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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 21 Feb 2013 (Thursday) 10:55
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Jupiter and Io 18-02-2013/ 19-02-2013

 
Viffer
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Feb 21, 2013 10:55 |  #1

I've been looking (and working) at my Jupiter data from the 18th. Monday the 18th was the first proper outing for the DBK camera and, I was experimenting with different codec to set the camera for colour recording. Alas, once I worked out how to do it (record in RAW and Debayer in Registax) the sky conditions had deteriorated.

It became crystal clear again latter on in the early hours of the morning but, by then, my front corrector was frozen solid and imaging was all but impossible. Still, I managed a fantastic picture of Saturn. (see other thread).

Now, as all who live in London knows, great viewing conditions like we had on the 18th are very rare and far between. But, now I have cracked the technique (and the darned camera) I can't wait for the conditions to return.

Below Io's transit of Jupiter taken on the 18th Feb 2013 at 17:59h GMT (to date, the best image I have managed of the planet)

Celestron CGEMDX 11HD, Tele-Vue 2x Power-Mate, DBK 21 AU 618 + Astonomic IR filter. Processed with Pipp, registax and Photoshop CS6.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


Below, what I managed the next day (colour this time)
Taken with a Celestron CGEMDX 11HD, Televue Power-mate 2x and, DBK21 camera without IR filter on the night of the 19th feb 2013 @ 20:42h GMT. Processed with pipp, regitax 6 and photoshop cs6. High altitude Cirrostratus affected image quality but, I am happy with the feel and atmosphere of the image.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE



  
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04yellowf150
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Feb 21, 2013 11:37 |  #2

awesome images, I also have an edge, but its a baby(8inch) compared to yours lol. How are you liking your scope?


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Celestron
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Feb 21, 2013 21:37 |  #3

Viffer wrote in post #15635927 (external link)
I've been looking (and working) at my Jupiter data from the 18th. Monday the 18th was the first proper outing for the DBK camera and, I was experimenting with different codec to set the camera for colour recording. Alas, once I worked out how to do it (record in RAW and Debayer in Registax) the sky conditions had deteriorated.

It became crystal clear again latter on in the early hours of the morning but, by then, my front corrector was frozen solid and imaging was all but impossible. Still, I managed a fantastic picture of Saturn. (see other thread).

Now, as all who live in London knows, great viewing conditions like we had on the 18th are very rare and far between. But, now I have cracked the technique (and the darned camera) I can't wait for the conditions to return.

Below Io's transit of Jupiter taken on the 18th Feb 2013 at 17:59h GMT (to date, the best image I have managed of the planet)

Celestron CGEMDX 11HD, Tele-Vue 2x Power-Mate, DBK 21 AU 618 + Astonomic IR filter. Processed with Pipp, registax and Photoshop CS6.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
| Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


Below, what I managed the next day (colour this time)
Taken with a Celestron CGEMDX 11HD, Televue Power-mate 2x and, DBK21 camera without IR filter on the night of the 19th feb 2013 @ 20:42h GMT. Processed with pipp, regitax 6 and photoshop cs6. High altitude Cirrostratus affected image quality but, I am happy with the feel and atmosphere of the image.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
| Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE

You did very very good and congrats on the capture . However i like the B&W image best because the image has better more clear detail of the bands than the color image . The color image looks like it's soft and the band details are not as sharp and details . Keep them coming tho !

04yellowf150 wrote in post #15636082 (external link)
awesome images, I also have an edge, but its a baby(8inch) compared to yours lol. How are you liking your scope?

Be proud of it cause you can still get the same image as the 11" only on a smaller basis . I have had a Celestron C8 SCT 8" since 1997 and it has been the best scope i have had . I got the Stellarvue Tank original AT1010 and i have had a meade refractor and a Bushnell Reflector 5" if i remember correctly and the Celestron is my best one .




  
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Viffer
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Feb 22, 2013 09:23 |  #4

Thank you guys for the kind comments.
@ Celestron:
The second image was taken the next evening. Sadly, high altitude cirrostratus and adverse conditions in the atmosphere's sodium layer had a negative effect on image quality. Also, I took the image without an infrared filter which, makes focusing even harder and, gave the image a pinkish tint.
When it comes to planetary images, focusing and atmospheric conditions are the main factors on how your image will turn up.

All factors considered, I am pretty happy with both images :)




  
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Celestron
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Feb 22, 2013 10:37 |  #5

Viffer wrote in post #15639697 (external link)
Thank you guys for the kind comments.
@ Celestron:
The second image was taken the next evening. Sadly, high altitude cirrostratus and adverse conditions in the atmosphere's sodium layer had a negative effect on image quality. Also, I took the image without an infrared filter which, makes focusing even harder and, gave the image a pinkish tint.
When it comes to planetary images, focusing and atmospheric conditions are the main factors on how your image will turn up.

All factors considered, I am pretty happy with both images :)


Other words lousy atmospheric conditions produce a lousy image . I've alway understood that condition with the area you live in . That's why i'm also a member of the UK Astroimaging Forum . They have great planet pictures . Some of the best i have ever seen especially in the sky condition your talking about . Check it out if you don't know about it :

http://ukastroimaging.​co.uk/forums/ (external link)




  
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vschapman
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Feb 22, 2013 11:41 |  #6

Very nice, I love the color one!


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Viffer
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Feb 22, 2013 13:46 |  #7

Thank you Vs chapman :).
Celestron, the best planetary images are those taken by Mr Damian Peach (external link) Simply put, the guy takes the best terrestial based pictures of the planets in our solar system! :cool:
That's the kind of quality I am very much after and, I won't rest until (at the very least) I manage to equal it! :)




  
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Celestron
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Feb 22, 2013 17:01 |  #8

Viffer wrote in post #15640658 (external link)
Thank you Vs chapman :).
Celestron, the best planetary images are those taken by Mr Damian Peach (external link) Simply put, the guy takes the best terrestial based pictures of the planets in our solar system! :cool:
That's the kind of quality I am very much after and, I won't rest until (at the very least) I manage to equal it! :)


Well i guess if you use the very exact same equipment and software and he has trained you well then you will be there in no time ! ;)




  
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Viffer
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Feb 24, 2013 21:34 |  #9

Celestron wrote in post #15641403 (external link)
Well i guess if you use the very exact same equipment and software and he has trained you well then you will be there in no time ! ;)

Celestron, I like to work things out by myself and, I will probably get there without his help. Having said that, Mr Peach is a master of planetary imagining and, if he was to offer "training", I would be a crazy man to turn it down! ;)
As for the equipment, I do long for a 14-16" (I can easily afford them) but, my 11" HD is as much as my old bones can handle.




  
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ronmayhew
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Feb 24, 2013 23:02 |  #10

love it!


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Celestron
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Feb 25, 2013 07:52 |  #11

Viffer wrote in post #15648567 (external link)
Celestron, I like to work things out by myself and, I will probably get there without his help.


I really really hope you do cause if you do you alone will finally prove you can do anything if you set your mind to it and did it with a DBK camera !! I look forward to your equal to image of Mr.Peaches fantastic images !




  
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Viffer
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Feb 25, 2013 08:25 |  #12

Celestron wrote in post #15649494 (external link)
I really really hope you do cause if you do you alone will finally prove you can do anything if you set your mind to it and did it with a DBK camera !! I look forward to your equal to image of Mr.Peaches fantastic images !

Well, Mr Peach did it and, I don't se why anyone wouldn't be able to, at the very least, match him. In fact Martin Lewis (external link) is getting very close indeed with a home built Dobsonian scope.

Mr Peach uses a point Grey flea 3 camera which I have on order so, in that respect, the only thing he has an advantage on is aperture (14" as opposed to my 11") and clear skies. The letter I can seek and match (time permitting) the former I could easily buy but, I am old and I don't have (nor do I want) a permanent observatory so, a 14" scope would be unmanageable for me.

Now, due to his scope resolving down to 0.32 arc seconds and the fact mine only resolves to 0.41, I will never be able to get the very fine details with my scope. But, I should be able to get very very close. :)




  
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Feb 25, 2013 12:20 |  #13

Viffer wrote in post #15649565 (external link)
Now, due to his scope resolving down to 0.32 arc seconds and the fact mine only resolves to 0.41, I will never be able to get the very fine details with my scope.

BINGO !!




  
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Viffer
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Feb 25, 2013 12:55 |  #14

Celestron wrote in post #15650301 (external link)
BINGO !!

HA... got you!!!


You see, when it comes to planetary imagining Dawes resolving power is irrelevant.
The figures I gave you above (0.41 and 0.32) are criterion figures for the separation of binary stars of equal brightness in unobstructed apertures.

The Dawes limit is really of little use for Planetary, as it applies to stellar images. Planetary detail behaves quite differently, and the resolution that can be achieved is directly related to the contrast of the objects we are looking at.

For instance, the Encke division in the A ring of Saturn has an apparent angular width of just 0.05 arc second which according to Dawes not even a 20" scope would be able to resolve. Yet, under excellent viewing conditions, an 8" scope can resolve this division.

As mentioned, contrast of the planets features is critical to how fine the detail is that we can record. The Planets are extended objects, and the Dawes or Rayleigh criterion does not apply here as these limits refers to point sources of equal brightness on a black background. In fact, it is possible for the limit to be exceeded anywhere up to around ten times on the Moon and Planets depending on the contrast of the detail being imaged.

You see under excellent viewing condition anyone with an 8" scope (or larger) can match the details that Mr Peach is able to achieve. Albeit, the disk will be quite a bit smaller!

bw!




  
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Celestron
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Feb 25, 2013 14:19 |  #15

Viffer wrote in post #15650426 (external link)
HA... got you!!!


You see, when it comes to planetary imagining Dawes resolving power is irrelevant.
The figures I gave you above (0.41 and 0.32) are criterion figures for the separation of binary stars of equal brightness in unobstructed apertures.

The Dawes limit is really of little use for Planetary, as it applies to stellar images. Planetary detail behaves quite differently, and the resolution that can be achieved is directly related to the contrast of the objects we are looking at.

For instance, the Encke division in the A ring of Saturn has an apparent angular width of just 0.05 arc second which according to Dawes not even a 20" scope would be able to resolve. Yet, under excellent viewing conditions, an 8" scope can resolve this division.

As mentioned, contrast of the planets features is critical to how fine the detail is that we can record. The Planets are extended objects, and the Dawes or Rayleigh criterion does not apply here as these limits refers to point sources of equal brightness on a black background. In fact, it is possible for the limit to be exceeded anywhere up to around ten times on the Moon and Planets depending on the contrast of the detail being imaged.

You see under excellent viewing condition anyone with an 8" scope (or larger) can match the details that Mr Peach is able to achieve. Albeit, the disk will be quite a bit smaller!

bw!

Naw... you didn't get anything ;) . I been playing you all along and you never caught on to it . Only reason i even played you cause you believe you could produce an image as well as Peachys' image while the images you did produce came no where close to his images . And besides that there have been many other images produced by amateurs that are equal or better than his images . You put him up on a pedestal only to have it knocked out from under him . I don't think he would like that if he knew you were doing so . I've seen images as good as his taken by a Philips 740k webcam . So keep on doing what you been doing or just wise up and either produce a compareable image to Peachys' like you say you can and will or just take images and post and hope people like them ... ;) . Have a great day .......

BTW , heres the celestron images site . I think you'll find many there , even jupiter that will compare to Peachys' :

http://www.celestronim​ages.com/ (external link)




  
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Jupiter and Io 18-02-2013/ 19-02-2013
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