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Thread started 09 Mar 2017 (Thursday) 15:53
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Is it impossible to shoot this kind of bottle 100% in camera?

 
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Aug 11, 2017 19:58 |  #61

BJWOK wrote in post #18425317 (external link)
I think the conversation regarding trademark is totally irrelevant here.

mybottleshop.com.au (my client) sell one-off individual bottles (they are not a en-mass distributor) and the bottle in the shot is literally the bottle you buy.

The manufacturer often supply their own image, but my client chooses to not use them as he is trying to NOT be just another run of the mill online store selling the same as anyone else.

My client wants to present this bottle in it's best appearance possible - the label on the back should be visible if you are looking at the back of the bottle, not from the front.

I think there is no way possible to achieve this in camera, but I was willing to put it out here in case someone can prove me wrong.

Your client can't have the impossible.


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Aug 11, 2017 20:13 as a reply to  @ post 18425324 |  #62

I brought up the same question. The requirements and expectations are in conflict with each other.


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BJWOK
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Aug 12, 2017 19:57 |  #63

OhLook, the thing is all the supplied images of this product are extensively photoshopped to not see that label through the bottle, my client wants his own version of that image.

And this plays into Davesrose post: my client doesn't want to pay me for hours and hours of photoshop work after the shoot when I typically spend 3 minutes max on every other bottle, hence my OP asking if it's possible to do this entirely in camera :)


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Aug 13, 2017 01:18 |  #64

the label on the back should be visible if you are looking at the back of the bottle, not from the front

Apparently, that's not how corporate feels. From corporate site for public distribution ...


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Normally the back of a label would be left white; the thinking, why waste the printing cost. The fact that the company made the deliberate decision to spend the money to make it black demonstrates that they want it to be clearly visible as you view the product from the front. Your client believes in featuring a photo of the actual bottle, but yet wants it shot to not look like the actual bottle. smh



  
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Aug 13, 2017 07:43 |  #65

Apparently you might be looking at a wrong image. Here's how they supplied my client: https://www.mybottlesh​op.com.au/1792-sweet-wheat-bourbon (external link)

The idea was to replicate this in camera without (the obvious) photoshop :)


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Aug 13, 2017 08:42 |  #66

I don't understand the need to constantly point out legal issues, whether real or imagined. The point was made, just move on. If you are not a lawyer, everything is presumption unless you have case law examples that match this scenario in the country of origin.


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Aug 13, 2017 10:06 |  #67

Someone mentioned it earlier. There's a branding issue here that the client is missing. If the bottle has a label on the back then it needs to stay there and it needs to stay in the photo. It's darkened in order to make the front label stand out more against the backdrop placed on the back of the bottle. Now, if this company makes a bourbon without the back label then your client needs to get THAT bottle.

Your sample image without the label on the back may be Photoshopped or maybe they may make a bottle without the rear label.

I've done little product photography but when I did the client wanted the photos to look like the actual product they were selling.

The last HUGE project I did involved photography AND catalog layout. This was back in the early 90's so yes, I used film photography for this project. I got some good money from it but it was tedious laying out the items in the catalog the way the client wanted them. It was 9 items per page with a short description, price, and a photograph. 300+ pages of this kind of work. It took me about 6 months to complete it since I was working full time I had to squeeze this project in while I was at home.

In the end it was ALL about how the actual item looked because people were buying from their catalog. Same goes for online. If I bought a bottle of this bourbon and saw the nice clear background on the bottle I would feel short changed if I ordered that bottle without the label and got one with a label. I would think I received the wrong bottle. I know a phone call or 2 would be made...

I don't know much about this bourbon but I may have to run to my liquor store and check this one out. I love me some good bourbon. :)


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Aug 13, 2017 12:45 |  #68

This is not just a potential legal issue, and sure, that's a whole other can of worms; it's a shooting the correct product accurately issue.

Barton Distillery in Bardstown, Ky., is now own by Sazerac out of New Orleans. Among other offerings, Barton produces the 1792 line of Bourbon. This line has 4 sub-products. As pictured on their website, only the "Small Batch" sub-brand does not feature the black rear label. The three other varieties clearly have it. I'm guessing the client may be unclear about this and may be confusing his variety. Once again, I would think all parties involved would be interested in having the correct product accurately featured. Hope this helps.

http://www.sazerac.com …=RT99&PCID=7&FI​D=1&NBid=1 (external link)

: ) Having grown up in Louisville, Ky, I can remember my dad, a photographer, shooting gigs for the distilleries. Many, many different brands and sub-brands. I grew up in a house full of client gifted liquor branded paraphernalia. I'm still using them today. lol


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Sep 19, 2017 11:57 |  #69

It's impossible to capture in camera. The sticker on the one bottle and rear text on the other needs to be removed. Good luck convincing client.




  
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Is it impossible to shoot this kind of bottle 100% in camera?
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