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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial
Thread started 19 Apr 2017 (Wednesday) 02:52
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Jupiter and Four Moons

 
Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Joined Dec 2015
Post has been edited 7 days ago by Roy A. Rust.
Apr 19, 2017 02:52 |  #1

I had given up on my Meade ETX 125 telescope a long time ago. But after getting my new Orion SkyView Pro mount, I removed the ETX tube from the Meade forked mount, and attached a dovetail rail on it to see what it would do on a decent mount. It was still too shaky with it mounted on just the plastic mount pad on the bottom of the OTA, so I added a cradle to hold the front of the scope, and tied it down with a strap. I was also nervous about that plastic mounting pad. Plastic is supposed to get brittle and break eventually, so I didn't trust it. I like it now! I tried it out on Jupiter tonight, and this is the result of the scope on the new mount.

We're supposed to be back to cloudy skies and rain for the next few days, so this might be the only chance I get for a while.

Exposure info: Nikon D5500 - Meade ETX 125, 127mm x 1900mm Telescope gives a focal ratio of f:15 - 1/8 Second - ISO 100 - Cropped and reduced.
(Ignore the lens data from the EXIF. I had to insert something to include it in my gallery, so I told POTN it was my Tamron lens. I guess that's cheating, but they give us no choice.)

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jgoetz4
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233 posts
Joined Dec 2005
Hanover, Pa-Baltimore, Md
Apr 19, 2017 07:15 |  #2

Nice picture Roy :-)


6D, 10-22 (modified for the 6D) 50 1.8 STM, Tamron 70-200 2.8 VC, 70-300L IS, Da Bigma, Kenko Pro 1.4x tc
Fuji X-E1 and a bunch of glass
Fuji X100
Sky-Watcher 8'' Dobsonian

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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Joined Dec 2015
Apr 19, 2017 12:19 |  #3

jgoetz4 wrote in post #18331878 (external link)
Nice picture Roy :-)

Thanks! After my previous efforts with the telescope in it's original forked mount, it surprised me that it turned out as well as it did.




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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Post has been edited 6 days ago by Roy A. Rust.
Apr 19, 2017 13:31 |  #4

This is cropped to 100%, which leaves Callisto out of the picture - it's too far away from Jupiter to show up in this cropped image. I decreased the amount of green, darkened slightly, and increased the saturation to enhance the colors a bit.

(And again, ignore the lens listed in the EXIF info. Telescopes aren't listed, so I substituted my Tamron to get it included in my gallery. Cheating again!!!)

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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Apr 20, 2017 01:42 |  #5

I wondered how different photos, taken with different focal lengths would compare, so I compiled a group of four shots. The first was taken with my Tamron 150 - 600mm lens plus the Kenko 1.4x TC. The rest were taken with my telescope, starting with the camera mounted on the adapter, which provided a 1900mm focal length. Then, I added an extender between the adapter and the camera, to lengthen the focal length to 2310mm. And for the last image, I added the Kenko 1.4 TC to further lengthen the focal length to 3234mm. With the crop factor of my sensor the 35mm equivalent focal length of the last image is stretched out to 4851mm! And my new Orion SkyView Pro mount handled it just fine. There was a slight amount of jiggle when I focused it, but it stopped immediately after I stopped touching it. Otherwise, it is perfectly rigid and tracks just fine.

And I used to think I was getting up close with my Tamron lens with the TC, which gives me a focal length of 840mm. Gotta try it on the moon and Saturn next.

These are all full-frame vertically. Just cropped horizontally to squeeze them into this composite.

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Inspeqtor
Why Can't I think of things like this too??
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Joined Mar 2008
Elkhart, Indiana
Apr 20, 2017 03:03 |  #6

Now I am getting jealous Roy! ;-)a

Wonderful shots! When you shoot the moon with your cope be sure to find the flags!  :p

I read somewhere by now the flags will be withering away to nothin


Charles
Canon 60D Gripped * Canon XSi * Flickr Account (external link)
Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-500 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM
Canon 18-55 IS Kit Lens * Canon 70-300 IS USM * Canon 50mm f1.8 * Canon 580EX II *** iOptron 3302W Star Tracker

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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Post has been edited 5 days ago by Roy A. Rust with reason 'add a comment'.
Apr 20, 2017 03:31 |  #7

Inspeqtor wrote in post #18332666 (external link)
Now I am getting jealous Roy! ;-)a

Wonderful shots! When you shoot the moon with your cope be sure to find the flags!  :p

I read somewhere by now the flags will be withering away to nothin

Thanks. I'm getting ready to go out and try for Saturn - maybe the moon, too.

The largest land-based telescopes on Earth can't resolve the flags, nor can the Hubble Space Telescope. I don't think I'll have much luck, either. I can download some taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter that show all the landing sites, with footprints, rover tracks, modules, and even a flag or two.




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Inspeqtor
Why Can't I think of things like this too??
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Joined Mar 2008
Elkhart, Indiana
Apr 20, 2017 08:27 |  #8

Roy A. Rust wrote in post #18332670 (external link)
Inspeqtor wrote in post #18332666 (external link)
Now I am getting jealous Roy! ;-)a

Wonderful shots! When you shoot the moon with your cope be sure to find the flags!  :p

I read somewhere by now the flags will be withering away to nothin

Thanks. I'm getting ready to go out and try for Saturn - maybe the moon, too.

The largest land-based telescopes on Earth can't resolve the flags, nor can the Hubble Space Telescope. I don't think I'll have much luck, either. I can download some taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter that show all the landing sites, with footprints, rover tracks, modules, and even a flag or two.

I was being silly about getting pictures of the flag. I know it is impossible to get.

Post a link for me (and others!) of where to download the photos you mention above.

Thank you!


Charles
Canon 60D Gripped * Canon XSi * Flickr Account (external link)
Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-500 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM
Canon 18-55 IS Kit Lens * Canon 70-300 IS USM * Canon 50mm f1.8 * Canon 580EX II *** iOptron 3302W Star Tracker

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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Joined Dec 2015
Apr 20, 2017 14:58 |  #9

Inspeqtor wrote in post #18332801 (external link)
I was being silly about getting pictures of the flag. I know it is impossible to get.

Post a link for me (and others!) of where to download the photos you mention above.

Thank you!

I was pretty sure you were kidding. I was, too!

Rather than try to list all the sites that allow you to check the Apollo Landing Sites, just "Google" it, and it will give you a LONG list of links. Here's a cropped list of what I got when I did it... The one that's titled "New Images Offer Sharper Views...." is better than older images. The Lunar Orbiter took them from a lower altitude that provides sharper images of the landing sites.

Good hunting!

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TCampbell
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Joined Apr 2012
Apr 20, 2017 18:27 |  #10

Roy A. Rust wrote in post #18332670 (external link)
Thanks. I'm getting ready to go out and try for Saturn - maybe the moon, too.

The largest land-based telescopes on Earth can't resolve the flags, nor can the Hubble Space Telescope. I don't think I'll have much luck, either. I can download some taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter that show all the landing sites, with footprints, rover tracks, modules, and even a flag or two.

When we do public outreach with the telescopes we get that question a lot (Can we see the flag?)

I did the math on that once. I didn't calculate the flag -- someone once asked me about seeing the lunar rover. It's just fractionally over 3 meters long. I think I worked out that the telescope would need to have a diameter of roughly 25 meters (about 82') to have resolve a detail as small as 3 meters long at a distance of 384,000 km (about 240,000 miles).

The largest telescopes in the world are only just slightly over 10 meters (and those are huge).

You can use Dawes' Limit to work that out. https://en.wikipedia.o​rg/wiki/Dawes%27_limit (external link)




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Roy ­ A. ­ Rust
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Post has been edited 4 days ago by Roy A. Rust.
Apr 21, 2017 05:13 |  #11

The pictures that started this thread were taken on April 18th, but I went out again the next night, April 19th, to get some more shots of Jupiter. As I was checking them again tonight, I realized that I managed to get the Great Red Spot in the shots from last night. Of course, there are no longer 4 moons showing in this picture - just Io and Europa, but with the red spot, I don't miss them. I'm feeling a lot better about the Meade ETX 125 telescope now. I never thought getting a better mount would make this much difference in the images I can get with it.

(And again, since telescopes aren't on the list, I used my Tamron lens to post this to my gallery.)

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Jupiter and Four Moons
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