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FORUMS General Gear Talk Tripods, Monopods & Other Camera Support
Thread started 26 Jun 2016 (Sunday) 10:26
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Best travel tripod, no budget limit

 
big_g
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Lincolnshire UK (Live near Chernobyl now)
Post has been edited over 1 year ago by big_g.
Jul 14, 2016 11:35 as a reply to post 18065289 |  #16

I use the standard ball head that came with it. You get 2 options when you buy it, just the legs or with a head. The head is designed to be small enough to fit between the legs when they are folded back on themselves. If you use a head that is too big, which I think would be most to be honest, the tripod doesn't fold up to its smallest size.

Just tried it with my 1D4 and 100-400 Mk1 on it. Seems like it is strong enough for that, not rock solid like a 5 series but for something so tiny I would not expect anything better. Obviously you need to be careful with the centre column extended but that is the same for anything really. I avoid using it when I can. Certainly it is very useable with a load that large.

Using the lens tripod foot means that the load is extremely well balanced so you will have no issue with sag unless you are at some pretty extreme angles.

Hope this assists


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blair1955
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Jul 30, 2016 15:42 as a reply to post 18056297 |  #17

I just bought this tripod and have no regrets. I use a Canon 60D and a Tamron 150 ~ 600 mm lens and it's steady as a rock..




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Charlie
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Jul 30, 2016 17:18 |  #18

RRS TVC 24. RRS doesn't have it listed as a travel tripod, but it is IMO. Skip the rest.


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Bcaps
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Post has been last edited over 1 year ago by Bcaps. 2 edits done in total.
Aug 06, 2016 11:41 |  #19

Charlie wrote in post #18082124 (external link)
RRS TVC 24. RRS doesn't have it listed as a travel tripod, but it is IMO. Skip the rest.

I agree. I have the TVC-24 and love it. The weight savings of the TQC-14 over the TVC-24 is 11 ounces. Those 11 ounces will get you a tripod with significantly more stability.

Having said that, I just finished a 7 day backpacking trip that was all off-trail over difficult terrain and I opted to go with a Gitzo 1541T tripod that saved me 19 ounces over my TVC-24. In the end though I wish I would have brought my RRS as I missed a shot when I lost the light while I was removing the center column so I could get low enough to the ground. I wanted to throw the Gitzo off the side of the mountain that morning...


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Canon_Lover
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Aug 06, 2016 12:45 |  #20

Bcaps wrote in post #18088113 (external link)
I agree. I have the TVC-24 and love it. The weight savings of the TQC-14 over the TVC-24 is 11 ounces. Those 11 ounces will get you a tripod with significantly more stability.

Having said that, I just finished a 7 day backpacking trip that was all off-trail over difficult terrain and I opted to go with a Gitzo 1541T tripod that saved me 19 ounces over my TVC-24. In the end though I wish I would have brought my RRS as I missed a shot when I lost the light while I was removing the center column so I could get low enough to the ground. I wanted to throw the Gitzo off the side of the mountain that morning...

That's when it is nice to have tripod legs that can swing up 180 degrees. You can just flip the whole thing upside down and fire away at any height to the ground in seconds. You can also just lay the tripod on the ground and use the 90 degree head tilt to get the camera vertical again.

Looking at the RRS models mentioned, they don't seem to allow for the legs to fold up 180 degrees? Is that correct? My Manfrotto does not do this and has been an annoyance from time to time only being able to lift the legs 90 degrees.


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Bcaps
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Aug 06, 2016 12:53 |  #21

Canon_Lover wrote in post #18088171 (external link)
That's when it is nice to have tripod legs that can swing up 180 degrees. You can just flip the whole thing upside down and fire away at any height to the ground in seconds. You can also just lay the tripod on the ground and use the 90 degree head tilt to get the camera vertical again.

Looking at the RRS models mentioned, they don't seem to allow for the legs to fold up 180 degrees? Is that correct? My Manfrotto does not do this and has been an annoyance from time to time only being able to lift the legs 90 degrees.


The TVC-24 legs do not swing 180 degrees, but I've never had an issue with that tripod getting as low as I needed to.


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Canon_Lover
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Aug 06, 2016 13:27 |  #22

Bcaps wrote in post #18088181 (external link)
The TVC-24 legs do not swing 180 degrees, but I've never had an issue with that tripod getting as low as I needed to.

Oh duh. Poor reading comprehension on my part. I meant the Gitzo tripod which was difficult to get low.


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Bcaps
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Aug 06, 2016 14:53 |  #23

Canon_Lover wrote in post #18088216 (external link)
Oh duh. Poor reading comprehension on my part. I meant the Gitzo tripod which was difficult to get low.


Yeah, the Gitzo legs don't swing 180 degrees.


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Nikon D810
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SunDevilPilot
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Post has been edited over 1 year ago by SunDevilPilot.
Aug 24, 2016 18:23 |  #24

This week I took delivery of a Gitzo Traveler Series 2 (Legs and Head Combo). I added a Really Right Stuff L-Bracket to my camera and am really happy with the combination.

Tripod is very stable yet compact and light enough I can hike with it.

I have been using a Manfrotto 055 Aluminum Tripod and there is no comparison in terms of the quality difference. The Gitzo is far and above better and much more user friendly.

I found myself leaving the Manfrotto tripod behind because of the size and weight. Problem solved with the Gitzo which will fit inside by backpack.

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Knachosulli
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Aug 25, 2016 00:47 as a reply to post 18059617 |  #25

Good to know!




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johnf3f
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Aug 25, 2016 18:05 as a reply to Bcaps's post |  #26

Yes they do, it is just that the legs don't lock at specific angles. On most terrain this is not really an issue, though if the surface is slippery then things can get a bit embarrassing!

I have the Gitzo 1550T, which has the same spider (same part number), and it is very quick and easy to use upside down on pretty much any surface except things like slime covered rocks.


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ticker67
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Mount Juliet, USA
Aug 27, 2016 16:36 |  #27

If your budget can handle it i say Gitzo. If not, look into MeFoto.




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F2Bthere
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Sep 06, 2016 15:13 as a reply to ticker67's post |  #28

The 3-Legged Thing tripods are fantastic. They use standard Arca-Swiss plates, they fold up small and are quite stable and strong. (A little trip to YouTube will reveal people crazy enough to demonstrate the strength by balancing themselves on the tripods).

I have one that I am quite happy with which is at least three generations back. Which brings up the most interesting aspect. This little British company entered the tripod market as an upstart and brought very sophisticated engineering to the creation of a better tripod. And the innovation continues at a surprising rate.

Our local store finally started carrying them and the current generation is a huge step up because of all the small details they have improved. Just the feel of the knobs and the ease with which they lock and unlock...

There are less expensive alternatives which have similar specs, but the details and stability are much better.


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kaitlyn2004
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Sep 17, 2016 12:24 |  #29

Ah-keong wrote in post #18060106 (external link)
if budget is no issue: Gitzo (154 series)

personal preference : Manfrotto Befree

I've heard the befree isn't all that stable


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Ah-keong
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Sep 27, 2016 20:27 |  #30

kaitlyn2004 wrote in post #18130962 (external link)
I've heard the befree isn't all that stable

hmm, it works for me although I would have wish it have a hook to add weight in strong windy conditions.
I added three saucer plates to put my legs on in soft ground.
I would say it checked most of my boxes. :D


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Best travel tripod, no budget limit
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