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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography
Thread started 17 Aug 2008 (Sunday) 12:20
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How does one get press credentials for photography?

 
GoHokiesGo
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Joined Feb 2007
N. Virginia
Mar 13, 2016 06:26 |  #31

Scott West wrote in post #17928792 (external link)
I hope this is not off topic... are 100-400 lenses not allowed in most arenas because of competition with pro photographers? I was told my camera was too professional looking in Madison at the Kohl Center for a Men's basketball game. However, after I walked back to my car and removed the 100-400, I was allowed to bring in the camera with a 50. I bought and paid for a ticket to sit in the stands not under the basket. Thoughts would be appreciated. There were others with larger lenses and no credentials around their neck and a couple of others with 70-200s or 100-300s sitting closer than me.

Staying off-topic since its an old thread...

Most of the venues that I have attended in the past specify limits based on size/length, not based on looking professional. I've always assumed that this is due to the fan experience in the stands; a non-photographer sitting behind you doesn't want your large camera lens blocking their view for half the game, and he's plenty entitled to the view from the seat he/she paid for.

When you're in the stands I've never really thought of it as competition with the pros, but more-so about how your equipment deters from the experience of the fans around you. The photo enthusiasts on this site might not care, but I could see it being almost(ok, not quite) as annoying to a non-photographer as that guy in front of you waving a foam finger in your view all game.


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djr81
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Mar 13, 2016 23:41 |  #32

GoHokiesGo wrote in post #17933612 (external link)
Staying off-topic since its an old thread...

Most of the venues that I have attended in the past specify limits based on size/length, not based on looking professional. I've always assumed that this is due to the fan experience in the stands; a non-photographer sitting behind you doesn't want your large camera lens blocking their view for half the game, and he's plenty entitled to the view from the seat he/she paid for.

When you're in the stands I've never really thought of it as competition with the pros, but more-so about how your equipment deters from the experience of the fans around you. The photo enthusiasts on this site might not care, but I could see it being almost(ok, not quite) as annoying to a non-photographer as that guy in front of you waving a foam finger in your view all game.

Well to give you a random example - if you go to the test cricket in Australia (Possibly not a likely event) buried in the fine print it says you cannot take a lens longer than 200mm So a 70-200 IS 2.8 of your 7D is fine but you will (Allegedly) get frog marched if you dare to take in a 70-300 on a 5D.

I don't think it is about keeping the spectators view unhindered. They hand out great bid cards with 4/6 written on them for people to wave about. For my 10 cents worth I think it is just part of some sporting bodies obsession with having control of everything. This despite the uni student security guards having no clue what they are looking for.

Anyway with a 300 lens you are struggling to get enough light and zoom to get a half decent shot as a trip to the 20 20 competition earlier this year showed. So, sorry to all the KP fans out there, I wish I could have done better but he was given out despite missing it by a good 3 inches.

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Wilt
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Mar 14, 2016 17:23 |  #33

NOT from the International Freelance Photographers Organization


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TooManyShots
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Mar 15, 2016 21:33 |  #34

Wilt wrote in post #17935328 (external link)
NOT from the International Freelance Photographers Organization


What? The IFPO??? :)


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Roamingbull
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Mar 19, 2016 18:54 |  #35

I honestly did not read all the replies so I am probably reinforcing what most have said, but here is my two cents.

Press credentials are really just that. You need to be working for or affiliated with some type of media outlet. You can call the main office holding the event and ask for the PR rep. Maybe they will issue you one, maybe they will not. Or, you can go to a media outlet that may be near or associated with it, and attempt to get one from them on a freelance basis. You will most likely need to sell yourself however. Other times it may be as simple as knowing someone who can get you that access.

If you are unable to do any of this, your best bet is to do the best you can from the crowd side. Sometimes if you act official and are assertive (not rude or pushy) you can get away with a lot. But you will need some finesse.

Its important to point out that press releases really are not just for the "Cool" pictures. They are a representation that you are a professional photographer, most likely covered by insurance, and understand the liability issues that may be a factor in that particular event. For example, you can get by a fire line to photograph a fire or hazmat, but you may loose your clothes and camera equipment on the way out as you are decontaminated. Press releases are a statement you understand the risks, are not a liability, and have the right to be there.

Good luck


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Joined Dec 2008
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Post has been edited over 1 year ago by Tom Reichner.
Mar 19, 2016 19:46 |  #36

Roamingbull wrote in post #17941146 (external link)
Press credentials are really just that. You need to be working for or affiliated with some type of media outlet.

Its important to point out that press releases really are not just for the "Cool" pictures. They are a representation that you are a professional photographer, most likely covered by insurance, and understand the liability issues that may be a factor in that particular event. Press releases are a statement you understand the risks, are not a liability, and have the right to be there.

Very well explained. The last thing that the venue or event managers want is a hobbiest being somewhere that only professionals are supposed to be........and I wholeheartedly agree with that mindset.

.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "peace of mind", NOT "piece of mind".

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How does one get press credentials for photography?
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