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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk
Thread started 17 Nov 2016 (Thursday) 17:39
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Blinds - the tent kind.

 
Mel-S
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Eastern Idaho
Post has been edited over 1 year ago by Mel-S.
Nov 17, 2016 17:39 |  #1

Now that hunting seasons are coming to a close the closeout sales will start on tent style blinds. What brand/style do you use? What brand/styles do you say we should avoid? Thanks.


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Naturalist
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Nov 17, 2016 17:43 |  #2

Good question. I am interested in hearing more about this topic as well.


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Larry ­ Johnson
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Nov 17, 2016 18:01 |  #3

there's a thread dedicated to blinds.


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Mel-S
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Nov 17, 2016 19:48 |  #4

Larry Johnson wrote in post #18187454 (external link)
there's a thread dedicated to blinds.

Link?


80D, 70D, Sigma 18-35 f1.8 DC HSM ART, 24-70 f2.8L, 100-400 f 4.5-5.6L, Sigma 150-600 f5-6.3 DG OS HSM C, TC 1.4x III, 430 EX II, Induro AM24 w/3Pod H1, CT214 w/PHQ-1, and several cold beers.

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Grizz
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Nov 21, 2016 10:39 as a reply to Mel-S's post |  #5

This? http://photography-on-the.net ...read.php?t=1277087&​page=1


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Mel-S
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Nov 21, 2016 10:42 |  #6

Thanks.


80D, 70D, Sigma 18-35 f1.8 DC HSM ART, 24-70 f2.8L, 100-400 f 4.5-5.6L, Sigma 150-600 f5-6.3 DG OS HSM C, TC 1.4x III, 430 EX II, Induro AM24 w/3Pod H1, CT214 w/PHQ-1, and several cold beers.

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ShadowHillsPhoto
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Nov 23, 2016 09:40 |  #7

I would say it depends on what your intended subjects are, and what conditions you want to shoot in. If you are mostly going to be shooting back yard birds/non-game species then it doesn't matter all that much, just about any cheap blind will do. It's more about what size blind you want and any other features that may be important to you. If you want to focus on game species which are used to being hunted or expect to be shooting in particularly adverse conditions there is a case to be made for the premium blinds on the market.

High end blinds will be sturdier and able to stand up to strong winds when properly staked down that can literally destroy a cheap blind. Even in more moderate winds a cheap blind may be prone to flapping and moving which can spook your subjects. A good blind should also have a completely blacked out interior. This will obviously make the blind much darker inside and by wearing black/dark clothing you can become nearly invisible. I wear a black jacket or shirt, black gloves, and a black face mask when shooting from a blind. A premium blind will also be far more durable and last much longer than one that is cheaply made. Other considerations might include floor space, height, type and location of windows, silent windows, and speed and ease of setup.

For a relative bargain among premium blinds I would look at Rhino. https://www.rhinoblind​s.com/ (external link) I've had one of these for quite a few years now and it is fantastic. Very rugged and well made, very durable, and when staked down it isn't going to move. It is made from a heavy material that is stretched tight over the frame so no flapping. The window system isn't as versatile or customizable as some other designs but it is adequate for photography. Overall a very solid blind at a good price and one I would definitely recommend.

Earlier this year I was given a new Xenek Apex blind as a gift. http://www.huntxenek.c​om/ (external link) These were new on the market this year and in my opinion it may be the best blind available for photography. Like the Rhino blind it is very well made and sturdy. The unique feature of the Xenek is its main window. Like many blinds today the Xenek features a large 180° window that wraps around two sides of the blind. The window on the Xenek though is far larger top to bottom than any other blind on the market. The window is covered by two pieces of stretchy fabric that allow you to customize the shape and location of the opening within that larger window area. What I like for photography is that I can create a very low window and get my camera closer to the ground than with any other blind out there. I have been very impressed with this blind so far and it will be my first choice for photography going forward.

Probably the best known brand of high end blinds is Double Bull http://www.primos.com/​products/double-bull-blinds/ (external link). I had one of their blinds years ago and it was very well made. Then they got bought out by Primos, production was farmed out to China, and in my opinion the quality went downhill. That was close to 10 years ago now and I will admit that I don't have any experience with their most recent offerings from the past few years. You can find plenty of people that are still happy with them but I'll stick to either of the two blinds mentioned above.




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Blinds - the tent kind.
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