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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing
Thread started 09 Jun 2009 (Tuesday) 11:33
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STICKY: Why Color Management?

 
René ­ Damkot
THREAD ­ STARTER
Cream of the Crop
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enschede, netherlands
Oct 19, 2012 04:15 |  #16

QTran0320 wrote in post #15139885external link
Jpg, Tiff?? and with proof color turn on in photoshop and ymck color checked?

jpg. When in doubt: sRGB.
"Proof colors" in PS only affects what you see. It has no effect on the files.

Soft proofing only makes sense if you have the printers profile.

Don't ever use CMYK (unless you prepare work for offset press. And even then, the CMYK conversion is not (should not be) your job).


"I think the idea of art kills creativity" - Douglas Adams
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dmward
Cream of the Crop
Joined Jun 2009
Metro Chicago
Nov 22, 2012 09:23 |  #17

My experience has been that labs have two options when ordering prints, "Lab Corrected Color" or "User Corrected Color". Each lab will have its own terms. The difference is that for LCC the lab tech running the image through their printer will take a quick swipe at "getting the color right" regardless of what you may have done within your own color managed workflow. The UCC option means they don't mess with the file.

I always opt for the UCC approach. I also send a set of test files to the lab to make sure they are going to provide me what I expect. This approach allows me to have several labs available that will deliver a print that is the same as a print from another lab. Even with different papers.

Good color management starts in the camera and continues through your processing and preparing the file for printing. René has some good information accessible via link in his signature block.


David | Sharing my Insights, Knowledge & Experience (external link) | dmwfotos website (external link)

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DonUnder
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Jul 15, 2013 23:27 |  #18

Unless you are printing your own photos or using a lab that you 100% trust to be using the correct profiles then calibration is a waste of time.

When you consider that 99.9% of digital photos never get viewed on anything other than an uncalibrated device, I've never really understood how anal people who never print get about this subject.


http://500px.com/dmaca​ulay75external link

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tonylong
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Jul 17, 2013 16:39 |  #19

DonUnder wrote in post #16124016external link
Unless you are printing your own photos or using a lab that you 100% trust to be using the correct profiles then calibration is a waste of time.

When you consider that 99.9% of digital photos never get viewed on anything other than an uncalibrated device, I've never really understood how anal people who never print get about this subject.

Well, you do have valid points to consider, but then the folks who pop up here typically have questions/issues that have to do with printing as well as "strange" experiences when viewing their photos in different places with different "gear", and so some rudimentary understanding of color management practices and variables does come into play!


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
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DonUnder
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Jul 17, 2013 19:49 |  #20

Don't get me wrong, I do think it is important to know about colour management and why images look different on different displays but I have come across people to spend a couple of hundred dollars on a calibration device and buy massively expensive wide gamut displays and then only ever show their work on Flickr and 500px.

If your final medium is print then calibration isn't just recommended, it is vital.


http://500px.com/dmaca​ulay75external link

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René ­ Damkot
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Jul 18, 2013 14:19 |  #21

DonUnder wrote in post #16124016external link
Unless you are printing your own photos or using a lab that you 100% trust to be using the correct profiles then calibration is a waste of time.

When you consider that 99.9% of digital photos never get viewed on anything other than an uncalibrated device, I've never really understood how anal people who never print get about this subject.

Well, it's the only way to know you are editing an image to something you want…
If your display is (for instance) way too blue, you will edit all your images too warm to compensate.
They will look good on your screen, but likely not on a whole lot of other screens, and certainly not on my, calibrated, screen ;)


"I think the idea of art kills creativity" - Douglas Adams
Why Color Management.
Color Problems? Click here.
MySpaceexternal link
Get Colormanagedexternal link
Twitterexternal link
PERSONAL MESSAGING REGARDING SELLING OR BUYING ITEMS WITH MEMBERS WHO HAVE NO POSTS IN FORUMS AND/OR WHO YOU DO NOT KNOW FROM FORUMS IS HEREBY DECLARED STRICTLY STUPID AND YOU WILL GET BURNED.

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RandMan
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Boston, MA
Jul 22, 2013 19:23 |  #22

DonUnder wrote in post #16124016external link
Unless you are printing your own photos or using a lab that you 100% trust to be using the correct profiles then calibration is a waste of time.

When you consider that 99.9% of digital photos never get viewed on anything other than an uncalibrated device, I've never really understood how anal people who never print get about this subject.

René Damkot wrote in post #16132151external link
Well, it's the only way to know you are editing an image to something you want…
If your display is (for instance) way too blue, you will edit all your images too warm to compensate.
They will look good on your screen, but likely not on a whole lot of other screens, and certainly not on my, calibrated, screen ;)

Below is a link to a thread from a couple of months ago. The o.p. had worked on thousands of images for years on a tremendously uncalibrated monitor. Then he purchased a spiffy new monitor and was dumbfounded to find that it made all of his pictures look really messed up. He was compensating all along just like Rene mentioned, and everything always looked fine to him because his editing did not exist outside of him and his own personal monitor. If you read through the thread, his unfortunate solution is that he now needs to go back and re-edit his thousands of images on a correctly-calibrated monitor, so that he never has to go through that again. Crappy price to pay if you ask me!
http://photography-on-the.net .../showthread.php?t=1​304105


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tzalman
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Gesher Haziv, Israel
Jul 23, 2013 05:33 |  #23

DonUnder wrote in post #16129777external link
Don't get me wrong, I do think it is important to know about colour management and why images look different on different displays but I have come across people to spend a couple of hundred dollars on a calibration device and buy massively expensive wide gamut displays and then only ever show their work on Flickr and 500px.

A couple years ago there was a post from a guy asking for help using his new camera. He related that he had gone into a camera shop (in Miami I think it was) and asked for the best gear they had. The clerk, with dollar signs dancing in his eyes, sold him a 1DsMkIII (about $8,000 at the time), a bag full of L lenses, their best Manfrotto tripod and a 580 EX flash. Now the guy wanted to know how to take some snapshots of his current girlfriend. When outraged (and envious) members pointed out that the camera was overkill, that the selection of lenses had focal length overlaps and that he had wasted his money, the reply was, "Hey, I've got plenty of money and everything I buy - cars, women and everything else - is the best." And those same members were forced to admit that, despite their envy, they had no grounds for objections.

If people are buying expensive gear because they have been misled to believe that without it their photos will be inadequate, that is wrong. If they are buying it because the expense is not a problem and they want to have the best possessions their means will accommodate, they have the right to echo the words of the song, "'Tain't nobody's business but my own."


Elie / אלי

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tonylong
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Jul 24, 2013 20:40 |  #24

Eli, that was a good point! 'Course there was a time when I could afford pretty expensive gear, now, well, at least I still have some of it to play with!:)


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
Tony Long Photos on PBaseexternal link
Wildlife project pics hereexternal link, Biking Photog shoots hereexternal link, "Suburbia" project hereexternal link! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics hereexternal link

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