Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Read More.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk
Thread started 08 Oct 2012 (Monday) 01:55
Prev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

Why photograph wildlife?

 
Capt. ­ Shutter
Member
48 posts
Joined Mar 2014
Oct 19, 2015 20:57 |  #121

Why photograph wildlife? Why does the hunter go buy a license and hunt when they can buy meat at the store? Or fisherman? I don't like killing and skinning the animals, I would rather shoot them with a Canon than a firearm and still I have a "trophy" and the animal is free to do what it does. THAT's why I do, I hunt with a camera, not a firearm.




LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)
Loxley
Member
Loxley's Avatar
Joined Apr 2013
South Florida
Oct 30, 2015 10:15 |  #122

If you want to be a wildlife photographer because you want to produce "the best" shots, you're doing it for the wrong reasons. If you are depressed because your shots aren't sharp, colorful, lively, captivating.. you're doing it for the wrong reasons..

The reason I love wildlife photography is the adventure, the journey, being free in nature. I love to observe the wildlife and watch their mannerisms. Catching a great shot is just a plus.

Honestly, a lot of the time, I don't even take the shot. I put the camera down (or never pick it up) and just live in the moment. Listen to the wind blow through the trees and the leaves, the stream flow over the rocks, birds chirping, and watch my subject interact with the world and nature... It's a beautiful thing, and that is why I'm a wildlife photographer.

Sometimes I come home with 0 shots. Sometimes I come home with 500 and keep 3. It's not the quality of the photograph it's the quality of the moment.


Patrick | SmugMug (external link) | Full Gear List

LOG IN TO REPLY
Niccas9
Senior Member
Niccas9's Avatar
Joined Jun 2011
California
Oct 30, 2015 16:35 |  #123

Why photograph at all?

The journey/purpose/proces​s/fill in the blank of photographing is different for all of us. We are all driven and motivated in different ways. Why do the pursuits of others concern you so much. It seems that they were enjoying the moment more than you, which is unfortunate.

Find the avenue of photography that drives you, and focus your energy on that.




LOG IN TO REPLY
jefzor
Senior Member
Joined Jul 2013
Post has been last edited over 2 years ago by jefzor. 2 edits done in total.
Nov 06, 2015 00:25 |  #124

(Old thread, but I just can't resist)

There's more to wildlife photography than "birds on sticks". The challenge is to find a way to produce creative shots. Having little to no control over the subject and the environment only makes it more challenging.

When I go out photographing, all I expect is a nice walk and fresh air. Most days I get no good photos at all, but when I do get something, it feels great.

I just can't recommend it enough, It's the most fun hobby I ever had.

Pix:

HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.

HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.

www.jefpauwels.beexternal link

LOG IN TO REPLY
jefzor
Senior Member
Joined Jul 2013
Post has been edited over 2 years ago by jefzor.
Nov 06, 2015 00:28 |  #125

I can understand that it's intimidating to take photos of popular subjects. But photographing something that's been "done to death" only motivates me to try harder. Some days it's easier to do something unique than you'd expect.

For example:

-The Mont St Michel must be one of the most photographed places in Europe, but that didn't keep me from going there two sunrises and 2 sunsets in a row.

-There were at least 10 other photographers present when these 2 foxes started yelping at each other, yet I'm confident I'm the only one who got this shot.

More pix:

HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.

HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.

www.jefpauwels.beexternal link

LOG IN TO REPLY
Triplexbee
Member
Triplexbee's Avatar
Joined Aug 2013
Peterborough
Nov 06, 2015 02:08 |  #126

This thread, more specifically the op's sentiment strikes a chord with me.

I class myself as a naturalist with a camera and as such my primary enjoyment comes from being out in the field, using my fieldcraft and knowledge to get me the experiences that bring me pleasure.

My photography of these experiences falls into the 99.9% done before, done better, sterile, documentary style the op has questioned the merits of.

While I am still satisfied with my records, I now really want to take images that stand apart from the masses (don't we all?).

So what's holding me back? It seems silly when I say it but I think I lack the creative imagination to set me apart and I fear that may be a natural talent that cannot be learned.


flickrexternal link

LOG IN TO REPLY
aladyforty
Goldmember
aladyforty's Avatar
Joined Dec 2005
Albany: Western Australia
Post has been edited over 2 years ago by aladyforty.
Jan 25, 2016 08:54 |  #127

finally read the whole thread and to be honest I can see the original posters point. I have been photographing birds for years now, my bird photo-stream on flickr is always getting visits etc. However I am slowly becoming bored with what I do, I think my photos are OK, not sure if they are sterile or not. I find myself wondering all the time why I'm even doing it these days, I used to enjoy it a lot as Id walk for miles and enjoy the actual beauty of being out in the Australian bush yet since Ive got some ankle issues I cant walk as far so I'm visiting the same areas etc. I have a 7DII and a reach of 600mm and sometimes ask myself is there some other challenging way for me to try and get back my mojo for wildlife photography, maybe start showing more of the actual environment than just sharp images, maybe take out the full frame more and see if it makes a difference, I really dont know. maybe step away from the animals for a while. Photography has basically been my only real passion for many years, Id hate to lose that passion.


5DIII 7DII Fuji X100 Fuji X10 17-40L 135L 70-200F4ISL Tamron 150-600
My Flickr https://www.flickr.com​/photos/25426422@N00/ (external link)
Birding page (archives cant add to them, lost password) https://www.flickr.com​/photos/59111660@N08/ (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
ThomasDidymus
Member
ThomasDidymus's Avatar
Joined Sep 2015
Saint Augustine
Jan 27, 2016 23:27 |  #128

So I read this post and decided to say and post something. To me wildlife photography is my hobby but also something that make me feel closer to God. I find that stocking of and animal were it be a bird our a lizard to be fun, the same rush I get when hunting. For me I is all about catching a moment that you liked. The picture below happened today. The Bird was just begging for it.. He was quacking and making a lot of noise because it was wet and I had my camera and about a minute with it before having to go inside to help with our churches youth group. Yea I know it is not perfect but it was a second that something awesome was happening in front of me and I captured it and to me that is what Photography is all about unless you are doing it for a living.

HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.

Eyes like a shutter, mind like a lens..

LOG IN TO REPLY
Apricane
Senior Member
Apricane's Avatar
Joined Nov 2011
Canada's Federal Capital
Post has been edited over 2 years ago by Apricane.
Jan 27, 2016 23:33 |  #129

aladyforty wrote in post #17871880 (external link)
finally read the whole thread and to be honest I can see the original posters point. I have been photographing birds for years now, my bird photo-stream on flickr is always getting visits etc. However I am slowly becoming bored with what I do, I think my photos are OK, not sure if they are sterile or not. I find myself wondering all the time why I'm even doing it these days, I used to enjoy it a lot as Id walk for miles and enjoy the actual beauty of being out in the Australian bush yet since Ive got some ankle issues I cant walk as far so I'm visiting the same areas etc. I have a 7DII and a reach of 600mm and sometimes ask myself is there some other challenging way for me to try and get back my mojo for wildlife photography, maybe start showing more of the actual environment than just sharp images, maybe take out the full frame more and see if it makes a difference, I really dont know. maybe step away from the animals for a while. Photography has basically been my only real passion for many years, Id hate to lose that passion.

I don't think that you're making such a case about whether or not wildlife photography is purposeful or not, but rather you're only expressing your own disappointment at how much you've been lacking in creativity/opportunity in approaching the subject. In some ways, I sympathize with you, as I've not been out to shoot wildlife for quite a while now, for lack of what I feel are good opportunities - either in terms of catching interesting birds or because the weather hasn't been cooperatiing - but that doesn't mean that the subject isn't interesting or doesn't have potential and/or purpose, a point, only that I need to seek a new way to approach it.

If your only perspective on bird/wildlife photography is that you point, compose with the subject in the middle and press the shutter to obtain a sharp image, then it's no surprise that you should feel a bit disillusioned with the subject; however, that's hardly the subject's fault.


Apricane 500px (external link) flickr (external link) | 6D | T2i | 430EX II & 270EX II
15-85 | ∑24-105A | 55-250 STM | 70-300L
24 STM | 35 f/2 IS | 40 STM | 100L

LOG IN TO REPLY
Tom ­ Reichner
"I am a little creepy"
Tom Reichner's Avatar
Joined Dec 2008
Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
Jan 27, 2016 23:40 |  #130

.

ThomasDidymus wrote in post #17875821 (external link)
For me it is all about catching a moment that I liked.
.....it was a second that something awesome was happening in front of me and I captured it and to me that is what Photography is all about.

Thomas,

That is a very meaningful - and even beautiful - answer to the OP's question, "Why photograph wildlife?"

.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

LOG IN TO REPLY
Tareq
"I am very lazy, a normal consumer"
Tareq's Avatar
17,709 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Joined Jan 2006
Ajman - UAE
Jan 28, 2016 00:19 |  #131

The question will be the same to another types of photography, i shoot landscapes, sports, and most of the time i shoot same subjects in those two areas, but the good thing that i can have my own style specially in sports, the action is always usual new, different players, different audience, so it will be always something new even it is regular shooting team against team or player against player.

Just in landscapes, when i keep seeing those mind blowing scenarios then i always thinking to go there and have my turn, and i did read an article or someone posted about is it real of what we see of those so breath-taking beautiful landscapes photos? and if so then how can we do it different better or at least as beautiful if not more, so it is almost same question about how or why we shoot those landscapes when it is done millions times since long years ago and photographers had books/videos/history about it, but to me, i go there to enjoy watching that beauty first, then i do my best to have my own style if i can, and most those photographers are great in editing/pp too while i am not.


Galleries:
http://hamrani.deviant​art.com/gallery/external link
Gear List
Facebookexternal link

LOG IN TO REPLY
johnf3f
Goldmember
johnf3f's Avatar
3,765 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Joined Apr 2010
Wales
Jan 28, 2016 18:58 |  #132

"Why photograph wildlife?"
Because I enjoy it - Simples!


Life is for living, cameras are to capture it (one day I will learn how!).

LOG IN TO REPLY
ThomasDidymus
Member
ThomasDidymus's Avatar
Joined Sep 2015
Saint Augustine
Jan 28, 2016 23:55 as a reply to johnf3f's post |  #133

It is fun... If it was up to me I would do it daily.. If I had the money I would buy a Nikon 200-500 just because I love it that much...


Eyes like a shutter, mind like a lens..

LOG IN TO REPLY
aezoss
Senior Member
Joined Nov 2013
Jan 29, 2016 19:57 |  #134

aladyforty wrote in post #17871880 (external link)
finally read the whole thread and to be honest I can see the original posters point. I have been photographing birds for years now, my bird photo-stream on flickr is always getting visits etc. However I am slowly becoming bored with what I do, I think my photos are OK, not sure if they are sterile or not. I find myself wondering all the time why I'm even doing it these days, I used to enjoy it a lot as Id walk for miles and enjoy the actual beauty of being out in the Australian bush yet since Ive got some ankle issues I cant walk as far so I'm visiting the same areas etc. I have a 7DII and a reach of 600mm and sometimes ask myself is there some other challenging way for me to try and get back my mojo for wildlife photography, maybe start showing more of the actual environment than just sharp images, maybe take out the full frame more and see if it makes a difference, I really dont know. maybe step away from the animals for a while. Photography has basically been my only real passion for many years, Id hate to lose that passion.

For the record, I really enjoy your images. The Raven is amazing. Perhaps taking a leave of absence from wildlife and shooting something completely different for 6-12 months would help.

In my inconsequential opinion, nature photographers who share their work are creating a significant, and historically useful, record of species alive and thriving today. Not all these species will be around 50, 100, 200 years hence.

Keep at it folks.

Lee




LOG IN TO REPLY
rgfrison
Senior Member
rgfrison's Avatar
Joined Jul 2008
Eastern Washington
Feb 02, 2016 12:09 |  #135

Once a long time ago, before I was into photography, I watched a herd of elk during the early spring, they were in a field that had been sprayed by a crop duster a few days before. A young calf probably a week or two old picked up a piece of toilet paper that the plane drops to know what has and hasn't been sprayed, it took the toilet paper in it's mouth and ran back and forth across the hillside jumping and twirling like a rhythmic gymnast. I don't think it has all been shot before, and looking for that golden moment is half the fun.


Randy

LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

30,136 views & 44 likes for this thread
Why photograph wildlife?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk


Not a member yet? Click here to register to the forums.
Registered members get all the features: search, following threads, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, settings, view hosted photos, own reviews and more...


AAA

Send feedback to staff    •   Jump to forum...    •   Rules    •   Index    •   New posts    •   RTAT    •   'Best of'    •   Gallery    •   Gear    •   Reviews    •   Polls

COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy policy and cookie usage info.

POWERED BY AMASS 1.4version 1.4
made in Finland
by Pekka Saarinen
for photography-on-the.net
Spent 0.00232 for 6 database queries.
PAGE COMPLETED IN 0.14s
Latest registered member is ruby55
716 guests, 308 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017