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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Fashion, Editorial & Commercial
Thread started 20 Apr 2017 (Thursday) 22:54
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Need lighting guidance; please help

 
jdm2lpm
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Ashburn, VA
Post has been edited 8 months ago by jdm2lpm with reason 'Added lens information'.
Apr 20, 2017 22:54 |  #1

My wife creates beautiful paper wreaths. She uses old damaged books, bible's, and hymnal books and recycles them by creating paper wreaths. She does this for fun but over the past few months has sold 30 of them.

I have a Canon 5D classic with no flash and a nifty fifty. I want to take professional looking pictures to help grow her business. My vision is to create a wooden background and stain it a dark color to provide contrast to the white paper. I did some research and think I need 2 soft lights but I would really appreciate some guidance. My budget is limited to $100.00.

Can someone please tell me exactly what to purchase and how to setup the shot?

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jdm2lpm
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Apr 20, 2017 22:56 |  #2

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Josh McKinney
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PhotosGuy
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Apr 20, 2017 23:25 |  #3

jdm2lpm wrote in post #18333568 (external link)
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forum: Fashion, Editorial & Commercial

#4 looks pretty good to me. Keep doing that!


FrankC - 20D, RAW, Manual everything...
Classic Carz, Racing, Air Show, Flowers.
Find the light... A few Car Lighting Tips, and MOVE YOUR FEET!
Have you thought about making your own book? // Need an exposure crutch?
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Micro5797
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Post has been last edited 8 months ago by Micro5797. 3 edits done in total.
Apr 20, 2017 23:42 |  #4

#1. Easiest and most affordable.You could simply go into a garage, open the doors. Use the indirect lighting of the covered shade in the day time and this will give you beautiful light.
Place your backdrop on the ground and use a ladder to get above the wreaths. Watch for color cast if you have painted walls in the garage. You could also just use a room in a house with white walls and a nice large window facing North or South. It looks like picture #4 is on your back porch in open shade. It looks like that works well.

#2. Constant lighting in softboxes is more designed for video lighting. With two of these lights you will still need an aperture of about 2.8 and some what higher ISO as you need more light then you think that you do. Unless you have some pretty powerful lights. There are also led video lights.

#3. Using a flash pointed up at a white ceiling makes for a large softbox. Yongnuo have some pretty good and affordable speedlights.

Watch your WB. #1 & 2 should be fine on daylight setting or use shade if you need it warmer looking. #3 set to flash.

Most dollar stores should sell white foam core or poster board if you need to reflect more light into the wreaths.

For a backdrop you should be able to get 4x4 sheets of wood looking flooring at Home depot etc. I forget the exact sizes. You could also get tong and groove laminate flooring for as cheap as $.99 sq foot if on sale or $20/box. You may want to look to see how to cut them and put them together to keep the grains etc looking right.


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jdm2lpm
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Apr 21, 2017 08:10 as a reply to Micro5797's post |  #5

Thank you for your suggestions. I really like the wood floor 4x4 idea.


Josh McKinney
Gear: Canon 5D Classic with a Nifty Fifty

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PhotosGuy
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Apr 21, 2017 08:18 |  #6

jdm2lpm wrote in post #18333781 (external link)
Thank you for your suggestions. I really like the wood floor 4x4 idea.

I would be careful in using a too busy background which will take attention away from the wreaths.


FrankC - 20D, RAW, Manual everything...
Classic Carz, Racing, Air Show, Flowers.
Find the light... A few Car Lighting Tips, and MOVE YOUR FEET!
Have you thought about making your own book? // Need an exposure crutch?
New Image Size Limits: Image must not exceed 1280 pixels on any side.

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nathancarter
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Joined Dec 2010
Apr 21, 2017 10:41 |  #7

I agree with the above suggestions to use diffuse lighting from a window or open garage door. It's practically free - so you can spend your money and energy on a few different backdrops/sets.

Some wood-panel flooring, and maybe an old door from an architectural salvage place. Set it up when you need it, frame the subject so you don't see any background garage clutter, put it away when you don't need it so your garage is still usable.

Micro5797 wrote in post #18333598 (external link)
#2. Constant lighting in softboxes is more designed for video lighting. With two of these lights you will still need an aperture of about 2.8 and some what higher ISO as you need more light then you think that you do. Unless you have some pretty powerful lights. There are also led video lights.

No need to use a wide aperture and high ISO with nonmoving subjects. Just use a tripod and a long shutter speed to get the correct exposure, while maintaining an appropriate aperture and ISO.


http://www.avidchick.c​om (external link) for business stuff
http://www.facebook.co​m/VictorVoyeur (external link) for fun stuff

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Need lighting guidance; please help
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