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FORUMS General Gear Talk Tripods, Monopods & Other Camera Support
Thread started 14 Aug 2015 (Friday) 18:29
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Looking for a high-quality tripod

 
davewolfs
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Post has been last edited over 2 years ago by davewolfs. 2 edits done in total.
Aug 20, 2015 20:00 |  #46

Markins makes the best heads in my opinion. The Arca Swiss P0 is also a nice head. I've never liked the RRS BH40 and the BH55 is too big.

In my opinion traveller tripods really kick ass since they are light and sturdy. 2 series tripods are a compromise between weight and rigidness. Three series tripods are outright rigid but also a pain in the ass to carry.

You want light get a 1 series traveller. If you can't have two tripods get a 2 series regular or traveller. If you can afford both buy a 1 series and get a 3 series when you actually put a 300 2.8 on it.

I used to own a 2 series and now I own a 1 series traveller. I love it because it's light enough to take anywhere. A lot of this comes down to how you plan to shoot eg getting on planes, going for hikes or just getting out of your car. Don't go overkill with respect to size.




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corndog ­ cabernet
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Aug 26, 2015 14:54 |  #47

CyberDyneSystems wrote in post #17675569 (external link)
Frankly, for many years the best legs were made by Gitzo and the best heads made by any of a number of US and Swiss manufactures that did not make legs.

It is only in fairly recent memory that RRS began making legs, and Gitzo heads are sort of 2nd class.


It remains true today that on MOST cases you will get a better head leg combo buying different brands (Induro legs for instance, fantastic, but you'd be better off with a Sirui head!)

I'd go 3 series Gitzo (have in fact twice) with leveling column, and RRS, Markins, Acratech or Kirk head.


davewolfs wrote in post #17676966 (external link)
Markins makes the best heads in my opinion. The Arca Swiss P0 is also a nice head. I've never liked the RRS BH40 and the BH55 is too big.

In my opinion traveller tripods really kick ass since they are light and sturdy. 2 series tripods are a compromise between weight and rigidness. Three series tripods are outright rigid but also a pain in the ass to carry.

You want light get a 1 series traveller. If you can't have two tripods get a 2 series regular or traveller. If you can afford both buy a 1 series and get a 3 series when you actually put a 300 2.8 on it.

I used to own a 2 series and now I own a 1 series traveller. I love it because it's light enough to take anywhere. A lot of this comes down to how you plan to shoot eg getting on planes, going for hikes or just getting out of your car. Don't go overkill with respect to size.

To the OP,
You can spend your $1000-1500 if you want, but I think it's largely a waste of money. Like most material things, there is a point reached of diminishing returns. In the case of tripods and heads, the drop is very steep after the peak of the curve.
If I were buying another tripod today, it would be Induro Carbon Legs with a Markins head, sized to suit my needs. I currently have a Benro C158-M6 carbon tripod with a Markins Q3 on it and it is just excellent but Benro doesn't make tripods with collets anymore, Induro does. I much prefer collet type leg clamps as I think they make stiffer joints and are low profile.




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Charlie
Guess What! I'm Pregnant!
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Aug 26, 2015 17:01 |  #48

corndog cabernet wrote in post #17683920 (external link)
To the OP,
You can spend your $1000-1500 if you want, but I think it's largely a waste of money. Like most material things, there is a point reached of diminishing returns. In the case of tripods and heads, the drop is very steep after the peak of the curve.
If I were buying another tripod today, it would be Induro Carbon Legs with a Markins head, sized to suit my needs. I currently have a Benro C158-M6 carbon tripod with a Markins Q3 on it and it is just excellent but Benro doesn't make tripods with collets anymore, Induro does. I much prefer collet type leg clamps as I think they make stiffer joints and are low profile.

you can really say the same about carbon vs aluminum tripods, or the q3 vs cheapo sirui.

I wouldnt pay for RRS, but the resale value of the items tend to be really good, so it's not a total loss. There is a value in what you pay, and you can get a lot of it back if you decide it's not for you. Fairly solid investment if you ask me. Gitzo as well, I sold off a series 3 for a good amount of money, more than the induros and benros of the world.

The gitzo I owned previously turned out to be the most solid tripod investment I ever had, used it for a few years, then sold for a profit....... it's not all bad news when it comes to high end gear.


Sony A7rii/A7riii - FE 12-24/4 - FE 24-240 - FE 28/2 - FE 35/2.8 - CV 35/1.7 - FE 50/1.8 - FE 85/1.8 - EF 135/1.8 Art - F 600/5.6 - CZ 35-70, 100-300 - Astro Rok 14/2.8, 24/1.4 - Tamron 28-75 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8 VC

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corndog ­ cabernet
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Post has been edited over 2 years ago by corndog cabernet.
Aug 26, 2015 17:07 |  #49

Charlie wrote in post #17684072 (external link)
you can really say the same about carbon vs aluminum tripods, or the q3 vs cheapo sirui.

I wouldnt pay for RRS, but the resale value of the items tend to be really good, so it's not a total loss. There is a value in what you pay, and you can get a lot of it back if you decide it's not for you. Fairly solid investment if you ask me. Gitzo as well, I sold off a series 3 for a good amount of money, more than the induros and benros of the world.

The gitzo I owned previously turned out to be the most solid tripod investment I ever had, used it for a few years, then sold for a profit....... it's not all bad news when it comes to high end gear.

You make a good point, and I guess it depends on subjective opinion as to where the peak of the curve exists. I do agree that good equipment holds it's value better than lesser goods.
Usually the best value is far from the least expensive.




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Van ­ Gogh
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Post has been edited over 2 years ago by Van Gogh.
Aug 26, 2015 17:47 |  #50

corndog cabernet wrote in post #17683920 (external link)
To the OP,
You can spend your $1000-1500 if you want, but I think it's largely a waste of money. Like most material things, there is a point reached of diminishing returns. In the case of tripods and heads, the drop is very steep after the peak of the curve.
If I were buying another tripod today, it would be Induro Carbon Legs with a Markins head, sized to suit my needs. I currently have a Benro C158-M6 carbon tripod with a Markins Q3 on it and it is just excellent but Benro doesn't make tripods with collets anymore, Induro does. I much prefer collet type leg clamps as I think they make stiffer joints and are low profile.

I absolutely understand what you say and I agree with you 100%.
It is just that the tripod I am going to buy now I will probably use for literally a lifetime, and as funds currently allow me to, why not go for the "nicer" toy  :p


Camera - 2x5Dmk3, C100 mkii, 70D, 60D
Lenses - 24-70mm f2.8L II, 70-200mm f2.8L IS ii, 85mm f1.2L II, 35mm f1.4 ART, 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS
Lighting - 3 x 600EX RT's, Printer - Epson 3880
Website - http://www.shotlifestu​dio.com/ (external link)

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Charlie
Guess What! I'm Pregnant!
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Aug 26, 2015 18:13 as a reply to Van Gogh's post |  #51

hate to burst your bubble, but a tripod that lasts you a lifetime is like a lens that will last a lifetime. Sure it can work, but you may change habits. My brother for instance, bought the TVC45 + BH55 + panning clamp, somewhere in the neighborhood of 1600, absolute monster of a tripod...... way too heavy to go hiking or travel. His second RRS tripod, over 1K, TVC24 + BH40..... a seriously good combo, and sufficient for even his largest lens, a 200/2. At this point, he's gone through 3 tripods.

I on the other hand, have used bogen, manfrotto, gitzo, and feisol, all solid kits. Bogen, slow to setup, but very solid. Manfrotto xprob with center column removal, faster to setup, but kinda heavy. Gitzo systematic, tall, super stable, and lighter than the manfrotto. Lastly, feisol, tall enough, stable enough, and super light and compact. I havent sold the feisol, and dont plan to, but resale value for all these branded tripods have held up very well. All really stable tripods that could definitely last forever, however, opinions change. Started hiking more, aiming for lighter gear, so that's where I ended up. I'm very happy with my kit fwiw, it's just so enjoyable to use, and that's a long time of joy, but lifetime, probably not :twisted:


Sony A7rii/A7riii - FE 12-24/4 - FE 24-240 - FE 28/2 - FE 35/2.8 - CV 35/1.7 - FE 50/1.8 - FE 85/1.8 - EF 135/1.8 Art - F 600/5.6 - CZ 35-70, 100-300 - Astro Rok 14/2.8, 24/1.4 - Tamron 28-75 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8 VC

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Van ­ Gogh
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Aug 26, 2015 20:48 |  #52

Charlie wrote in post #17684155 (external link)
hate to burst your bubble, but a tripod that lasts you a lifetime is like a lens that will last a lifetime. Sure it can work, but you may change habits. My brother for instance, bought the TVC45 + BH55 + panning clamp, somewhere in the neighborhood of 1600, absolute monster of a tripod...... way too heavy to go hiking or travel. His second RRS tripod, over 1K, TVC24 + BH40..... a seriously good combo, and sufficient for even his largest lens, a 200/2. At this point, he's gone through 3 tripods.

I on the other hand, have used bogen, manfrotto, gitzo, and feisol, all solid kits. Bogen, slow to setup, but very solid. Manfrotto xprob with center column removal, faster to setup, but kinda heavy. Gitzo systematic, tall, super stable, and lighter than the manfrotto. Lastly, feisol, tall enough, stable enough, and super light and compact. I havent sold the feisol, and dont plan to, but resale value for all these branded tripods have held up very well. All really stable tripods that could definitely last forever, however, opinions change. Started hiking more, aiming for lighter gear, so that's where I ended up. I'm very happy with my kit fwiw, it's just so enjoyable to use, and that's a long time of joy, but lifetime, probably not :twisted:

Haha in the back of my mind I know that you are probably right  :p


Camera - 2x5Dmk3, C100 mkii, 70D, 60D
Lenses - 24-70mm f2.8L II, 70-200mm f2.8L IS ii, 85mm f1.2L II, 35mm f1.4 ART, 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS
Lighting - 3 x 600EX RT's, Printer - Epson 3880
Website - http://www.shotlifestu​dio.com/ (external link)

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Phoenixkh
a mere speck
Joined May 2011
Gainesville, Florida
Aug 26, 2015 22:18 |  #53

I added a few things to my RRS tripod. I can now use it with a gimbal or a ball head. Change over takes about 15 seconds, give or take. Plus, I haul my stuff around on a shotgun cart from Rugged Gear... so weigh isn't an issue. The hiking here is on mostly level trails so it works for me.


Kim (the male variety) Canon 1D IV | 6Dc | 16-35 f/4 IS | 24-105 f/4 IS |100L IS macro | 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II | 100-400Lii | 50 f/1.8 STM | Canon 1.4X III
RRS tripod and monopod | 580EXII | Cinch 1 & Loop 3 Special Edition

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rgs
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Post has been edited over 2 years ago by rgs.
Aug 26, 2015 23:25 |  #54

A couple of suggestions that I hope have not been made already.

1. Some have suggested getting a somewhat lighter tripod unless you seriously plan to purchase the 300 in the near future. I'm going to agree with that. A really big, heavy tripod has the disadvantage of discouraging it's use because of it's size. Get a more normal sized tripod that you will be eager to use. Then, when you get the 300, get a wooden tripod to use with the 300. Wooden tripods are heavy and a bit clumsy, but they are also capable of holding great weight and wood damps vibrations better than ANY tripod material including CF. If it's just for use with a large, long lens, the tripod's size and weight will not be an issue. And it will be much cheaper than a CF mega-pod. Mine (rarely used since my view camera is rarely used anymore) made for me by a woodworker/photogrpahe​r friend. It has mohogany legs and a paduk base. It's beautiful but heavy and very solid.

2. Ball heads are most popular and may well be your choice. But, if you want to make frequent fine adjustments to camera position, take a look at geared heads. They are slower to use, heavy and big but you can put the camera precisely where you want it without fail. The Manfrotto 410 Junior (external link) is the most common one and is not too expensive. If you want to spend more there are a couple of very nice Arca-Swiss models.

3. One final point. Rather than try to get around your Black Rapid, perhaps take a look at the Peak Design Slide. It does not work the same way as the BR (the whole strap slides instead of the connector) but it does the same thing without disabling the tripod socket and, because it is a 2 point connection instead of single point, the camera is more stable and doesn't twist and dangle.

Hope these help you think through this. It's an important purchase. Best of luck with it.


Canon 7d MkII, Canon 50D, Pentax 67, Canon 30D, Baker Custom 4x5, Canon EF 24-104mm f4, Canon EF 100mm f2.8 Macro, Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5, 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC

The Singular Image (external link)Richard Smith Photography (external link)
Richard Smith Real Estate Photography (external link)500PX (external link)
Fine Art America (external link)

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Van ­ Gogh
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Aug 27, 2015 06:41 |  #55

rgs wrote in post #17684437 (external link)
A couple of suggestions that I hope have not been made already.

1. Some have suggested getting a somewhat lighter tripod unless you seriously plan to purchase the 300 in the near future. I'm going to agree with that. A really big, heavy tripod has the disadvantage of discouraging it's use because of it's size. Get a more normal sized tripod that you will be eager to use. Then, when you get the 300, get a wooden tripod to use with the 300. Wooden tripods are heavy and a bit clumsy, but they are also capable of holding great weight and wood damps vibrations better than ANY tripod material including CF. If it's just for use with a large, long lens, the tripod's size and weight will not be an issue. And it will be much cheaper than a CF mega-pod. Mine (rarely used since my view camera is rarely used anymore) made for me by a woodworker/photogrpahe​r friend. It has mohogany legs and a paduk base. It's beautiful but heavy and very solid.

2. Ball heads are most popular and may well be your choice. But, if you want to make frequent fine adjustments to camera position, take a look at geared heads. They are slower to use, heavy and big but you can put the camera precisely where you want it without fail. The Manfrotto 410 Junior (external link) is the most common one and is not too expensive. If you want to spend more there are a couple of very nice Arca-Swiss models.

3. One final point. Rather than try to get around your Black Rapid, perhaps take a look at the Peak Design Slide. It does not work the same way as the BR (the whole strap slides instead of the connector) but it does the same thing without disabling the tripod socket and, because it is a 2 point connection instead of single point, the camera is more stable and doesn't twist and dangle.

Hope these help you think through this. It's an important purchase. Best of luck with it.


1) When I started this thread I was leaning towards the TVC 33 with BH55, but now since many have stressed not to underestimate portability, I am more leaned towards the TVC 24 with BH40. If in the future I have so much cash to drop on a 300 and up prime, I might as well get the heavier tripod for those occasions, I would probably be able to afford it. :-D

2) More refined adjustments are nice but again referring to your point 1, if portability is somewhat important than I would rather go with a ballhead.

3) I took a look at Peak Design, looks like a very nice alternative for leaving the tripod socket free. I think it will also really benefit people who use grips as that way the BR's tripod attachment does not get in the way when you grip the vertical grip. I like the idea but with one exception. When using longer lenses that are heavier than the bodies (like 70-200), I don't think making the strap attachment from camera is a good idea, it would not balance very well and there would be too much stress on camera. How would I attach the sling strap to the lenses thread, would it work that way?


Camera - 2x5Dmk3, C100 mkii, 70D, 60D
Lenses - 24-70mm f2.8L II, 70-200mm f2.8L IS ii, 85mm f1.2L II, 35mm f1.4 ART, 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS
Lighting - 3 x 600EX RT's, Printer - Epson 3880
Website - http://www.shotlifestu​dio.com/ (external link)

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peter_n
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Aug 27, 2015 08:26 |  #56

Many of us here have more than one tripod. I use a travel tripod, a mid-sized systematic and a tripod with an articulating center column for studio work. Most tripods are compromises in design. A RRS series 2 is fine if you have moderate sized equipment, but a series 3 and a travel tripod might suit your requirements better.


~Peter

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Van ­ Gogh
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Toronto, Canada
Aug 27, 2015 17:43 |  #57

Ok so I am about to place my order, will probably decide between the 2nd and 3rd series bodies at the very last second through an impulse choice  :p
I will also definitely get an L plate.

I have one question though. Will L plate work with my 70-200 f2.8 if I attach the plate to that lenses collar or I have to get some other kind of quick release system for my 70-200 lens?


Camera - 2x5Dmk3, C100 mkii, 70D, 60D
Lenses - 24-70mm f2.8L II, 70-200mm f2.8L IS ii, 85mm f1.2L II, 35mm f1.4 ART, 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS
Lighting - 3 x 600EX RT's, Printer - Epson 3880
Website - http://www.shotlifestu​dio.com/ (external link)

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corndog ­ cabernet
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Post has been edited over 2 years ago by corndog cabernet.
Aug 27, 2015 18:12 |  #58

Van Gogh wrote in post #17685497 (external link)
I have one question though. Will L plate work with my 70-200 f2.8 if I attach the plate to that lenses collar or I have to get some other kind of quick release system for my 70-200 lens?

No, no. An L plate is for a camera body. Main advantage is you don't have to "flop" the head for verticals. Not applicable to your 70-200 because the collar allows rotation.
For the lens' collar's shoe, you'll get a plate that'll vary anywhere from the length of the shoe itself, to somewhat longer, to a lot longer. The different lengths are to aid in balance. You'll need to figure this out by holding the lens/camera/L-plate assembly by the shoe and see how well it balances.

A proper plate will have a lip to catch the edge of the shoe. This prevents rotation.




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FarmerTed1971
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Portland, OR
Aug 27, 2015 18:14 |  #59

corndog cabernet wrote in post #17685532 (external link)
A proper plate will have a lip to catch the edge of the shoe. This prevents rotation.

This is key!


Getting better at this - Fuji Xt-2 - Fuji X-Pro2 - 18-55 - 35 f2 WR - 50-140 - 6D - 135L - 70-200 f4L IS - 600EX-RT x2 - ST-E3-RT - flickr (external link) - www.scottaticephoto.co​m (external link)

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Van ­ Gogh
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Aug 27, 2015 20:37 |  #60

corndog cabernet wrote in post #17685532 (external link)
No, no. An L plate is for a camera body. Main advantage is you don't have to "flop" the head for verticals. Not applicable to your 70-200 because the collar allows rotation.
For the lens' collar's shoe, you'll get a plate that'll vary anywhere from the length of the shoe itself, to somewhat longer, to a lot longer. The different lengths are to aid in balance. You'll need to figure this out by holding the lens/camera/L-plate assembly by the shoe and see how well it balances.

A proper plate will have a lip to catch the edge of the shoe. This prevents rotation.

Would this work for the 70-200L IS 2?
http://www.reallyright​stuff.com ...i-use-fore-aft-plate.html (external link)


Camera - 2x5Dmk3, C100 mkii, 70D, 60D
Lenses - 24-70mm f2.8L II, 70-200mm f2.8L IS ii, 85mm f1.2L II, 35mm f1.4 ART, 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS
Lighting - 3 x 600EX RT's, Printer - Epson 3880
Website - http://www.shotlifestu​dio.com/ (external link)

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Looking for a high-quality tripod
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