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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk
Thread started 24 May 2016 (Tuesday) 13:09
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Blurred edges in my Prague night shot.

 
Transient ­ W.A.S.P.
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Post has been edited over 1 year ago by Transient W.A.S.P..
May 24, 2016 13:09 |  #1

Hello, all. I would like some advice/critique of this shot of Prague at night. I was using my Canon 70D on TV, maybe 25-50 shutter speed with the ISO on Auto. The lens is a Tokina 11-16 f 2.8 Wide Angle. Most of the shot came out quite clear, but for some reason the edges seem blurry, especially on the right side. Most of my other shots came out in a similar way. What am I doing wrong?

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Transient W.A.S.P.

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Snydremark
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May 24, 2016 13:50 |  #2

It looks, to me, like you focused very close in the foreground. At f/5, that isn't going to give you very much depth of field, which matches what I can see in this image. You've only got a very close portion of the road/bridge that's in focus and everything else is outside of your DoF.

For shots like this you need to be at a much lower f/stop....F/8 to f/16 would be a good range to start in, and then focus on something deeper into the image; like the building at the opposite end/right of the bridge. That should get you enough DoF for things to appear better focused throughout the image.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

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RMyers
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Austin, TX
Post has been edited over 1 year ago by RMyers.
May 24, 2016 13:59 |  #3

First, I'm not an expert, but on an ultra wide you will be more likely to see blurring at the edges. Next, many people have found that their 11-16mm Tokina doesn't focus to infinity well. Like it almost does. I had this problem. Some shots seemed good, but trying to focus on stars it just wasn't quite in focus. Here is a link to an article on how to tweak it so it will focus to infinity. http://www.christiansc​hmeer.com ...Infinity-Focus-Adjustment (external link) The web site is slow to load so give it time.

Now, I'm not saying that is your problem, but I see that the tree in front is fairly sharp, but focus does fade out further in the distance. So it may be that the autofocus picked up on the tree and it was too close, or you are ending up with a focus issue because it can't focus to infinity. Or it just has a front focus issue that you can correct if your 70D has the ability to do a mirco focus adjustment. In fact, the link I gave is a last resort. Try the MFA first. Also try to switch to manual focus and see if you can focus on a star. If you can turn the focus ring far enough for a star to come into focus or slightly past focued then you probably need to do the work in the link. Again, I say, this is a last resort. Check what focus point is getting used when you shoot a picture like this and also check for a micro focus (MFA) issue first.

Oh, and I'm much happier with mine after fixing the infinity focus problem.


Rusty
Austin, TX

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ejenner
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Post has been last edited over 1 year ago by ejenner. 2 edits done in total.
May 24, 2016 22:45 |  #4

If it is both edges, but he center at distance is OK, then it could be that the lens has quite a bit of field curvature, rather than just the lens not being sharp on the edges at f5. The solution would be to either focus further into the image and check the edges using LV and/or stopping down a bit more. At 11mm I would have thought f5 would be enough to get something reasonable, but I would always use LV to check sharpness across the frame.

Two of my lenses have this issue - the 16-35 f4 IS and TE-S 17mm to some extent. When I want critical focus thought the image, I have to check the sides at close and infinity, not just the center (I may get the center sharp both close and infinity, but the edges will be soft at infinity).

If it is just one side of the image, then it could be a lens issue such as a decentered element.

Oh, and I would never use AF for a shot like this. Seems completely pointless to me with modern cameras with LV. I sometimes think that if folks used a MF film camera for a year they would quickly realize just how amazing LV with zoom really is, especially for landscapes.


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Transient ­ W.A.S.P.
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May 25, 2016 06:35 as a reply to Snydremark's post |  #5

Is this an auto vs manual focus issue? To be honest, when I was looking through the viewfinder everything seemed to be in focus. Looking at the image review on the screen everything looked good. I only saw it was blurred once I uploaded the images to my computer. Also, is the metering a problem?


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RMyers
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Joined Dec 2009
Austin, TX
May 25, 2016 07:26 as a reply to Transient W.A.S.P.'s post |  #6

Probably not a manual vs auto focus issue, but I'd be tempted to repeat it if you can by auto focus and manual. I really agree with the the comments about getting the focus point to be further in the distance rather than on the closer tree. Did you use a tripod? 1/25 is a bit on the slow side, but okay with an ultra wide lens.


Rusty
Austin, TX

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Snydremark
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May 25, 2016 10:10 |  #7

Transient W.A.S.P. wrote in post #18018428 (external link)
Is this an auto vs manual focus issue? To be honest, when I was looking through the viewfinder everything seemed to be in focus. Looking at the image review on the screen everything looked good. I only saw it was blurred once I uploaded the images to my computer. Also, is the metering a problem?

AF potentially through you off a bit here, but it isn't the AF specifically. Focus happens on a plane; there is only one point in space where the camera actually focuses, and then you have (conceptually) a box that expands in front of and behind that point in which things will be 'acceptably' in focus. This is your depth of field; the area in which your frame is acceptably in focus. In this image, you've used a larger aperture which gives a much more narrow depth of field AND it appears that focus landed around the front of the bridge (I assume this is where AF came into the issue). This means you're only, basically, getting the benefit of the back half of that conceptual box of in-focus space.

Looking through the viewfinder and using the review screen does not show enough detail of the scene to determine what is in focus and what isn't. They're simply too small. If you use Live View on the rear screen and zoom in to 10x, THEN you can gauge where your focus is a bit better.

Do some reading on hyperfocal distances (external link) and how you can make use of that concept. Just do your reading with a grain of salt; modern cameras/lenses have too short of a focus travel ("throw) and the distance scales are...estimates, at best. But, it can be used to better estimate where you need your focus to fall, within the frame, at a given focal length and aperture, in order to get the desired amount of your frame to be in focus.

Metering doesn't look too bad there for this type of a scene...it's dark at night :) Your White Balance might be something you want to tweak a bit when you're shooting scenes lit with those sodium vapor lights, which make everything orange. But that's an easy post processing tweak.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

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Blurred edges in my Prague night shot.
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