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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk
Thread started 01 Jan 2017 (Sunday) 19:44
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Photography blinds

 
recrisp
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Jan 08, 2017 16:49 |  #16

Pondrader wrote in post #18237959 (external link)
The only thing wrong with coma clothing is movement. in the blind you can lift a hand or move to grab a T-con. with just clothing one has to be quite disciplined in the art of movement

You are right about movement, I remember when I first started shooting wildlife when I saw 'anything' I would raise up my 100-400mm (Ver I) lens really fast like I was a quick-draw, and sure enough, I'd scare the 'prey' off. heh
I was just going with my reflexes, through a little time I learned what not to do by doing it, I learn by my screw ups, it's way more fun.

Nice deer shots, I haven't even seen one this year, of course from what I understand you have to actually go outside to see that, well, we do, you probably don't. :)

Randy


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Pondrader
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Jan 08, 2017 18:05 |  #17

lol too funny Randy, well I could have shot this from the computer chair but I was outside already LOL

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recrisp
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Jan 08, 2017 18:18 as a reply to Pondrader's post |  #18

You and I are almost exactly alike, we both have the same camera and lens!
(The big difference is that I will NEVER, EVER see a deer in my backyard and I rarely see snow, and I never get a shot like that)

That's another great shot, Jeff! :lol:

Randy


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Pondrader
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Jan 08, 2017 18:43 |  #19

recrisp wrote in post #18238071 (external link)
You and I are almost exactly alike, we both have the same camera and lens!
(The big difference is that I will NEVER, EVER see a deer in my backyard and I rarely see snow, and I never get a shot like that)

That's another great shot, Jeff! :lol:

Randy

Ive seen way to much snow this last while but the critters love me Randy... I was shooting the chickadees when this guy buzzed me

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Tom ­ Reichner
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Jan 08, 2017 19:19 |  #20

Here's another makeshift blind; a blind made just for the very occasion in which it was being used.

I was photographing pheasants at a big cattle ranch. The area the pheasants were using had a big metal feeding structure in it, as well as several other structures.

I bought some fleece blankets and wrapped them around the outer "cage" part of the feeder, held in place with safety pins. Then I cut some holes in the blankets to stick my lens out thru.

I took a couple of sleeping bags and a ground cloth in with me so that I wouldn't get so cold lying there all day in negative degrees Fahrenheit. The birds were already used to the structure, and didn't notice anything different about it when it had the blankets, which I made sure were the same color of the structure.

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recrisp
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Jan 08, 2017 19:30 |  #21

Pondrader wrote in post #18238091 (external link)
the critters love me Randy...


I know, we kind of noticed that! :)

I usually see an eagle when I shoot woodland birds too... wait, no, that's not me, sorry. Nice shot of a passerby, Jeff! heheh

Randy


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recrisp
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Post has been last edited 10 months ago by recrisp. 2 edits done in total.
Jan 08, 2017 19:32 |  #22

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18238124 (external link)
Here's another makeshift blind; a blind made just for the very occasion in which it was being used.

I was photographing pheasants at a big cattle ranch. The area the pheasants were using had a big metal feeding structure in it, as well as several other structures.

I bought some fleece blankets and wrapped them around the outer "cage" part of the feeder, held in place with safety pins. Then I cut some holes in the blankets to stick my lens out thru.

I took a couple of sleeping bags and a ground cloth in with me so that I wouldn't get so cold lying there all day in negative degrees Fahrenheit. The birds were already used to the structure, and didn't notice anything different about it when it had the blankets, which I made sure were the same color of the structure.

That's pretty cool AND convenient, but I know it's not always that easy! Huh? :)
I am assuming that the pheasant were there because of grain/seed on that farm?
If not that is a VERY good deal, to have pheasant around there, just because. :)
That's pretty cool, and good thinking, Tom!

Randy


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Pondrader
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Post has been edited 10 months ago by Pondrader.
Jan 08, 2017 20:12 |  #23

recrisp wrote in post #18238137 (external link)

I know, we kind of noticed that! :)

I usually see an eagle when I shoot woodland birds too... wait, no, that's not me, sorry. Nice shot of a passerby, Jeff! heheh

Randy

lol ya I do have a bunch of stuff around here. lol it was nice having a sunset tonight .. its been a while. This doe is actually standing on about two feet of hard packed snow.

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Tom ­ Reichner
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Jan 08, 2017 20:27 |  #24

recrisp wrote in post #18238143 (external link)
I am assuming that the pheasant were there because of grain/seed on that farm?
If not that is a VERY good deal, to have pheasant around there, just because. :)

They would walk thru that area as they went from their preferred habitat (thick swamp grasses) to the cattle pasture. They went to the cattle pasture to peck undigested bits of cracked corn out of the cattle crap. They would also rest share on occasion, "just because".

BUT, after photographing them a few times as passers-thru, I put some scratch out in the area, and it really helped, because then the pheasants would spend more time there, eating, instead of just passing thru and occasionally resting.

.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
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Grizz1
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Jan 08, 2017 20:50 |  #25

OK, Randy, (recrisp) I have to help set the record straight for you. Jeff lives in another world. He has the gear and skill to use it but lives among the birds/animals that he shares with us. When shooting, I don't think he worries about distance traveled as much as minimum focus distance! They come to him!! Can you tell that I'm just a little envious? I recall seeing the size of the firewood stacks when I visited his area last fall and it helps me feel a little better though.;-)a

IMAGE: https://c7.staticflickr.com/9/8226/8553674838_699a991016_b.jpg
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/e2RP​wo] (external link)BLIND 006 (external link) by steve findling (external link), on Flickr
This is a hub blind with leafy wear on the outside. It weighs about 7lbs, has many windows, over 5 feet square and about 5 foot 6 inches tall in center. I use it mainly for archery hunting but works great for photography as well. These are the blinds I leave set up for long periods, this one has faded a lot, taking on a orange/pink color from being in the Sunlight too long.
My experience with blinds have mostly been used for hunting the Eastern Wild Turkey and White Tail Deer. They can be set up in a large open field at daybreak and the Wild Turkey may approach within a few feet soon after they fly down. Deer though will be nervous for several days and avoid them by a hundred yards or more so I brush them in by setting up near heavy cover then cutting Cedar limbs and placing over and around the blind. Deer will get used to them if not brushed in but it takes a couple weeks before they approach very closely.
The advantages of this type blind for me is the room inside, black interior so if you do not open windows across from one another you can go undetected. Movement goes unseen unless you get near a window. It also helps contain human scent allowing some animals to approach closer than they might if a blind were not used.

Steve
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recrisp
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Jan 08, 2017 21:03 |  #26

Pondrader wrote in post #18238177 (external link)
lol ya I do have a bunch of stuff around here. lol it was nice having a sunset tonight .. its been a while. This doe is actually standing on about two feet of hard packed snow.
thumbnailHosted photo: posted by Pondrader in
./showthread.php?p=182​38177&i=i64399772
forum: Wildlife Talk

2 feet of snow to me might as well be 30 feet, that's hard for me to imagine. Can you guess how many deer are UNDER that snow? heheh
Nice shot again, Jeff. :)
We haven't seen the sun here in Texas where I am really that much until yesterday, then it was crystal clear.

Randy


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recrisp
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Jan 08, 2017 21:05 |  #27

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18238190 (external link)
They would walk thru that area as they went from their preferred habitat (thick swamp grasses) to the cattle pasture. They went to the cattle pasture to peck undigested bits of cracked corn out of the cattle crap. They would also rest share on occasion, "just because".

BUT, after photographing them a few times as passers-thru, I put some scratch out in the area, and it really helped, because then the pheasants would spend more time there, eating, instead of just passing thru and occasionally resting.

.

That sounds pretty tasty, cattle crap, Mmm-mmm... :)
I didn't know that though, learn something new every day.

Smart on your part to put seed there though, and they like not having to 'dig' for supper. heheh

Randy


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recrisp
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Jan 08, 2017 21:10 |  #28

Grizz1 wrote in post #18238218 (external link)
OK, Randy, (recrisp) I have to help set the record straight for you. Jeff lives in another world. He has the gear and skill to use it but lives among the birds/animals that he shares with us. When shooting, I don't think he worries about distance traveled as much as minimum focus distance! They come to him!! Can you tell that I'm just a little envious? I recall seeing the size of the firewood stacks when I visited his area last fall and it helps me feel a little better though.;-)a
QUOTED IMAGE
[IMAGE'S LINK: https://flic.kr/p/e2RP​wo] (external link)BLIND 006 (external link) by steve findling (external link), on Flickr
This is a hub blind with leafy wear on the outside. It weighs about 7lbs, has many windows, over 5 feet square and about 5 foot 6 inches tall in center. I use it mainly for archery hunting but works great for photography as well. These are the blinds I leave set up for long periods, this one has faded a lot, taking on a orange/pink color from being in the Sunlight too long.
My experience with blinds have mostly been used for hunting the Eastern Wild Turkey and White Tail Deer. They can be set up in a large open field at daybreak and the Wild Turkey may approach within a few feet soon after they fly down. Deer though will be nervous for several days and avoid them by a hundred yards or more so I brush them in by setting up near heavy cover then cutting Cedar limbs and placing over and around the blind. Deer will get used to them if not brushed in but it takes a couple weeks before they approach very closely.
The advantages of this type blind for me is the room inside, black interior so if you do not open windows across from one another you can go undetected. Movement goes unseen unless you get near a window. It also helps contain human scent allowing some animals to approach closer than they might if a blind were not used.

I know Steve, Jeff and Snow White must live in the same woods where bluebirds land on their shoulders and butterflies are always present. heheheh
I see his shots all of the time, and all of these years I have only seen 1 red fox, his hatch daily, I think. :)

I cannot imagine using a bow with your blind, I haven't given that much thought until you posted that, it is a very large tent though, and here I complain that I can't twerk in mine when times are slow...

Randy


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Jan 08, 2017 22:42 as a reply to Grizz1's post |  #29

.

Steve,

Are you able to shoot from a low POV with that hub blind? A friend of mine had a similar type of hub blind and there was only one spot (the entrance, I think) that facilitated ground-level shooting. If I remember correctly, he cut a slit in one of the other sides and had a zipper installed so that he could shoot at ground level from two sides of the blind. Would such modifications be possible with yours?

.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "peace of mind", NOT "piece of mind".

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Grizz1
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Post has been edited 10 months ago by Grizz1.
Jan 08, 2017 23:01 |  #30

Tom, it would have to be modified to shoot as low as you often like. The 4 corner windows are the lowest at about 30 inches above ground level.
What we have done is, place cedar limbs under the bottom edge, holding the blind up about 6 inches on one side only, allowing a camera/lens to shoot out from underneath. You can't have it staked down tight to do this and a gust of wind can wreck your day.
I stake mine down tight most of the time because I leave it up for long periods of time.
Sometimes I will go with my cousin that has a Double Bull blind and he sets it up each time. With two of us we do not tie it down and many things are possible. If the wind picks up, we share responsibility of holding it in place.
So far the Double Bull is out of my price range.
You are correct about the entrance, it zips from 2 directions and on that corner one could get as low as about 5 inches.


Steve
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