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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk
Thread started 03 May 2016 (Tuesday) 09:49
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Is early in the morning better to get macro photos?

 
davholla
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Joined Nov 2014
May 03, 2016 09:49 |  #1

I recently got up early whilst visiting Dundee in Scotland to take photos and got some quite interesting ones (see below).
Normally I cannot get up early (family reason) to take Macro photos.
Do others find this is a more productive time?
This was about 6.30 am in April

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1537/26118822954_bbe8252b5c_n.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/FN2N​6G] (external link)EF7A7527millipede (external link) by davholla2002 (external link), on Flickr


IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1648/26707538736_f96f9a3b67_n.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/GG47​MN] (external link)EF7A7549springtail (external link) by davholla2002 (external link), on Flickr



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JacobL
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May 03, 2016 14:08 |  #2

Yes.

In the morning (very early) insects are still sleeping. They can be moved, posed and manipulated and shot comfortably with a tripod.
Later on it's high speed flash shooting.




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davholla
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May 04, 2016 04:08 |  #3

JacobL wrote in post #17994673 (external link)
Yes.

In the morning (very early) insects are still sleeping. They can be moved, posed and manipulated and shot comfortably with a tripod.
Later on it's high speed flash shooting.

That is what I thought, now I just need to persuade my son and wife to change their body clock so I can get better photos.




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orionmystery
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May 04, 2016 07:22 |  #4

Night time is great too! You'll see lots of interesting creatures that you might never see during the day!!

http://orionmystery.bl​ogspot.my/2012/05/nigh​t-macro.html (external link)


Kurt, 70D/40D, Laowa 15mm, 60mm F2/270EX, MP-E65/MT-24EX for full flash (external link), Sigma 150 +1.4x TC for natural light (external link).
Plan a macro/herping trip with us:
Borneo Herp Tour Nov 2017 (external link)

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A-PeeR
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May 04, 2016 07:39 |  #5

Typically, Insects are a tad bit slower in the morning before the sun crests. I find temperature to be a bigger factor in finding subjects that are easier to shoot. The cooler it is in the morning, the more lethargic the insects tend to be. Where I live, I find early spring and early fall to be the best times to find easy pickings in the field. Afternoon temperatures rise and ensure plenty of insect activity. Temperatures drop in the evening and insects hunker down in the flower patches and grass fields. Insects will remain hunkered down until the sun warms them up the next day. I like to use these opportunities to work on available light macro photography.




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davholla
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May 04, 2016 08:13 |  #6

orionmystery wrote in post #17995450 (external link)
Night time is great too! You'll see lots of interesting creatures that you might never see during the day!!

http://orionmystery.bl​ogspot.my/2012/05/nigh​t-macro.html (external link)

Very true in the tropics I love going for walks at night, although it is not always possible due to my wife's paranoia regarding snakes. You see 100x more stick insects at night
I haven't tried in the UK very much, of course here, half the year the nights are short and the other half very cold.




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JacobL
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May 04, 2016 08:51 |  #7

The problem with night macro is that there is no available light.
setting up anything is extremely complicated, you need to use a flash and then you might risk scaring off the subject.




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Wilt
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Post has been edited over 1 year ago by Wilt.
May 04, 2016 09:25 |  #8

In the quiet solitude just after dawn, you can be more studied and thoughtful about your shooting, and have fewer distractions from others wandering past. And the light is more sublime, not so contrasty as in the glaring sunlight!


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davholla
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May 04, 2016 10:07 |  #9

JacobL wrote in post #17995515 (external link)
The problem with night macro is that there is no available light.
setting up anything is extremely complicated, you need to use a flash and then you might risk scaring off the subject.

I find that torches rarely scare things off, some things e.g. lizards and dragonflies are in really deep sleep (or so busy hoping that you cannot see them) that you get can photos without too many problems.
I doubt I would have got this in the day (sadly a leaf was in the way of the rest of its body).

IMAGE: https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5657/20965252991_2fb7539eda_n.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/xWCp​ia] (external link)IMG_7143Lizard (external link) by davholla2002 (external link), on Flickr



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orionmystery
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May 04, 2016 11:31 |  #10

davholla wrote in post #17995490 (external link)
Very true in the tropics I love going for walks at night, although it is not always possible due to my wife's paranoia regarding snakes. You see 100x more stick insects at night
I haven't tried in the UK very much, of course here, half the year the nights are short and the other half very cold.

I look mainly for snakes when I go to the jungles at night! LOL. But I'll photograph anything that is of interest to me.


Kurt, 70D/40D, Laowa 15mm, 60mm F2/270EX, MP-E65/MT-24EX for full flash (external link), Sigma 150 +1.4x TC for natural light (external link).
Plan a macro/herping trip with us:
Borneo Herp Tour Nov 2017 (external link)

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orionmystery
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May 04, 2016 11:32 |  #11

JacobL wrote in post #17995515 (external link)
The problem with night macro is that there is no available light.
setting up anything is extremely complicated, you need to use a flash and then you might risk scaring off the subject.

Been doing night macro for years. Never have any problem.


Kurt, 70D/40D, Laowa 15mm, 60mm F2/270EX, MP-E65/MT-24EX for full flash (external link), Sigma 150 +1.4x TC for natural light (external link).
Plan a macro/herping trip with us:
Borneo Herp Tour Nov 2017 (external link)

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davholla
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May 05, 2016 02:22 |  #12

orionmystery wrote in post #17995672 (external link)
I look mainly for snakes when I go to the jungles at night! LOL. But I'll photograph anything that is of interest to me.

You are not married to a woman from Cali, Colombia, for them that is SO dangerous and MUST be stopped. It has taken me years to get her to relax.




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Dalantech
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May 05, 2016 03:14 |  #13

In addition to finding lethargic subjects in the morning you can also shoot active subjects as well, you just gotta give them a reason to let you get close. Like injecting sugar syrup into a flower...

IMAGE: https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5742/21597936588_c744d15761_c.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/yUx5​63] (external link)Bees in a Wallflower Series 1-2 (external link) by John Kimbler (external link), on Flickr

Also when a lethargic subject starts to wake up stay close to it, and it might just get use to you...

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8886/18324986496_94949084f9_c.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/tVjm​43] (external link)Wool Carder Bee Series 2-1 (external link) by John Kimbler (external link), on Flickr

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orionmystery
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Post has been edited over 1 year ago by orionmystery.
May 10, 2016 06:55 |  #14

davholla wrote in post #17996387 (external link)
You are not married to a woman from Cali, Colombia, for them that is SO dangerous and MUST be stopped. It has taken me years to get her to relax.

:D : :p


Kurt, 70D/40D, Laowa 15mm, 60mm F2/270EX, MP-E65/MT-24EX for full flash (external link), Sigma 150 +1.4x TC for natural light (external link).
Plan a macro/herping trip with us:
Borneo Herp Tour Nov 2017 (external link)

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racketman
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May 22, 2016 02:18 |  #15

there is normally less wind in the morning and you may get dewdrops to add background interest. The guys who do multiple stacks with natural light/tripod shoot mainly in the morning.


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Is early in the morning better to get macro photos?
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