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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre People Talk
Thread started 23 Apr 2015 (Thursday) 22:29
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Very emotional day

 
Conradebner
Senior Member
Joined Jun 2012
The South
Apr 23, 2015 22:29 |  #1

I remember seeing when the Boston Marathon bombing occurred and seeing all the photographs immediately after the explosion. People crying out for help and thousands of photographs of people bleeding, stunned, dying. I wondered, did the photographer ever stop taking pics and help the injured. Today, I was shooting a high school baseball game. It was between a double header and I looked over my shoulder and noticed a cyclist had appeared to have crashed on the bike trail behind me. I didn't think anything of it, it appeared he was moving and there was a runner assisting him, I instinctively,shot a pic. It wasn't a minute latter that I saw the baseball coach running over to the cyclist. I paused and immediately handed my camera setup to a lady Next to me, and hauled ass over there. By the time I got there, less than 20 seconds, we were doing CPR. It seemed like forever before fire and paramedics made it there. The whole time we were there, we got not pulse, paramedics shocked him once (fing equipment failure) and resumed CPR. They couldn't get him intabated, so they kept with the bag. They loaded him up in the ambulance and off they went.

I am not sure why, but I have to post this, there is a tremendous load of guilt I am experiencing. What if I had gone over there instead of taking that pic, gone immediately, would it have mattered? Assisting someone in need was surpassed by photography in that instant. Hindsight is 20/20, he was blue when we got there, but maybe he wasn't to far gone a minute earlier. I saw the pic when I was editing my images and almost started crying. Don't let photography separate you from the life that is around you.
Thanks for listening!


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Road ­ Dog
Senior Member
Joined Jul 2014
St. Augustine, Florida
Apr 24, 2015 00:39 |  #2

Look, man, you can't know everything, you can't help everyone and hindsight is always 20/20.

I'm gonna' guess you did a lot more than most people there. Take solace in that...


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Alveric
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Joined Jan 2011
Canada
Post has been edited over 2 years ago by Alveric.
Apr 24, 2015 00:59 |  #3

There's a difference betwixt 'instinctively' and 'distinctly'.

Reflex action –that one shot– before the higher mind kicks in and calls you to duty. No fault or sin there, mate, so don't get yourself all worked up with unnecessary and uncalled-for guilt.

Had you made the fully conscious decision to continue shooting, to look for alternate angles, or gone even to the extent of hampering the people giving aid and/or causing greater pain to the suffering cyclist, it would have been a very different matter: in that case you'd be fully culpable.


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OhLook
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Apr 24, 2015 11:35 |  #4

Alveric wrote in post #17530302external link
Reflex action –that one shot– before the higher mind kicks in and calls you to duty. No fault or sin there, mate, so don't get yourself all worked up with unnecessary and uncalled-for guilt.

This is about the same as what I'd planned to say. You were primed for shooting. It took a few seconds for your brain to switch into emergency mode. Then you had to decide what to do. I was in a similar situation once, involving a fire that broke out suddenly. First you realize what's happening, then you plan to act. It does take time.

Wondering whether you could have helped the man more if you'd got there sooner won't be useful. Other people reached him before you did, and their efforts were no more effective than yours. It seems that the result of the combined efforts is unknown, since the paramedics took him away.


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Conradebner
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Joined Jun 2012
The South
Apr 24, 2015 18:02 |  #5

The man did not make it. He was a Madison Co sheriff Officer. There were many cops who showed up during the time I was there, not typical response officers. A cop friend of mine on FB changed his profile pic to the black stripe on the badge. I called and talked to him, and he told me he was an investigator and also worked with FBI cypher crimes unit. He died riding his bike, something he loved doing.

Thanks for your responses, I really appreciate it.

Conrad


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Jules ­ Winnfield ­ 2517
Junior Member
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May 14, 2015 22:21 as a reply to Conradebner's post |  #6

These types of situations are always upsetting.

The fact is, the vast majority of people who receive CPR do not survive. CPR is done for the small percentage of patients who recover. It is unlikely that arriving a few seconds or a minute earlier would have made any difference in the outcome.

I have been in similar siuations, and having that experience certainly makes you more aware of the possibilities in the future. Next time, you will rush over and the cyclist will jump up, push you aside and wonder why you're making such a fuss. And that's okay. Someday, there will be a person in need who benefits from your experience.




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Intheswamp
Goldmember
Joined Sep 2013
South Alabama
May 14, 2015 22:50 |  #7

Conrad, we have a family business. My desk and my brother's are side-by-side and our chairs probably seven or eight feet apart. Back in 2001, two days after Christmas my brother was talking on the phone with a customer. He got quiet. I looked over and he was reaching to pick up a pen he'd dropped on the floor. I went back to doing what I had been doing but something made me look back at him. He wasn't reaching for a pen. I ran over and leaned him back in his chair. Something was terribly wrong. I hung up on the person he'd been talking to and dialed 911. I then picked him up and laid him on the floor and began CPR. Our business is in a very small town, maybe 3,000 people, and we grew up here, there was no question about the address and the paramedic station was only a couple of blocks away. The paramedics arrived in just a couple of minutes and rushed him to the hospital. While waiting for a report from inside the actual emergency room I asked one of the paramedics if they ever got a pulse...they said they didn't. The doctor came out a minute or two later to tell us my brother had died. Had my brother been in the best equipped ER with the best trained doctors and surgeons he still would have died...his time here on earth was over with and nothing could've changed that. I've seconded-guessed myself on whether I did something wrong as I never got a response from him prior to the paramedics arriving. But, truthfully, I know he was gone even before I took him in my arms.

You took a photo of an accident, one that most of the time would have been minor. You didn't continue to shoot the situation but you *did* offer your help once you realized the situation was more than minor. There is no foul in what you did, rather you should be commended for coming to the aid of your fellow man. To offer aid and comfort to another human first you must leave your own comfort zone...and that you did.

You will always remember this incident, tragedies like this tend to stick with us. But also remember that you *did* offer aid and comfort....you exhibited a wonderful human characteristic....comp​assion.

Ed


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Conradebner
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Joined Jun 2012
The South
May 19, 2015 21:09 as a reply to Intheswamp's post |  #8

Thanks Ed, and sorry for your loss. You are right, I will remember it. It occurred right outside my daughter school and I drive by there every day.


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ksbal
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N.E. Kansas
Post has been edited over 2 years ago by ksbal.
Jun 04, 2015 15:14 |  #9

Alveric wrote in post #17530302external link
There's a difference betwixt 'instinctively' and 'distinctly'.

Reflex action –that one shot– before the higher mind kicks in and calls you to duty. No fault or sin there, mate, so don't get yourself all worked up with unnecessary and uncalled-for guilt.

Had you made the fully conscious decision to continue shooting, to look for alternate angles, or gone even to the extent of hampering the people giving aid and/or causing greater pain to the suffering cyclist, it would have been a very different matter: in that case you'd be fully culpable.

Alveric has it right, I'm sure you won't hear this enough, but you did nothing wrong, and everything right at that moment for the information you had. Many other people may have looked over and saw what you saw, and didn't look back for a while as well.. they just don't have a picture to show for it. Are they guilty? I don't think so.


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elrey2375
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Jun 04, 2015 20:23 |  #10

And you have to understand that those people were doing their job. Being a race, there were plenty of EMT personnel and they did their job as well. Don't feel bad, though.


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