the rear surface. Whether this is true or urban myth is open to conjecture.

One difficulty we have is the huge variety of naming protocols used for the same product in various markets. Last time I looked, there were something like 56 different packaging options for a single Hoya filter - when you add in the Kenko flavour of the same thing in other markets, it's no wonder we get confused.

Is there a cheaper line of filters for Hoya? Yes. Should you buy one? NO. I'm not sure why it is, but there is this little mental imbalance in many of us to spend really good money on decent lenses and then skimp on the filter we put in front. It's not a new thing by any means, being going on since the 1960s from my personal knowledge. Just seems completely illogical - especially if you think that the potential saving is often such a tiny proportion of the cost of the lens whose optical qualities the cheap filter is likely to ruin.

Afterthought: I'm definitely with Wilt on the 'Green box' Hoya - how fast can you run. Away. :lol:


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Aug 17, 2012 16:32 |  #27

Hoya's multicoated filters of various variety are fine but if their polarizers don't hold together as well as they used to then that's disappointing. Most of my filters are Hoya and B+W, they're all multicoated and optically I have no complaints about either. In fact I'm waiting on a new 3 stop HMC Hoya & 16GB CF card to arrive but the USPS appears to have lost them for the past couple days (missent according to tracking, sigh).

For what it's worth, all my polarizers do happen to be Hoya but at least one of them is probably due to be replaced due to wear and tear.


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Aug 17, 2012 17:43 |  #28

Whortleberry wrote in post #14871819 (external link)
I am led to believe that the Hoya 'green box' are only single coated on the front surface (away from the lens) - and uncoated on the rear surface. Whether this is true or urban myth is open to conjecture.

Here is the real situation, as explained by Hoya's web site,
"The difference between Hoya’s standard line and that of other manufacturers is that Hoya standard filters have one layer of anti-reflective coating applied to each surface of the glass...The difference between Hoya’s standard line and that of other manufacturers is that Hoya standard filters have one layer of anti-reflective coating applied to each surface of the glass.

"Also, this does not address the loss of sharpness or focus shift, which can have a noticeable detrimental impact on picture quality.
For these reasons, Hoya multi-coated filters present the best value on the market today. "


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Aug 17, 2012 18:30 |  #29

Personally, I would stay away from the Hoya CPL's. Too many stories of them falling apart, and from what I read, nearly impossible to put back together. Add to this lack of support from Hoya when this happens, makes them a no go in my book.

The Marumi generally get excellent reviews and will probably be my choice if I ever require another one. I've seen rare instances here, like previously linked, of that blue cast, but for the life of me I can't understand why it didn't show up in the lenstip reivew.

Currently I have a B+W KSM and a much older B+W which I think is single coated. Really, I'm going to have to compare them one day, but in normal use, I haven't seen any difference in the images. Only in rare instances, I think, does the extra coating make any difference. I certainly think the lower cost B+W's are an excellent choice for someone who is on a budget.

I would consider getting a 77mm size with a step up ring to have greater compatablity with Canon's other lenses (maybe even an 82mm if the new 24-70 is in your future). You will need to buy a 77mm hood if you do this.


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Aug 17, 2012 18:40 |  #30

i-G12 wrote in post #14863392 (external link)
Well even with the price difference I'm kinda leaning towards the B + W Kaesemann Circular Polarizer MRC Filter from most I've read. I do appreciate all the comments though and am still reading more about the different brands. Hoya seems to be in last place right now. Kinda bothers me when camera stores push things on you only because that is what they stock.

Now the question is wether the "slim" model is that paramount. It's going on a 15-85 which isn't super wide and a lot of folks tell me it's not going to be a problem with vignetting using the stand size. I don't know though. I also heard/read that the slim variety is problematic with getting lens caps on an off so I'd prefer not to have that hassle. Again I'm new at this and just don't know how important the slim would or wouldn't be.

I can't speak to the others because I haven't shot with them, but the Kaesemann is the CPL that I wound up with and I wouldn't even hesitate to recommend it. It's a well-built piece of gear, stands up to regular, frequent use, is easy to clean and gives great results.

Also, for the 15-85, the slim model is not necessary; I use the standard model all the way out to 10mm without any vignetting.

Just as a straight CPL, I prefer it over the much more expensive Vari-N-Duo that I own; which may be getting retired too, now that I've gotten my mitts on a Big Stopper :p


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