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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre People Talk
Thread started 05 Jul 2017 (Wednesday) 14:29
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Problematic portrait

 
craigat
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Boston
Jul 05, 2017 14:29 |  #1

I have a friend who's asked me to help her get some new headshots. Happy to do it, of course, but there's a technical problem that I don't know how to overcome. She has an eye condition, forget what it's called, but it makes her retina reflect light like a cat (sadly, it also makes her blind in that eye). To look at her, you'd never know, but because of the reflection effect, one eye seems to really glow for a camera when lit properly. Obviously, the goal would be for her eyes to look balanced, but if I use any standard technique that would result in catch lights in the eye, one of them will be several stops brighter than the other. I'm sure there's some technique or approach that would allow me to compensate, but I have no idea of what. Would appreciate any suggestions, comments, etc you can provide.

Thanks




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nathancarter
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Jul 05, 2017 14:44 |  #2

1. Did you ask her how she wants you to handle it?

2. Opinion, use a lighting style that will flatter the shape and structure of her face, and fix the eye in post. If the's facing toward the camera, you can probably use Photoshop to take the pupil/iris from the correct eye and flip/transform it to fit the glowing eye. Or, if that's not possible, take a couple of shots, as if doing HDR bracketing, so you have an exposure with a less-bright eye to drop in.


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craigat
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Jul 05, 2017 14:47 as a reply to nathancarter's post |  #3

interesting idea, I hadn't thought of replacing the eye. I have spoke with her, and she doesn't like the way the glowing eye looks in pics, so though she doesn't know anything about "how" to do it, she would like for them to look normal (which is how they look in normal life).




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RDKirk
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Jul 06, 2017 08:26 |  #4

craigat wrote in post #18394811 (external link)
interesting idea, I hadn't thought of replacing the eye. I have spoke with her, and she doesn't like the way the glowing eye looks in pics, so though she doesn't know anything about "how" to do it, she would like for them to look normal (which is how they look in normal life).

If it's something that's only seen in photographs, it's a photographic problem like red-eye or exaggerated perspective that doesn't even need to asked about.

I would cut and paste the iris from the other eye as has been suggested. Be sure to make note of the actual brightness level and any shadows differing in that eye from the other and match them as necessary. This kind of operation is one with which a tablet comes in handy for controlled cutting, erasing, and such.




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craigat
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Jul 06, 2017 08:45 as a reply to RDKirk's post |  #5

Fortunately, I use a tablet for retouching, it does make life much easier (at least it after I got used to it). I would agree that this is a photo only problem, but I've not had to do any red eye fixes or such before, certainly haven't had to replace an eye altogether. Nonetheless, that does seem to be the way to go.




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davesrose
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Jul 07, 2017 19:27 |  #6

I've done quite a bit of photo retouching of glasses glare, bruises, and such. I'd say take the best photo you can and then see what turns up. I don't think it's a real problem because it's one eye. See how it turns out. If the effected eye has a red eye type effect, you can easily copy the good eye and reflect it in a new layer (and then fine tune it with a transform to size it the same way as the effected eye). I'm also an illustrator, so it's true I'm comfortable painting catch lights too. Well it's more important if it's going on in the pupil...so depends on scenario.


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Alveric
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Jul 07, 2017 21:05 |  #7

Shoot her in profile.


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kf095
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Jul 11, 2017 10:51 |  #8

Exactly! Portrait doesn't have to be passport picture.


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tdlavigne
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Jul 19, 2017 02:15 |  #9

If she doesn't like it then treat it like any other portrait you'd shoot and just replace the eye with the other. Paint in a catchlight if need be. ~5-10 mins work in PS.




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Nathan
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Jul 27, 2017 13:54 |  #10

What she might often run into is a situation where the flash is fired directly in front of her and the retina reflects right back at the camera - i.e. common with camera phone and point & shoot flash photos.

Lighting these portraits as a photographer would - by raising the light source above her and perhaps to the side - will reduce the chances of the light reflecting in her eye back at the camera.


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Problematic portrait
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