Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Read More.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk
Thread started 14 Apr 2016 (Thursday) 07:09
Prev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

macro lighting

 
DanFrank
Senior Member
DanFrank's Avatar
380 posts
Joined Dec 2010
Buffalo, NY
Apr 14, 2016 07:09 |  #1

With indoor macro, whats everyone using for lighting? Was thinking of getting a Wescott 50inch softbox and an Eisten. Would that be sufficient?


Gear "A creative man is motivated by the desire to achieve, not by the desire to beat others"

LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)
Swiftlet
Member
80 posts
Joined Feb 2016
Post has been edited over 1 year ago by Swiftlet.
Apr 15, 2016 08:16 |  #2

:)

For bees' knees, you'd be better off with a cut up table tennis ball , really.

The subject cares about the angle the light comes from, not how far away it is.

You only need extraordinary and large lighting if you're photographing ball bearings, or some thing which behaves like one.
Exposed integrated circuits with everything gold and shiny are an example. Then you have to play with crossed polarized light too.

Ordinary writing paper, bent into a "tent" is remarkably good.
Usually you can put your flash head(s) close so you don't need much power.
Studio flash units can be slow too, which can make a difference. 1/10,000th second is better than 1/500th, because macro things usually vibrate even if the camera doesn't.
Alien Bees are a favorite if you go that way.



Jack Swift

LOG IN TO REPLY
Alveric
Goldmember
Alveric's Avatar
Joined Jan 2011
Canada
Apr 15, 2016 13:55 |  #3

I use my Hensel monolights for indoor, still life macro.

IMAGE: http://cdn.ipernity.com/200/87/36/40728736.484fdc21.640.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: http://www.ipernity.co​m/doc/diamantstudios/4​0728736] (external link)
The Curtain Falls (external link) by Alveric (external link), on ipernity

And even for some 'outdoor' macros:
HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.

IMAGE: http://cdn.ipernity.com/200/83/70/40628370.7623ec84.640.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: http://www.ipernity.co​m/doc/diamantstudios/4​0628370] (external link)
Icestar (external link) by Alveric (external link), on ipernity

'The success of the second-rate is deplorable in itself; but it is more deplorable in that it very often obscures the genuine masterpiece. If the crowd runs after the false, it must neglect the true.' —Arthur Machen
Why 'The Histogram' Sux (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
Dalantech
Goldmember
Dalantech's Avatar
Joined Jul 2006
Bacoli, Italy
Apr 18, 2016 04:18 |  #4

There are a couple of things that make answering your question not so cut and dry. If you have your camera on a tripod, and if the subject isn't moving, then you won't be too concerned about the duration of the flash. But if you're hand holding the camera, shooting a moving target, or both then you'll want to get the flash as close to the subject as possible to keep the duration of the light as short as possible. Also the closer the diffuser is to the subject the better the diffusion will be. Then we can also talk about the general quality of the light -color temp, softness (not to be confused with diffusion), etc. There are some areas that I've struggled with that have had a big influence on how I diffuse the MT-24EX. Beetle shells:

IMAGE: https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5746/21537838640_d50ce4b62f_c.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/yPe4​4w] (external link)Bug Birth Day (external link) by John Kimbler (external link), on Flickr

The eyes of some solitary bees:

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1472/25827959023_5d508f53c7_c.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/Fmk3​ok] (external link)Newborn Blue Mason Bee IV (external link) by John Kimbler (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1499/26194503620_face785ac2_c.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/FUHF​jL] (external link)Nature's Speeing Bag I (external link) by John Kimbler (external link), on Flickr

Some of them are actually quite glossy and it's really easy to blow out the specular highlights.

My Gallery (external link)
My Blog (external link)
Macro Tutorials (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
davholla
Senior Member
Joined Nov 2014
Apr 18, 2016 04:41 |  #5

Good photos but the first one is of Bugs not Beetles (Hemiptera not Coleoptera).
I think everyone struggles with them.




LOG IN TO REPLY
Dalantech
Goldmember
Dalantech's Avatar
Joined Jul 2006
Bacoli, Italy
Apr 18, 2016 05:17 |  #6

davholla wrote in post #17975831 (external link)
Good photos but the first one is of Bugs not Beetles (Hemiptera not Coleoptera).
I think everyone struggles with them.

Good catch :)


My Gallery (external link)
My Blog (external link)
Macro Tutorials (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
davholla
Senior Member
Joined Nov 2014
Apr 18, 2016 05:19 |  #7

Dalantech wrote in post #17975843 (external link)
Good catch :)

Thanks I meant to say everyone struggles with the light on their exo skeleton not distinguishing between them.
Even with natural light there can be problems.




LOG IN TO REPLY
Dalantech
Goldmember
Dalantech's Avatar
Joined Jul 2006
Bacoli, Italy
Apr 18, 2016 05:26 |  #8

davholla wrote in post #17975846 (external link)
Thanks I meant to say everyone struggles with the light on their exo skeleton not distinguishing between them.
Even with natural light there can be problems.

I actually find natural light easier in some ways, but when it's good there just isn't enough of it for anything but still life (with the camera on a tripod) at 1x and higher mag. That's why I prefer to use a flash, since it gives me more options. The trick, at least for me and my photographic style, is to get the light quality that I want in a very small space. I don't think it's possible to have a discussion about macro lighting without taking technique into account. There's a big difference between choosing a method and then finding subjects that you can photograph with it verses letting the subject dictate what you're going to do.


My Gallery (external link)
My Blog (external link)
Macro Tutorials (external link)

LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as registered member)

3,000 views & 1 like for this thread
macro lighting
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk


Not a member yet? Click here to register to the forums.
Registered members get all the features: search, following threads, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, settings, view hosted photos, own reviews and more...


AAA

Send feedback to staff    •   Jump to forum...    •   Rules    •   Index    •   New posts    •   RTAT    •   'Best of'    •   Gallery    •   Gear    •   Reviews    •   Polls

COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy policy and cookie usage info.

POWERED BY AMASS 1.4version 1.4
made in Finland
by Pekka Saarinen
for photography-on-the.net
Spent 0.00185 for 6 database queries.
PAGE COMPLETED IN 0.03s
Latest registered member is radislavi4
1008 guests, 515 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017